Book Of Job

BOOK OF JOB: EXPLANATORY NOTES


ABBREVIATIONSCA: Gower, Confessio AmantisCMCursor mundiCT: Chau­cer, Canterbury TalesDBTELA Dic­tionary of Biblical Tradition in English Literature, ed. Jeffrey; HS: Peter Comes­tor, Historia Scholastica, cited by book and chapter, followed by Patrologia Latina column in paren­theses; K: Kalén-Ohlander edition; MEDMiddle English DictionaryNOABNew Oxford Annotated BibleOEDOxford English DictionaryOFPOld French Paraphrase, British Library, MS Egerton 2710, cited by folio and column; Whiting: Whiting, Proverbs, Sentences, and Pro­verbial PhrasesYorkYork Plays, ed. Beadle. For other abbreviations, see Textual Notes.

The book of Job is omitted by Comestor, who turns from the fourth book of Kings to Tobit (Tobias), which here in the Paraphrase follows Job. Neither is this particular order of books indebted to the traditional sequence of the major biblical traditions. The Vulgate passes from the books of Kings and the Chronicles (the latter largely subsumed into the para­phrase of the former here and thus not expected to appear), to Ezra, Nehemias, Tobit, Judith, and Esther, before turning at last to Job. The Septuagint more or less agrees with the Vulgate up to Nehemias, but then turns to the Psalms, the Prayer of Manasseh, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, before Job occurs — we are then given Wisdom of Solomon, Wisdom of Sirach (Ecclesiasticus), Esther, and Judith before Tobit. Only in the nine-volume bible of Cassiodorus do we find some semblance of the order given here: after his section of the “Kings” (which includes the Chronicles) Cassiodorus’ next division is the “Prophets” (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and the twelve minor prophets), followed by Psalms and the five books of “Wisdom.” None of these texts lend themselves to the kind of re­con­structive, “historical” narrative that concerns the Paraphrase-poet. The next divi­sion, how­ever, is “Hagiography”: Job, Tobit, Esther, Judith, Maccabees, and Esdras — pre­cisely the same order of texts (aside from the missing Esdras) that appears in the Para­phrase. One of the poet’s presumed sources for much of his work up to this point has been OFP, but that ends abruptly in the middle of the fourth book of Kings (see explanatory note to line 14088b, above). His sources for the remainder of his work are far less certain. Perhaps as a result of these circumstances, or perhaps because Job can be so inspiring to poets and artists alike, the Paraphrase-poet is at his most distant from the biblical text when he moves through this book. Though one might say, from a strictly scriptural standpoint, that the Para­phrase’s text is thus “garbled,” it is an inspired refashioning, a subtle, theo­logically pro­found permutation of what Bloom calls “one of the world’s great poems” (Where Shall Wisdom, p. 13).

14118 fyfty yoke of oxyn. Job 1:3 gives the number of Job’s oxen as five hundred. Since neither HS nor OFP include Job within their paraphrase, and the Middle English poem Pety Job does not include these opening details as it concentrates on Job’s Dirige, the derivation of this number is unknown.

14138 putt hym furth in prese. The image, as in Job 1:6, is of a council of heavenly beings, among whom is Satan: one of many beings greater than man but lesser than (and subservient to) God. This depiction is far different from the “Devil” figure familiar to most of the West; for discussion of the develop­ment of Satan over time, see Elaine Pagels’ informative and fas­cinating Origin of Satan.

14142 to gette hym leve, this is no lese. The Paraphrase-poet here admits the unfa­mil­iarity of a Satan obedient to God; see note to line 14138.

14213–14 A sodan fyre . . . so brym. The poet’s choice of the term brym is no elaboration: Job 1:16 describes the fire that consumes Job’s stock as a fire from God in Heaven, i.e., brimstone.

14289–92 K (4:14) regards these lines as “anacoluthon” — that is, lacking sequence — since it would make more sense for them to occur before Job’s preceding lament.

14315–16 Bot luke that thou not greve / his sawle bot kepe yt clene. God’s command to Satan in Job 2:6 is not that Job’s soul be saved, but his life. The poet’s alteration from life to soul might well result from the significant interest in the late Middle Ages on the soul and salvation as revealed in the many medieval works incorporating debates between the soul and body.

14347 yll are. The concern of Job’s contemporaries with his “ill air” reflects an under­standing of disease as being related to invisible but poisonous pockets of air. This concept lasted well into the nineteenth century in the West; the term malaria, for instance, which according to the OED first appeared in 1740, literally means “bad air.”

14357 Blyse. So Job 2:9 in the Hebrew and in the Vulgate (“Benedic Deo”), though many modern translations have replaced the term with “Curse.” The ori­ginal is wholly accurate, however, to what we might call a sarcastic stance on the part of Job’s wife.

14363–64 Thou spekes evyn als a foyle / that hath no womans wytt. In Job 2:10 he says his wife speaks “like one of the foolish women.” The change here is intriguing: her foolish speech is emblematic not of being a woman but of being less than a woman. This is yet one more revelation of the relatively high regard in which the poet seems to hold women, a regard that, at times, quietly pushes even Scripture aside.

14408 sex days. According to Job 2:13, the three men sit with him for seven days and nights.

14447 Man, knaw thiselfe. The advice is proverbial, deriving from (at least) the An­cient Greeks (the originating source varies, but it was famously inscribed on the walls of the forecourt of the Delphic Oracle). For some of its many appearances in Middle English, see Whiting K100.

14494–95 penauns ordand wore / Eftur mens dedes wore done. Job recommends that the pains of penance (more properly speaking, the acts of satisfaction that re­flect the penitent’s contrition) ought to equate to the pains of the sins to which they correspond; this advice is in perfect theoretic keeping with the dicta of the Church.

14501 when the Day of Dome is dyght. Job’s reference to Judgment Day here is per­haps surprising given Western associations between this subject and Chris­tian theology, especially as it is derived from the misunderstood book of the Apocalypse (Revela­tion). Yet, as Daniel 12:1–3 shows, the doctrine of resur­rection and judgment does have some roots in late Jewish thought (for dis­cussion of the history, see Segal’s Life after Death). Beginning with Cle­ment of Rome, Christian exegetes have also pointed to Job 19:25–27 as a refer­ence to Christian understandings of life after death (thus, e.g., Au­gus­tine, City of God22.29), seeing in these “dif­ficult, probably textually cor­rupt, ver­ses” (NOAB, p. 645) a “locus classicus of the doctrine of resur­rec­tion” (Zink, “Impatient Job,” p. 147). By the later Middle Ages, this con­nec­tion was gen­erally considered factual, no doubt largely due to Jerome’s Chris­tologically-influenced translation of the lines in the Vulgate. Thus “Domesday” also appears in Pety Job; see especially line 255.

14523 This line, an echo of Proverbs 24:16 (“Septies enim cadet iustus et re­surget”), does not appear in Job or in Pety Job.

14539 For dome is His forto dystrye. Ohlander’s glossary ("Old French Parallels," p. 28) lists dystrye under the verb dystroy(e), meaning “to destroy.” Though unnoted by the MED, a far more likely meaning would be related to the verb distreinen, meaning “to compel.”

14557–616 The poet (or his source) is paraphrasing Job very loosely throughout, which makes it difficult to correspond between Paraphrase and Bible at any given point. This section, for instance, seemingly ought to be Job’s first response to Bildad (chapters 9–10), but it is, instead, his second (chapter 19).

14595 My Sayvyour lyfes. Job’s reference to Christ is a technically ahistorical ap­pearance of Chris­tianity in the poet’s paraphrase of this Jewish text, but it is one with origins in the Church Fathers.

14633 Of gud werke God dose ylk dele. Zophar’s point, one that does not explicitly appear in Job, is one of deep theological import: whether or not humans can “effect” grace — whether they are capable of doing good with­out God actually doing the good for them. The question came to a forefront in the early fifth century, as a result of the teachings of the British monk Pelagius, who “could not accept that human beings were so corrupted at birth that they could not help sinning” (Bell, Cloud, p. 144). This position brought Pe­lagius into conflict with Augustine, who believed that the Fall left man­kind inherently “fallen, damned, doomed, condemned. At birth we are sim­ply ‘one lump of sin’ and because we are so totally, so helplessly cor­rupted, we can no more do good of our own power than a blind man can see” (Bell, Cloud, p. 147). Pelagianism was condemned in the West, partly due to Au­gus­tine’s repu­­tation, but the issue continued to resurface for centuries, requiring repeated condemnations. Thomas Bradwardine, for example, felt it was necessary to write a full treatise denouncing the belief in fourteenth-century England (De causa Dei contra Pelagium et de virtute causarum). As we see here, the Para­phrase-poet is in keeping with the orthodox position.

