The Boke of Cupide, God of Love

THE BOKE OF CUPIDE, GOD OF LOVE: FOOTNOTES



1 Lines 6-7: And he can make, within a short while, / Of sick (i.e., lovesick) people completely vigorous, whole, and sound [ones] (i.e., he can assuage the sorrow of lovesick people)

2 Lines 18-19: For he can gladden and grieve (make sorrowful) whomever it pleases him to, / And whomever he wishes, [he can] make laugh or sigh [with lovesickness]

3 Some sang loudly, as if they were complaining

4 Lines 141-42: For lovers are the people [of all] who are alive, / Who suffer most (have most suffering), and are most unfortunate (unsuccessful)

5 What is the point of striving against truth (i.e., of not acknowledging the truth)

6 And then will you be called by the same name as I am (i.e., a cuckold)

7 That would have been nothing [if] Love had not existed

8 And sends plenty of (enough) joy to whomever he likes (lit., to whom it pleases him)

THE BOKE OF CUPIDE, GOD OF LOVE: EXPLANATORY NOTES

Abbreviations: see Textual Notes.

1-2 These two lines are produced from Chaucer's Knight's Tale (CT I[A]1785-86). For details of the many resonances with The Knight's Tale, see Chamberlain and Rutherford, respectively.
1-20 Sc notes that such descriptions of "the irresistible power of the god of love" are conventional, citing RR (lines 865-906), Fro