Item 26, The King and His Four Daughters: Introduction

Item 26, THE KING AND HIS FOUR DAUGHTERS, INTRODUCTION: FOOTNOTES

1 For an account of this debate as it relates to the texts discussed here, see Marx, Devil’s Rights and the Redemption, pp. 1–46.

2 For a recent survey of Grosseteste’s career, see McEvoy, Robert Grosseteste; see also Thomson, Writings of Robert Grosseteste, and Southern, Robert Grosseteste.

3 Sajavaara traces the complex relationship of Grosseteste’s allegory of the four daughters to the Midrash, works of St. Bernard of Clairvaux and Hugh of St. Victor, and the earlier Latin allegory Rex et Famulus; see Middle English Translations, pp. 63–90.

4 For a survey of the material derived from and related to Grosseteste’s allegory of the four daughters, see Traver, Four Daughters of God.

5 Marx prints both the Latin Dictum 10 and a translation in Devil’s Rights and the Redemption, pp. 155–59.

6 Rhodes, Poetry Does Theology, pp. 46–47.

7 For the risks associated with discussing doctrine in vernacular literature, see Watson, “Cen­sorship and Cultural Change in Late-Medieval England.”