14682 to make me turment on a tre. The point seems to be that even if God were to crucify him, Job would still maintain his integrity. He will not betray his righteousness so long as he believes in a righteous (if incom­pre­hensible) God (see the following lines). At the same time, it is difficult not to see in this nonbiblical in­sertion to Job’s reply a reference to Christ. Though Job suffers terribly, the Paraphrase-poet also seems to say, Christ suffered more: the tor­ment of the Crucifixion lies far beyond even Job’s experience.

14713–24 The parable of the rich man and the leper, often entitled “Dives and La­za­rus,” was a popular one in the Middle Ages. It appears, for instance, in Chau­cer’s Summoner’s Tale, where the friar notes that “Lazar and Dives lyveden diversly, / And divers gerdon hadden they therby” (CT III[D]1877–78). The poet’s use of the parable is interesting here for its ambiguity. Spoken by Eli­phaz, it nevertheless appears to support Job’s Lazarus-like position against the self-assured self-righteousness of his friends. Eliphaz thus incriminates his own actions by being unable to recognize the leper before him.

14748 no malyse mene. Job insists that his intentions are benevolent toward the friends who rebuke him — and toward the God that may or may not have kind intentions. Job’s insistence on his integrity allows the line to be read in several ways given the variant meanings of the verb mene in Mid­dle English: to intend, speak, comprehend, or explain (MED menen, v.1–2).

14845–64 Job’s assessment of what is going on is remarkably accurate. He neither judges nor blames God, but rather attempts to acknowledge what he is ex­per­iencing. Job sees that the Fiend cannot touch his soul and, in articu­lating so clearly the leeway God has given the Fiend, indirectly praises God for granting him control over his own soulful decisions.

14896 Mary His moyder. There is, of course, no precedent in the biblical book of Job for a reference to Mary as Mater Dei, but the insertion reveals the uni­versal appeal of the Job story, which remains as profound for its medieval Chris­tian readers as it did for its antique Hebrew writers. At the same time, its inclusion here is highly ambiguous. Zophar appears to acknowledge God as a redemptive principle, yet his words are more judgmental than merci­ful. Like Bildad, he is more committed to his understanding of righteous retri­bution than truth.

14917–20 K notes (1:cxcii) an echo of Pety Job, lines 289–90. The Latin is from Job 14:1, the fifth lesson of the Dirge (see explanatory note to line 14941).

14941 Job begins his “playnt” (line 14939) with a proclamation of his complete trust in God’s power as he prays for mercy. This Latin phrase, from Job 7:16, is the first of the Nine Lessons of the Dirge, a sequence of verses drawn from Job (Job 7:16–21 [lesson 1], 10:1–7 [2], 10:8–12 [3], 13:22–28 [4], 14:1–6 [5], 14:13–16 [6], 17:1–3 and 11-25 [7], 19:20–27 [8], and 10:18–22 [9]) recited during the Matins of the Office of the Dead (Moral Love Songs, ed. Fein, p. 289). Fein characterizes the late Middle Ages as “a culture that fully em­braced the Office of the Dead as a ritualized way to enclose and confront death, or at least to accept its mys­tery through time-honored words of ear­nest entreaty, rebellion, ques­tion­ing, and submission. . . . Repetition of the Latin — whether fully under­stood or not by auditors — would most likely have been a somber but com­forting ex­perience” (p. 289). The first of these devo­tions became repre­sentative of the whole sequence in symbolizing the con­dition of man; it serves, for instance, as the end-stanza refrain in Pety Job, just as it has a prom­inent place in several other similarly penitential works.

14946 teche me forto take Thi trace. The line may well owe something to the anti­phon that begins the first nocturn of Matins, “Dirige, Domine Deus meus” (“Direct my path, O Lord my God”), from which the Dirge takes its name (see ex­planatory note to line 14941). The term trace, as Job uses it here, appears to be influenced by the kind of Platonic theological philosophies asso­ciated with Bonaventure; this same mode of thinking also deepens our under­standing of Job’s further request to “have mynd of Thee” in the following line: Job understands that it is his mind that interposes obstacles between him and his goal, so he asks God for guidance in using his mind.

14965–68 K notes (1:cxcii) an echo of Pety Job, lines 157–59. The Latin is from Job 10:9, the third lesson of the Dirge (see explanatory note to line 14941).

14966 umthynke. The verb is most often reflexive in Middle English, especially when directed toward God, and it reflects the unbiased circumspection Job desires from his prosecutors, the kind of perspective only God can provide.

14977–94 Job’s discourse on God’s merciful power leads the poet to incorporate two New Testa­ment stories into his text: the raising of Lazarus and the Gospel story of the thief upon the cross. One implication of this seems to be that the book of Job, with its troubling questions of evil, power, and justice, is an a­syn­chronous text: not constrained to any one time or timeline but for all times, existing outside of timelines. The overlay is thus not unlike the climax of Piers Plowman, in which the mind, functioning outside time and space, can join Abraham and Moses in racing to witness the Crucifixion, deli­ver­ance, and resurrection of Christ, “that redeeming aspect of Trinity whereby eter­nity is realized in time and space” (Peck, “Number,” p. 38).

15008 be my frend als Thou was before. The Paraphrase-poet emphasizes the value of friendship as Job, whose public, conventional friends have proved to be in­adequate, nevertheless desires friendship. As Laelius notes in Cicero’s De ami­citia 19, the need for companionship is part of human nature. Job’s con­cern, then, is that he seems to have lost his one truly adequate friend, God.

15038 Thi man ay whyls I moght. Job places himself in the subservient position of a feudal relationship with God, a bond built on personal loyalty and the ex­change of a vassal’s support for the lord’s protection. Homage, the act of thus becoming another’s “man” (Latin homo), involved the vassal kneeling before the lord and placing his joined hands (as in prayer) between those of his lord. The relationship was technically indis­soluble, like marriage, yet what Job seeks is the reassurance that these bonds still function. It is worth noting that, although as a vassal he might doubt his lord’s protection in his case (given the attacks to which he has been made subject), Job does not waver in his support for his Lord.

15049–15104 God’s reply to Job is substantially different from that which appears at the end of the biblical text. Most noticeable in its absence is God’s long se­quence of rhetorical questions in Job 38–41 that famously puts Job and all mortals “in their place”: “Canst thou draw out the Leviathan with a hook? . . . Will he make a covenant with thee, and wilt thou take him to be a ser­vant for ever?” (Job 40:20–23). Instead of this “bombardment of exuber­ances” that “is unanswerable, and substitutes power for justification” (Bloom, Where Shall Wisdom, p. 17), the Paraphrase-poet has God simply insist on Job’s need to be sub­mis­sive before Him, and to admit to his own in­herent sinfulness be­fore the perfection of the Divine. In this regard, God’s speech seems most in­debted to the words of the missing fourth friend, Elihu (Job 33–37), a fact that may lie behind God’s strange shift to speaking in the third person starting in line 15079.

15058 als thee thynke in thi toyght. God makes clear that He knows even Job’s un­spoken thoughts, a fact that Job states in the biblical text (Job 42:2).

15093–94 God’s statement that all who are born after the Fall are unclene / and evyll in all degré acknowledges the basic need for baptism, which Job has not parti­cipated in. At the same time, Job’s movement beyond complaint toward the expression of his complete love of God in stanza 1260 opens the way for him to participate in God’s will that “is ever of mercy free” (line 15050). Note that Job’s “wo is went away” (line 15114) once God addresses him, and he prays that he might “clensed be” (line 15139).

15133–36 K notes (1:cxcii) an echo of Pety Job, lines 660–61. The Latin is from Job 10:20, the ninth lesson of the Dirge (see explanatory note to line 14941).

15139–44 Compare Chaucer’s Parson’s Tale, which cites this passage in Job as a step in the contritional process that leads to satisfaction (CT X[I]175–87).

15170 then was his grefe all gon, I geyse. The Paraphrase-poet’s tag, I geyse, intro­duces some inter­es­ting ambiguities. On the one hand, it might indicate an experi­ential truth (“I perceive”) that testifies to the efficacy of devout prayer; on the other hand, it might indicate an experiential doubt (“I guess”) about Job truly being relieved of the grief of losing so many of his loved ones as a re­sult of God allowing the Fiend to do so much physical harm to the loyal man.

15197–15204 The poet infuses his conclusion with romance elements as Job’s good ending is shown by the worshipful heritage of his children. Thus Job’s “myrth wold multyplye” (line 15208), along with his wealth (line 15212).

15211 fresch. See explanatory note to line 12355, above.

15213–16 God graunt us grace to lyfe / in luf and charité, / That we our gast may gyfe / to myrth. The poet’s prayer restates the theme of love and charity expressed most clearly in his New Testament insertions to the narrative (Dives and Lazarus, the thief on the cross), and his specificity about the reception of grace — that it gives mirth to the soul, rather than the body — underscores the fundamental lesson of Job.


BOOK OF JOB: TEXTUAL NOTES


ABBREVIATIONS: L: MS Longleat 257; H: Heuser edition (partial); K: Kalén-Ohlander edition; O: Ohlander’s corrigenda to K; P: Peck edition (partial); S: MS Selden Supra 52 (base text for this edition).

14090 helfull. So L, K. S: lefull.
here. So L, K. S: lere.


14091 whoso. S: so inserted above the line.

14098 erthly. S: ly inserted above the line.

14113 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 130r): Job.

14114 S: line 14116 written and canceled, line 14114 inserted above.

14148 He. So K. S: hym.

14169 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 130v): no heading.

14175 may. S: mayn.

14185 fayren. So K. S: fayrer. L: part.

14203 enogh. S: o inserted above the line.

14209 to me. So L, K. S omits.

14225 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 131r): no heading.

14231 Hyder. So L, K. S: hylder.

14233 then. So L, K. S: þem.

14236 syghtys se. So L, K. S: fyghtyns fle.

14239 on. S: inserted above canceled letters.

14264 of. S: inserted above the line.

14277 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 131v): no heading.
S: lines 14277–95 are repeated with minor variations after line 14331 (at the top of fol. 132r).


14281 Thou. S: corrected from þi.

14282 werldly. So L, K. S: worthy.
weld. So L, K. S: wend. The correct reading, weld, is properly copied in the canceled rewrite of this line following line 14331. See textual note to line 14277.


14286 no. So L, K. S omits here, but includes in the canceled rewrite of this lines following line 14331 (though the rewrite mistakenly copies ferrer for ferther at that point). See textual note to line 14277.
14286, 88 So L, K. S: lines transposed both here and in the canceled rewrite of these lines following line 14331. See textual note to line 14277.


14288 Thi. So L, K. S: þe. The correct reading, þi, is properly copied in the can­celed rewrite of this line following line 14331. See textual note to line 14277.

14296 greve. So L, K. S: geue.

14306 not. So L, K. S omits.

14317 forthy. So L, K. S omits.

14331 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 132r): Job.
See textual note to line 14277.


14335 Bot. So L, K. S: bo.

14336 allone. So L, K. S: at þe last.

14342 cors. So L, K. S omits.

14347 and. So L, K. S omits.

14351 releve. So L, K. S: relesch.

14352 owt. So L, K. S: ow.

14367 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 132v): no heading.

14373 gyfes. So L, K. S: gyf.

14378 yt. S: and yt. Compare L, however: naked and nedy is noght to layne.

14388 his. S: y his.

14393 space. S: place space.

14401 Bot. So L, K. S: Bon.

14402 and bett. S: inserted above the line.

14405–08 Lines 14405–06 and 14407–08 are transposed in S, but marked for correc­tion in the margin.

14408 S: line 14409 copied and then canceled before being recopied in its proper place.

14422 to. So L, K. S: into.

14423 non me. So L, K. S: non then me.

14425 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 133r): Job.
Elyphath. So L, K. S, O: Elypagh.


14427 it had lent. So L, K. S: he had hent.

14440 that thee is sent thies. So L, K. S: for þi is sent þe.

14442 all. So L, K. S: als.

14446 slyke. So L, K. S: syke.

14454 be. So L, K. S omits.

14458 sythes. So K. S swylke. L: such.

14465 faurth. So L, K. S: faruth.

14469 wogh. So L, K. S: wagh.

14474 and. So L, K. S omits.

14479 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 133v): Job.

14483 laythes. So L, K. S: lath laythers.

14487 That. S: þat I.

14489 as. So L, K. S omits.

14492 mo. So L, K. S omits.

14495 mens. So L, K. S: men.

14509 Then Baldath. So L, K. S: þe Balath.

14510 to. So L, K. S: so.

14516 men. S: inserted above canceled man.

14537 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 134r): Job.
Allmighty. S: ty inserted above the line.


14551 fare. So L, K. S omits.

14567 gabbyng. So L, K. S: galbyng.

14577 The line as it stands is defective in both S and L, breaking the rhyme. Line 14579 in S is also defective, though I have followed K in emending that line from L. On this line, K notes (4.22) that adding “wele after wryttyn would save the rime but make the line too long.” Another possibility would be to alter the ending to ware wryt wele, or ware wryt full, but neither is plausible enough to convince me to alter the text.

14579 a poyntyll of steylle. So L, K. S: with steylle satyt þerfor. The line in S is clearly defective as it fails to hold the rhyme. See textual note to line 14577.

14581 myght ever more. So L, K. S: euer more my3t.

14593 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 134v): Job.

14595 Sayvyour. S: y inserted above the line.

14605–06 So L, K. S: missing lines.

14609 come. So L, K. S: come not.
men. S: mene.


14610 sore. S: inserted above the line.

14621 thou. So L, K. S: þen.

14644 dyd. So L, K. S: dyll.

14646 he. So L, K. S omits.

14653 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 135r): Job.

14682 S: inserted above canceled line 14684.

14683 ryghtwysnes. So L, K. S: ryghtwyse.

14691 lyfes. So L, K. S: lyf.

14707 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 135v: Job.

14725 Forthi. S: ffor I þi.

14733 it. So L, K. S omits.

14738 kavtels. S: v inserted above the line.

14739 That. So L, K. S omits.

14748 malyse. So S. L, K: malyce.

14754 then. So L, K. S: þem.

14761 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 136r): Job.

14766 S: inserted above canceled line 14768.

14774 thi. So L, K. S omits.

14780 bot. So L, K. S: bo.

14788 hame. S: inserted above canceled name.

14802 solace. So L, K. S: salace.

14810 other. S: corrected from uther.

14819 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 136v): Job.

14826 fro. So L, K. S: for.

14828 levere. So L, K. S: levare.

14841 Ne. So L, K. S: he.

14843 mysgovernaunse. So L, K. S: mysgouernse.

14845 Bot. So L, K. S: Bo.

14875 yow1. S: h yow.
yow2. S: inserted above the line.


14879 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 137r): Job.

14931 Fayrewele. So L, K. S: Fayre.

14935 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 137v): Job.

14955 men. So L, K. S: me.

14968 me. So L, K. S omits.

14974 lyges. So S. L, K: lygges.

14979 faur. L, K: IV. S: XL. L is confirmed by John 11:17, 39: “four days.”

14993 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 138r): Job.
Thou. So L, K. S: þat.


14995 wrang. S: letter (y?) canceled before.

14997 stale. So L, K. S: stae, with a faint curl above the e.

15002 Thi wyll. So L, K. S: in whyls.

15013 governd. So L, K. S: gouernernd.

15014 dere. So L, K. S: drere.

15015 wrschept. So S. L: worship. K: wurschept.

15022 wyll. So L, K. S: lyf.

15026 S: much of line written above an incorrect and canceled line 15028.

15027 Myn. S: n inserted above the line.
wayn. So L, K. S: hay.


15049 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 138v): Job.

15055 herd. S: corrected from hard.

15070 to be. So L, K. S omits.

15075 how. So L, K. S omits.

15084 can serve. So L, K. S: cawse.

15095 what. So L, K. S: how.

15105 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 139r): Job.

15125 no. S: not no.

15126 to. So L. S, K: te.

15131 By. So L, K. S: bot.

15142 wott. S: inserted above the line.

15145 governs. So L, K. S: gouerans.

15146 sand. So L, K. S: loue.

15161 Marginalia in S (at top of fol. 139v): Job.

15193 When. S: To god when.

15207 God. S: god lese.

15208 multyplye. So L, K. S: multyplyed.
 
Print Copyright Info Purchase

Book Of Job


IOB.

[JOB’S UPRIGHTNESS (1:1–6)]
 


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1175.
Job was a full gentyll Jew,
   of hym is helfull forto here.
For whoso his condicions knew
   of meknes myght fynd maters sere.
Ever in his trewth he was full trew,
   os men may in his lyfyng lere.
He lyfed ever als a lele Ebrew,
   in the land of us he had no pere.
All yf he ware to knaw
   full mekyll in erthly myght,
In hert he was full law
   and dred God day and nyght.

1176.
He honerd God in all degré
   and ever was dredand to do yll.
Fro foyles was he freke to flee
   and fayn all frenchep to fulfyll.
He had a wyfe both fayr and free
   that redy was to werke his wyll,
And sevyn suns semly to se
   and doyghturs thre full stabyll and styll.
Of gold God had hym sent
   to mend with mony a store,
Rych robys, and ryall rent.
   Myrth myght no man have more.

1177.
He had hymself sevyn thowsand schepe
   in flokkes to flytt both to and fro,
Thre thowsand camels forto kepe,
   and fyve hunderth asses also.
He had in hyllys and daylys depe
   fyfty yoke of oxyn in ylkon two
And servantes wele to wake and slepe
   in dyverse werkes with them to go.
For plowes he had plenté
   his land to dele and dyght.
In all the Est cuntré
   was non so mekyll of myght.

1178.
All yf he regned in rych aray,
   of his gud rewle thus men may red:
He lyfed full lelly in His Lay
   and to grefe God he had grett dred.
His sevyn suns, als I herd say,
   mad ryall festes ther frendes to fede
Ever ylkon sere be dyverse day,
   and ther thre systers con thei bede
Ther fest so forto fyll
   with frendes old and yyng.
Ther fader com them tyll
   and gafe them his blessyng.
 


salutary to hear; (t-note)
(t-note)



loyal Jew
(i.e., on earth)

(t-note)
very humble (low)




afraid; evil
fools; eager
glad


sons handsome


great supply




sheep; (t-note)
flocks to go; (t-note)

donkeys
deep dales
(see note)








Although
good rule [of himself]; read



feasts






 
[SATAN ASKS PERMISSION TO ATTACK JOB (1:7–12)]
 




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1179.
The Fend that is our fals enmy
   to payr them putt hym furth in prese.
Unto them had he grett envy
   and care to se them so wele encrese.
He come before God Allmighty
   to gette hym leve, this is no lese,
With tene to turment Job body
   so forto make his solace sese.
All yf our Lord wele wyst
   of all his purpase playn,
Nerthelese yett als Hym lyst
   the Fend thus con He frayn:

1180.
“Whens comys thou, tell me in this tyd,
   and whore abowt now has thou bene?”
He sayd, “Ser, I have walked wyd
   over all this werld withoutyn wene
So forto seke on ylka syde
   for syners, and sum have I sene.
Thor is my bourd to gare them byd
   tyll I may turment them with tene.”
God says, “Takes thou no hede
   to Job, My trew servand,
How he of God has dred,
   non lyke hym in no land?

1181.
“In mynd he is full meke and law,
   both sobour and sothfast for certayn.”
Then sayd the Fend unto that saw,
   “That Job Thee dredes ys all in vayn.
Thou has so clossed hym, well I knaw,
   that no grefe may go hym agayn.
Bot and Thou wold Thi hand withdraw
   and putt hym in my power playn,
Full sone then sall Thou se
   how he suld turn full tyte.
He suld not sett be Thee
   the mountynance of a myte.

1182.
“Thou makes his catell forto creve
   and so Thou rewardes hym with ryches
That he may mene of no myschefe.
   What ground is then of his gudnes?”
Then sayd our Lord, “I gyfe thee leve
   of all his mobylles more and lese;
Bot loke that thou no malyce meve
   his body to do any dystrese.
I graunt thee power playn
   of all his erthly gud.”
Then was the Fend full fayn
   and fast fro God he yode.
 

(i.e., Satan)
injure; the throng; (see note)

sadness

lie; (see note)
injury
end
Even though; knew well

pleased
ask; (t-note)


From where


without doubt

sinners
game to cause; wait







low
truthful
those words

protected
against
if

(t-note)
very quickly

value of a mite


grow

(t-note)


movable goods
stir up




went

 
[JOB LOSES HIS CHILDREN AND HIS RICHES (1:13–22)]
 

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1183.
So when tho two ware fayren in twene,
   the Fend sone putt furth his power.
Job chylder then a howse within
   ware bresed to ded and broyght on bere.
Sythyn all his bestes he wald not blyn
   to slo them and his servandes sere.
And how this batell all con begyn,
   berys wyttenese mony a messynger
That unto Job con tell,
   syghand with sympyll chere,
How all this fayre befell.
   Who wyll take hede may lere.

1184.
Fyrst com in on, wepand with wogh,
   to Job whore he in blys con byd:
“Thin oxin went in wayn and plogh;
   thin asses pasturd them besyd.
Com folk fro Saba and theyn them drogh
   and slogh thin hyne, is not to hyd.
I wan away with noy enogh
   to tell thee tythynges in this tyd.”
Unethes had he thus sayd
   when another com in
With a full balfull brayd,
   and thus he con begyn.

1185.
“A, ser,” he sayd, “to me take tent,
   for I may tell of mekyll tene.
Thi sheperds and thi shepe ar shent,
   and all ther welth is wastyd clene.
A sodan fyre was on them sent,
   so brym before had never bene.
To bare bones all ar thei brent,
   bot I that was not nere them sene,
I com thee forto tell
   how all this tene betyd.”
Then langer he wold not dwell,
   bot sone com in the thryd.

1186.
“Ser,” he sayd, “our yll enmyse,
   the Caldews, that we ever hath dryd,
Thei come with thre grett cumpanys
   of men of armys in yrne cled.
The camels all withoutyn price
   have thei tone and furth with them led,
And sloyn thi servantes in the sam wyse
   bot me allon, that fro them fled.
I was full fayn to fle
   and sythyn full fast to go
Hyder at tell to thee
   of all this were and wo.”

1187.
The ferth com then with febyll chere,
   the hardest hap in hand had he.
“Alas,” he sayd, “for sorows sere,
   that I suld ever sych syghtys se!
Thi sevyn suns and thre doyghturs dere
   ar ded, therfor full wo is me.
I sall thee say on what manere,
   for now ther may no mendes be.
Thei spake in certayn space
   to ete and drynke togeydder
In the eldest brother place,
   and ylkon come thei ydder.

1188.
“And als thei ware within the wonys,
   sett at ther fest full fayr and fast,
A wynd com on them grett for the noyns
   and all the howse sone down yt cast.
Yt bressed the barns both flesch and bons
   so that thei myght no langer last.
I fled and was full wyll of wons
   tyll I was fro the perels past.
And, ser, sen thus is kend,
   I red yow werke als wyse.
Grett mornyng may not amend
   wher no relefe may ryse.”

1189.
When Job had herd of all this care
   and saw yt myght no bettur be,
His sorows ware so sere and sare
   that non for syte may on hym see.
He rafe his cott and rent his hare,
   swylke hevenes in hert had he.
Full well he wyst tho werkkes ware
   of the Fend and of his fals meneye.
Down on his knese he kneled
   full low by hym alon,
And to Hevyn he beheld,
   and thus he made his mone:

1190.
“Lord God,” he sayd, “mekyll is Thi myght
   amang mankynd here forto knaw,
That rewls all thyng be reson ryght
   Thi ryalté forto rede by raw.
Thou dos nother be day ne nyght
   bot dewly evynhede, os Thee aw.
Thou ponysch men here for ther plyght
   at lern them forto luf Thin Law.
Thou kens me curtasly
   of my defawtes before.
I wott I am worthy
   for syn to suffere more.

1191.
“Thou gafe me of Thin awn gudnese
   all werldly welth to weld at wyll,
All ryall rentes with grett ryches,
   all folke to be tendand me untyll.
Now se I welle Thi wyll yt es
   that fare no ferther to fulfyll.
Blessed Thou be with more and lese!
   I love Thi layn both lowd and styll.”
When all this werke was wroyght, 
   als men full ryght may rede,
That Job yit trespast noyght
   nother in word ne dede.
 

(t-note)


beaten to death; biers
his (Job’s) beasts he (Satan); cease









weeping with woe
did live
went out with wagons and plows

drew them off
slew your servants
(t-note)

Scarcely

sorrowful rush



take heed; (t-note)
sadness


(see note)
such brim(stone)
burned


happened





Chaldeans; dreaded


(t-note)


except


(t-note)



fourth; (t-note)


(t-note)


(t-note)







building

at once

bruised the children

despair







sadness

varied and profound
grief; look
tore his coat; hair


(t-note)



lament





to rule properly

proper justice; ought


show; (t-note)





(t-note)
(t-note)



such things any further; (t-note)
in every way
laws; publicly and privately; (t-note)
(see note)
read


 
[JOB LOSES HIS HEALTH (2:1–10)]
 



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1192.
Bot when the Fend saw for certayn
   that Job wold not unbowsom be,
He hyde hym fast to God agayn
   to greve Hym in gretter degré.
Bot God than to reprove hym playn
   sayd, “Satanas, now may thou se
That Job dredes me not all in vayn
   bot in lele luf and charité.
All wo that thou hath wroght
   both to hym and hys hyne,
Thou may not chaunge his toyght
   to skyft fro Me and Myne.”

1193.
Then sayd the Fend, “For all this fare
   wyll he not waynd in warld to wend.
For catell wyll he have no care,
   he trows his frend wyll hym dyffend.
Bot wold Thou towch his body bare
   and suffer seknes on hym be send,
So suld Thou wytt yf that he ware
   lele lastand in Thi Law to lend.”
God sayd, “I gyfe thee leve
   of his body all be dene.
Bot luke that thou not greve
   his sawle bot kepe yt clene.”

1194.
The Fend was then full fayn forthy
   that he of Job had swylk powsté.
He mared hym sone with meselry,
   fro hed to fote nothyng was fre,
Bot blayns and bledders all his body
   and scabbes whor skyn was wonnt to be.
So satt he syghand sorely,
   grett sorow yt was that syght to se.
All folke then hym forsoke
   that was his frend before.
Men lathed on hym to loke
   and ylk day more and more.

1195.
The Fend more care unto hym cast
   to make hym wake and wyll of wone.
Thys blayns and bleders bolnd and brast
   and mad the flesch flytt fro the bone.
His servandes, that before ware fast,
   ware fayn to fle and leved none.
Bot so he was kest at the last
   in a mydyng sett allone.
He that no man wold greve
   befor for his ryches,
Now was muke most his releve
   forto inforse his flesch.

1196. 
He had no howse in forto dwell,
   ne cloghes for cold his cors to hyde,
Bot in that mydyng muke omell
   thor was his toure als for his tyd.
With a pott-scarth or with a schell
   he scraped the scabys on ylka syde.
For yll are and unhonest smell
   ther wold non buske with hym to byde.
Bot in all his myschefe
   full trew was his trowyng
That God suld hym releve
   and owt of bale hym bryng.

1197.
So os he rested in yll aray,
   his wyf turment hym more to teyne.
“Now may men se,” thus con scho say,
   “of what condycions thou hath bene.
Blyse God and dy and wend thi way,
   for other welthys is none to wene.
Thou has not plessed Thi God to pay,
   that is wele by thi sorow sene.”
“Alas,” he sayd, “for dole,
   why frays thou me with flytt?
Thou spekes evyn als a foyle
   that hath no womans wytt.

1198. 
“Thier wordes thou werkes, we may warrand,
   thei are not rewled by ryght ne skyll.
Sen that we take here of Goddes hand
   all werldly welth to weld at wyll,
Why suld we not als stably stand
   when tenys and turfurs tydes us tyll,
And love that Lord on ylka land,
   sen He governs both gud and yll.
God gyfes us here certayn
   to weld both wyld and tame
And takes yt agayn.
   blest mot ever be His name!

1199.
“Of erth I wott I was furth broyght
   naked, yt nedes not at layn,
And, when my werldly werkes ar wroyght,
   with teyne then sall I turn agayn.
To bale or blyse wheder we be broyght,
   to Goddes bedyng we suld be bayn.”
In all ther tales Job trespast noyght,
   ne spyd to spend his spech in vayn.
So, als he lothly lendes
   alon in low degré,
Thre of his faythfull frendes
   soght fere his syte to se.
 


disobedient
hastened himself
(t-note)



loyal

household

shift



shrink from; (t-note)

believes

allow sickness



forthwith
(see note)
soul


therefore; (t-note)
power
leprosy

pustules and blisters
supposed




were loath



grief
helpless
swelled and burst; (t-note)

beside him

(t-note)
midden (dunghill) chair; (t-note)


muck (dung)




(t-note)
midden muck together
palace
potsherd

sick air; (see note)(t-note)
no one would meet with him for long

belief
(t-note)
suffering; (t-note)



tormented; anger


(see note)




insults
fool; (see note)



These

Since what; (t-note)


sorrows and misfortunes happen to us


(t-note)





From dust I know
be denied; (t-note)



obedient
these

loathly remains


(t-note)

 
[JOB’S THREE FRIENDS (2:11–13)]
 


14390




14395




14400






14405




14410


 
1200. 
Thei come ylkon fro dyverse place,
   now wyll we here how that thei heyght:
Elyphath and Baladach toke that trace,
   and Sothar soyght to se that syght.
For ylkon spake in dyverse space,
   so sall we wytt ther resons ryght.
Bot when thei come before his face,
   to mell with mowth had thei no myght.
Thei saw his syte so sad,
   for bale ther hertes myght breke.
Thei ware so mased and mad,
   a word thei myght not speke.

1201.
Bot on the erth then fell thei down
   and bett apon ther bodes bare.
Thei rafe ther robes of rych renown,
   and als rude bestes oft thei rare.
Thei cast powder on ther crown,
   as foran folke febylly thei fare.
And so thei satt in that sessown,
   syghand sex days with sorow sare.
Job saw that thei sayd noyght,
   bot sat so lang alone
With mornyng as he moght.
   to God he mad his mone:
 


are called
Eliphaz; Bildad
Zophar
(t-note)


speak






(t-note)
beat; bodies; (t-note)
tore
roared
ashes; (t-note)
foreign

sighing six; (see note)(t-note)




 
[JOB LAMENTS HIS PITIFUL EXISTENCE (3:1–26)]
 



14415




14420




 
1202.
“Alas,” he sayd, “Lord, with Thi leve,
   why ledes Thou me thus to be lorn?
I have not gone Thee forto grefe,
   ne forfeytt so felly here beforne.
Why suld I suffer swylke myscheve
   of all men to have scath and skorn?
Thi mercy, Lord, unto me Thou meve,
   els may I ban that I was born.
And wold God that I had bene
   fro bryth broyght to my grave.
Then suld non me have sene
   swylke hydows harm to have.”
 


forlorn

transgressed so terribly



otherwise; curse

birth; (t-note)
(t-note)
hideous

 
[ELIPHAZ SAYS JOB HAS SURELY SINNED (4:1–5:27)]
 

14425




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14445



 
1203.
Elyphath herd then how he ment,
   and saw how he in bale was boun
And loved not God that it had lent,
   bot more to blame he has begun.
“Job,” he says, “thou takes no tent
   to wrschep God als thou was wun.
Thou makes thiself an innocent,
   as never defawt in thee was fun.
Thou was wonnt to wysch
   how we suld suffer wo.
Now thynke me wele be this
   thiself con noyght do so.

1204.
“To ruse thiself I red thou blyn,
   yt dose us harme swylk wordes to here.
Wytt sothly it is for thi syn
   that thee is sent thies sorows sere.
Sen ther wunys none this werld within
   that in ther consciens are all clere,
How dare thou so boldly begyn
   to maynten mys on this manere,
To say thou has noyght done
   slyke fellows fandynges to fele!
Man, knaw thiselfe ryght sone!
   Els wyll yt not be wele.”
 

(t-note)

(t-note)

you take no heed
you were meant to do
fashion yourself
found
teach





praise; advise you cease

Know truly
you are sent these many sorrows; (t-note)
Since there lives
(t-note)

misdeed

trials; (t-note)
(see note)
Otherwise

 
[JOB SAYS HIS COMPLAINT IS JUST (6:1–7:21)]
 


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14505



 
1205.
Then answerd Job with drery toyght
   and sayd to them that sat besyd:
“Wold God all yll that ever I wroyght
   and ther bales that I here byd
Ware both in a payre of balans broyght
   forto be wowed and well dyscryd. 
Then suld ye se yourself unsoyght,
   for all that ye can tell this tyd,
That my payns ar wele more
   and feller by sythes fyve
Then ever I synd before
   in lengh of all my lyf.

1206.
“My flesch is nother of yrn ne styele,
   ne my banes ar not mad of brase
Bot of freyle mater ylk dele
   that with full lytyll payn may pase.
And ye had faurth part that I fele,
   sore suld ye sygh and say, ‘Alas,’
For I fayr werse, I wott full wele,
   then any wrech that ever was.
And ye myght wytt my wogh,
   then suld ye fynd before
That I have sorow enogh
   yf ye make me no more.

1207.
“For so carfull sorows ware never sene,
   ne so saklese, and I durst say,
And your tales tempyse me to tene
   more then doles that I dre ylk day.
To Myghty God I wyll me mene,
   ther is no mo that mend me may:
Lord, lege me of thies carys keyn 
   or wyn me fro this werld away.
Sen servantes, frendes, and wyfe
   are glad fro me to gang,
My saule laythes with my lyfe,
   Thou lattes me lyfe over lang.

1208.
“And certes, Lord, with lefe of Thee,
   in my mynd mervayle have I
That thou wyll putt furth Thi powsté
   and muster so Thi grett maystry
In swylke a wofull wreche as me
   that hath no strengh to stand therby,
And lettes full fellows folke go free
   that mekyll mo wo ware worthy.
That suld be sene full sone
   and penauns ordand wore
Eftur mens dedes wore done,
   and nother lese ne more.

1209.
“A, Lord, as Thou me mad with myght,
   so may Thou make me to have mede,
And Thou may loyse with labour lyght
   my lyfe and all that lyfes in lede.
Bot when the Day of Dome is dyght
   men to be demed aftur ther dede,
I sall be fun befor Thi syght
   sothfast enogh for any nede.
For I wroght never swylke wrang,
   ne served never so unsele
Forto have half so lang
   so fell payn als I fele.”
 



everything I have done
these sorrows; suffer
pair of balancing scales
weighed; judged; (t-note)


are far more
more cruel by five times; (t-note)
sinned



iron nor steel
bones
frail; each part
may pass [away]
If; a quarter of what I feel; (t-note)



If; know my woe; (t-note)





such
causeless, if I dare say; (t-note)
tempt; anger
suffer
complain
no other who
relieve; these sharp pains; (t-note)
take
Since
go
is disgusted; (t-note)
allow me to live too long


for certain; leave

power; (t-note)
mastery
(t-note)

very evil people
of much more woe; (t-note)
very quickly
if penance; (see note)
(t-note)
neither



reward
destroy
in the nation
Judgment Day comes; (see note)
judged according to their deeds
found


deserved such misery


 
[BILDAD SAYS JOB SHOULD REPENT (8:1–22)]
 


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1210.
Then Baldath myght no langer byde,
   hym toyght this tale last to lang.
He sayd, “Job, for thi pomp and prid
   is thou put in payns strang.
How dere thou thusgayte with God chyd
   and deme that His werkyng ys wrang!
Thi dedes here has thou justyfyed
   als thou had never wonned men amang. 
And, sertes, yf thou had bene
   ay styll stokyn in a stone,
Yytt suld thou not be sene
   withowtyn syn gud wone.

1211.
“For thou may here wysmen say thus,
   als Holy Wrytt wytnese allway:
Septies in die cadet iustus —
   he says that sevyn sythis on a day
Syns ryghtwys men here amang us.
   What sall then wreched syners say
That ever are yll and vycyus
   and non bot God mend us may?
Sen non may helpe bot He
   our myse forto amend,
Mekly suffer suld we
   what saynd that He wyll send.

1212. 
“And thou makes proveys here playnly
   that Goddes ordynance ys owt of skyll — 
When thou thiself wyll justyfye
   and deme that thou hath done none yll — 
Thore takes thou fro God Allmighty
   the fredom that falys Hym untyll.
For dome is His forto dystrye
   both word and werke at His awn wyll.
Thou demys God is not stabyll
   to stand as hee justyce,
Or els unresnabyll,
   when thou says on this wyse.

1213.
“That thi penaunce is mekyll more
   then other folke before have feld,
Or els thi werkes worthy wore
   that thou has wroyght in yowth or eld.
I red thou sese and rew yt sore
   and beseke God to be thi beld,
Lese that thou fare no warre therfor,
   for thou no thankyng to Hym wyll yeld.
Yf God ware in gud wyll
   thi comforth to encrese,
Swylke spech thi spede may spyll,
   and therfor hald thi pese.”
 

wait; (t-note)


are you
in this way; quarrel
judge

as if you; dwelled; (t-note)
[even] if
ever stuck under a rock
judged
plenty




“Seven times the just will fall in a day”; (see note)
times
sins

vicious


misdeeds

trial


If; proofs
reason

judge
(t-note)
falls
judgment; compel; (see note)


high

manner



felt
were

advise you cease
protector
Lest; worse; (t-note)



relief
hold your peace

 
[JOB RESPONDS TO BILDAD (19:1–29)]
 




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14615

 
1214.
Then answerd Job unto tho thre,
   and mekly thus he con hym mene.
“Alas,” he says, “how lang thynke ye
   to turment me thus yow betwene?
Of my payn suld ye have pety
   that my frendes ay before hath bene.
Vengance of God hath towched me,
   that is with sorow on me sene.
And sen ye see my sore
   and castes yt not to keyle,
Yowr gabbyng greves me more
   then all the fawtes I fele.

1215.
“Ye sett my fare bot als a fabyll,
   and my wordes tell ye wroyght in vayn
And says that I make God unstabyll,
   for that I pleyn me of my payn.
I say yt is unmesurabyll
   forto sett for my syn certayn,
Bot God that kast me in this cabull
   may, when Hym lyst, lawse yt agayn.
Wold God my wordes ware wryttyn,
   that thei ware not tynt,
With a poyntyll of steylle 
   in a hard stone of flynt

1216.
“So that thei myght ever more be ment
   and made in mynd all men emang.
Then suld all wytt whore so thei went
   wheder my wordes ware wele or wrang,
And yf I ever to syn assent
   to be putt to slyke payn strang.
God knaws my mynd and myn entent
   yf ye go whore ye have to gang.
And, sertes, yf ye me slo,
   my fayth sall ever be fast
And never depart Hym fro,
   als lang os my lyf may last.

1217.
“My wytt is allway in this wyse,
   and so my trowth sall evermore be.
My Sayvyour lyfes and never more dyse,
   and on the last day deme sall He.
Then fro the erth sall I upryse,
   both bone and flesch, in faccion free,
And with myn eyne in that assyse
   my Sayvyour then sall I see.
All yf I byde in bale
   and be here bressed and brokyn,
Thor sall I ryse all hale
   when all your speche is spokyn.

1218.
“And there shal ye allso be sene
   for all youre saunttering and your saws.
And then sall I be fun als clene
   as ye that all this bostes blaws.
Ye come als men me to mene
   and seys me suffur so sore thraws,
Bot more ye tempe me unto tene.
   and God that all our conciance knaws,
He wott I have not wroyght
   so gretly Hym agayn
Wherfor I suld be broyght
   to fele slyke perles payn.”
 

(see note)
moan


pity
who


since
relieve
talking; (t-note)



doings; fable
you say are

complain


this bondage
loose it
(t-note)
lost
stylus of iron; (t-note)
on


remembered; (t-note)

everyone know wherever
right



go

strong




(t-note)

dies; (see note)(t-note) 
judge

fashion
eyes; assize

Even if I endure in grief
bruised
There (i.e., at Doomsday); whole



(t-note)
hypocrisy; words

who blow hards all these boasts
as men to pity me; (t-note)
such sore wounds; (t-note)
sorrow
inner thoughts



feel such painful perils

 
[ZOPHAR SAYS JOB IS WICKED (20:1–29)]
 




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14675

 
1219.
Sophar says then, “For soth I trow,
   Job, thou justyfyse thiself overlang.
Yf thou had never done yll or now,
   thou servys to suffer sorows strang.
For all thi werkes thou wyll avowe
   whedder so thei were wele or wrang.
Wele bettur ware thee forto bow
   and graunt thi gylt now or thou gang.
Thou wenes so all be wun
   thi dedes to justyfye.
Bot that fare sall be fun
   full fals ypocrysie.

1220.
“For in this werld werkes none so wele
   that wott wheder his werke be wroyght
Unto his sorow or to his sele.
   For, when the soth is all up soyght,
Of gud werke God dose ylk dele.
   Bot He yt werke, the werke is noyght.
And of the Fend, als folke may fele,
   full yll bargans ere furth broyght.
Sen non ther werkes may wytt
   qwylk is trew forto treyst,
Pray God to ordand yt
   and reward als Hym lyst.

1221.
“Thou hath governd so grett degré
   and had this werld all at thi wyll.
Yf thou trespast to two or thre,
   ther durst none say that thou dyd yll.
And yf on trespast unto thee,
   all had he never so opyn skyll,
Auder thou or other of thi meneye
   wold nothyng spare his sped to spyll.
So for thi grett ryches
   that God gaf of His grace,
All men both more and lese
   ware fayn to take thi trace.

1222.
“And now wyll non sett by thi saw
   als wytty os thi wordes wore.
God wyll that thou of Hym have aw
   and sett His honoure ever before.
And for thou sall thiself knaw,
   He sufferd to dystroy thi store,
And all thi guddes He con withdraw
   and sent thee sekenes sad and sore
Thi pacience so to prove
   and thi sadnese assay,
Wheder thou wyll last in love
   or fayle for lytyll affray.

1223.
“Thou may wele wytt that wrang thou went
   and thi wordes ware not wyty
To say thiselfe an innocent,
   as he that ware no wo worthy.
Therfor I rede thou thee repent
   and mekly aske of God mercy
And say this sekenes that is sent
   is for thi mysrewle ryghtwysly.
And lett no rusyng ryse,
   ne graunt of thi gud dede
Thiself thou suld dyspyse,
   then wyll God make thi mede.”
 

truth I believe
too much
before
you deserve
(t-note)


before you go (die)
think; accustomed

revealed [to be]




knows whether
happiness

does each part; (see note)
Unless
Devil

Since no one their
trust

desires





dared; (t-note)

even if; such evident reason; (t-note)
Either; company
advantage



glad to follow your lead 


message; (t-note)

desires



goods




fail for a little fright



wise


advise



boasting


reward

 
[JOB REAFFIRMS HIS FAITH; RESPONDS THAT THE WICKED CAN GO UNPUNISHED (21:1–34)]
 




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14700
 
1224.
Job then for bale began to qwake,
   swylk angers in his hert had he.
“Alas!” he sayd, “When sall ye slake
   with tene thus forto turment me?
Yf God more vengance on me take
   to make me turment on a tre,
My ryghtwysnes sall I never forsake,
   therin I hope my helpe sall be.
When ryghtwyse Juge sall sytt
   to deme ever ylka dele,
Then all the werld sall wytt
   who dyd wrang and who wele.

1225.
“Bot, sertes, ther is a comyn case
   that trobyls me in wytt allway:
A man that spendes his lyfes space
   in syn that sorow is forto say,
And to no man amendes mase
   bot dose ever yll all that he may,
And evermore hape and hele he has
   and gud enogh both nyght and day;
And he that rewls hym ryght
   mydnyght, morn, and noyne,
He has dole day and nyght.
   How ys this dewly done?”
 

grief; shake

cease
insult
[Even] if
tormented on a tree; (see note)(t-note)
(t-note)
in that

pass judgment over everything
know



certainly
troubles my mind
(t-note)

makes amends
does wickedness in every way he can
happiness and health
wealth
rules himself rightly
noon
sorrow

 
[ELIPHAZ SAYS JOB MUST BE WICKED (15:1–35)]
 





14705




14710


 
1226.
Elyphath then answerd agayn
   and says, “Then, man, grett ferly have I
That thou labours thi wytt in vayn
   and fyllys thi toyght with fantasy.
Tho that lyfes wele, thei ar certayn
   forto have blyse how so thei dy.
Tho that lyfes yll to thei be slayn
   sall wun in wo, as yt is worthy.
And if thei syn forsake
   and mend whyls thei have myght,
Thei may als wynly wake
   als thei that lyfes full ryght.
 


wonder


Those who live well
however they die
(t-note)
dwell


pleasantly awake

 
[PARABLE OF THE RICH MAN AND THE LEPER (LUKE 16:19–31)]
 



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14735

 
1227.
“To this may men in sampyll tell
   and lyghtly lere, yf yt be late,
Of the ryche man how yt fell,
   and of a lazar that lay at his gate.
The ryche wold with no mercy mell
   bot lyf in lust erly and late.
Therfor he had his hame in Hell
   with fendes foule and fyre full hate.
With fylth ther was he fed
   for all his fare before,
And the lazar was led
   to wun in myrth evermore.

1228.
“Forthi I rede thou thee avyse
   and that thou of slyke bostyng blyn,
When thou thiself so justyfyse
   to say thi payn passys thi syn.
For whoso wyll with rusyng ryse
   and wenys so wrschep forto wyn,
Thei sall be sett in law assyse
   and haldyn down for all ther dyn.
Then is it wytt to bewarre
   for ferd of slyke a fall.
Yll or wele yf we fare,
   evermore love God of all.”
 

example; (see note)
learn, even if it is late
happened
leper
speak


devils
dung


dwell


(t-note)
such boasting cease

surpasses
boasting
intends thus honor
legal assize
held
(t-note)
fear


 
[JOB RESPONDS DECLARING HIS INNOCENCE (16:1–17:16)]
 




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14760
 
1229.
Job then says, “Forsoth I trow
   for all the kavtels that ye can
That yt sall fall by me and yow
   als yt fell by the pepyll than.
For ye lend in your lordschepes now
   and weldes the welthys your faders wan,
And yow lyst nawder bend ne bow
   ne graunt servyce to no gud man.
To me ye con take tent
   and turment yow betwene
A sely innocent,
   that may no malyse mene.

1230.
“And yf yt sall be als ye say,
   that tho in Hell sall have ther hame
That lyfes in lust and lykyng ay
   and hath all welth of wyld and tame
And none anoye be nyght ne day,
   then to yourself sall fall the same.
Therfor I wold ye wentt your way
   and lett me lyg here law and lame.
And when ye part me fro,
   I aske of God this boyne,
That here come nevermo
   to dere me als ye have done.”
 

Truly I believe
cunning devices; (t-note)
(t-note)

remain
wield; won
desire neither

take heed

pitiable
intends; (see note)(t-note)




pleasure always

trouble
(t-note)
wish you
lie here low

boon

harm

 
[BILDAD INSISTS JOB MUST HAVE SINNED (18:1–21)]
 





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14830


 
1231.
Baldach brast owt with wordes breme
   and says, “Thou doytes in this degré,
When thou dare take on thee to deme
   what werkyng sall worth of us thre.
To God allon that same suld seme,
   for demer of all erth is He.
Unto thi yowth thou suld take yeme,
   and in thiself then suld thou se
That thi werkes hath bene warre
   forto deme al by dene
And febyler be fare
   then any of ours have bene.

1232.
“For thou had yemyng in thi yowthe
   and fyndyng of thi frendes in fere,
When we trayveld by north and sowth
   to seke our sele on sydes sere.
God gaf thee myght to mell with mowth
   befor all folk both fere and nere,
And sotell carpyng non we cowth
   bot comyn course of craftes clere. 
Thou had of frendes before
   swylke fee os myght not fayle,
And all our erthly store
   gatt we with grett travayle.

1233.
“Thou trespast never in no degré
   by ther tales that we here thee tell,
And forto nevyn no more dyd he
   that clerkes says had his hame in Hell.
Bot for he was of gold and fee
   rychest that in his land con dwell
And of the pore hade no pyté,
   for that defawt full fowle he fell.
And so sall all tho do
   that has here welth gud woyne
And takes no tent therto
   to helpe them that has none.

1234.
“Whyls thou myght in thi lordschepe lend,
   forto have wo thou wold not wene.
That thou was ryche, full wele was kend,
   thi catell in all cuntreys clene.
Bot wher thou auder gaf or send
   to solace the seke, that was not sene,
Or any man in myschef mend,
   ther is non swylke maters to mene.
When thou so lordly foyre,
   then suld thou have had toyght
Forto part with the pore
   and nede that had noyght.

1235. 
“Yf thou were meke and myld of mode,
   what mend that to other men
Bot so with gawdes to gett ther gud
   as he that cowd no cawtels ken.
So in thi strengh when that thou stud,
   thou suld wysly have wayted then
To febyll folke that wanted fode
   and fast ware fest in fylth and fen.
Thou suld have loked to lawse
   tho that ware bun and thrall.
Meknes is lytyll at prays 
   bot mercy be mengyd with all.

1236.
“Thou rusys thiself of ryghtwysnes;
   what favour suld thou therfor fang,
When no man durst do thee dystreyse,
   wheder thi werkes ware wele or wrang,
Bot ylka man, both more and lese,
   ware glad fro thi grevance to gang.
Thi pompe and pride wyll prove exprese
   thou has bene an yll levere lang.
Therfor aske God mercy
   that thou has sayd of myse,
And wytt thou is worthy
   forto fele warre then this.”
 

rough; (t-note)
You are foolish
judge
is proper to
alone
judge; (t-note)
pay attention

worse
altogether
worse by far



care
together; (t-note)

happiness in every place
speak
far and near
subtle argument
(t-note)

property





these
mention
(t-note)

did


those
in plenty
takes no heed





well was known

either
sick; seen; (t-note)

mention
lived

divide; poor
needy



(t-note)
tricks to take their goods
trickeries know

attended

bound; shit
release
bound and enslaved
(t-note)
unless mingled


boasts
get
dared


(t-note)

long been a sinful person; (t-note)

sin

feel far worse

 
[JOB OBSERVES THAT GOD ALONE KNOWS THE REASON (9:1–22)]
 



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14880
 
1237.
Job says then with sympyll chere,
   “Alas, this lyf lyges yow full lyght,
And wold God that ye thre in fere
   suld fele yt both day and nyght,
Or that my domysman wold apere
   my dedes dewly to deme and dyght.
Then suld ye se yourselfe all sere
   that your reprovyng is unryght,
Ne that this grete vengaunce
   is noght thus on me tone
For my mysgovernaunse, 
   ne for my syn alon.

1238.
“Bot ather yt is to this entent
   that God wyll schew His grett maystry
In me, a wofull innocent,
   to make other beware therby;
Or els for ye suld yow repent,
   that wrethes me thus wrangwysly,
Or sorow sere be to yow sent,
   so worthy wore als wele os I;
Or els unto this end
   may seknes oft be sawyn,
For falshed of the Fend
   amang men suld be knawn.

1239.
“And yf the Fend this wo hath wroyght
   and mad me to have this myschefe,
I have gud mynd his myght is noyght
   ferrer then God wyll gyf hym lefe.
And when the soth is all up soygt,
   yf God have graunt hym me to grefe,
My body he has in balys broyght,
   bot to my saule he may not mefe.
Therfor I hym defy
   and all his felows fare
And als your cumpany
   that encressys all my care.

1240. 
“For, sertes, ye sall have syn and shame
   to wreke yow so in wordes vayne,
So bytterly me forto blame
   for that I pleyne me of my payn.
And, sertanly, feld ye the same,
   to say fowler ye suld be fayn.
Therfor I pray yow hast yow hame;
   God leyn that ye com never agayn!
For your unfrendly fayre
   with your carpyng so keyn
Has made my myschef mare
   then yt suld els have bene.”
 


concerns you very little
together

judge
determine and judge
in various ways
reproof is unjust
(t-note)
taken
(t-note)



either; (see note)(t-note)


other [people]
yourselves
who chastise
various sorrows


sickness; sown
Devil






more; leave [to have]
truth

sorrows
interfere


also
grief



wreak

lament
if you felt
fouler; ready
haste yourselves homeward; (t-note)
grant

sharp
more; (t-note)
otherwise

 
[ZOPHAR REPEATS HIS CHARGE THAT JOB IS GUILTY (11:1–20)]
 





14885




14890






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14900




 
1241.
Sother says, “Forsoth I fele,
   when all thi tale is told tyll end,
Thou says thi sorow and thin unsele
   comys ather of God or of the Fend
And for thin awn dedes never a dele.
   This mater is of myse remynd,
For and thou wold avyse thee wele,
   I trow thou cowd not tell the tend
Of werkes that thou has wroyght
   agayns Goddes Commawndment,
And now wyll graunt ryght noyght
   bot als an innocent.

1242. 
“An innocent in erth is none,
   ne never was, ne never sall be,
That dyd never grefe bot God alon
   and Mary His moyder, a maydyn free.
And thou rekyns thiself for on
   and makes thee thore als holy as He!
And we wott wele thou hath mysgone
   and greved thi God in sere degré.
Sen we have sayd thee lang
   and thou no myse wyll mend,
Fayrwele! For we wyll gang;
   us lyst no lenger lend.”
 

Truly I feel

innocence

never a part
wrongly interpreted (recounted)
if you would think rightly
tenth [part]









(see note)

therefore
know well
various ways
Since; spoken to you long
misdeeds

we desire no longer to stay

 
[ELIPHAZ REMINDS JOB THAT TIME IS SHORT (22:1–30)]
 

14905




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14915






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14925



 
1243.
Then Elypach with wordes hend
   sayd, “Job, thou spendes thi spech in vayn
To say thi care comys of the Fend,
   for of that fare is he full fayn.
When thi wo at his wyll sall wend,
   that settes hym thore als thi soverayn.
Dyfye hym and make God thi frend
   and fand his frenschep forto frayn.
For thi care comys of kynd,
   yf thou thee wele avyse,
Als bokes makes in mynd
   and wyttenes, ser, on this wyse:

1244.
Homo natus de muliere,
   he says a man of a woman born,
Hic breui vivens tempore,
   in lytyll tym his lyf is forlorn,
And fylled with fayndyngs sall he be
   and with myschefes mydday and morn,
Ryght os a flour is fayr to se
   and sone wast als yt was beforn.
So ere we ylkon wroyght
   to trayvell, tray, and teyne
And sorows sere unsoyght,
   als our elders have beyne.
 

courteous

sorrow
glad



busy yourself; question
sorrow; by nature
unless you rule yourself well
As books



Man born of a woman; (see note)

Here living for a short time
lost
hardships

flower
wasted
are we each of us
travails, struggles, and grief
many

 
[THE FRIENDS LEAVE; JOB ADDRESSES GOD]
 


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14975

 
1245.
“And sen thou says thiself is on
   that never greved in no degré,
Fayrewele, we lefe thee here allone,
   for other ways to wend have we.”
Job says, “Wold God that ye ware gone
   so that ye mett never more with me.
Then to God may I make my moyne;
   ther is none that may helpe bot He.
All erthly frendes are faynt
   and fals into affye.
Now wyll I make my playnt
   to god God Allmighty.

1246.
Nunc parce mihi, Domine!
   Lord God that gyfes gudnes and grace,
Lord, in Thi myght have mynd of me
   and spare me, Lord, a lytyll space;
And of my payns, Lord, have pyté
   and teche me forto take Thi trace,
So that I myght have mynd of Thee
   to tell my counsayle in this case.
Lord, thou makes men to encrese
   with corn and catell clene
And sodanly to sese,
   als by myself is sene.

1247.
“A, Lord, sen thou may at Thi lyst
   and at Thi lykyng lowd and styll
Make men in erth forto be blest
   and have all wardly welth at wyll,
And sythyn in wo, or ever thei wyst,
   forto have evyll and angers yll — 
Sen I so lang have myrthes myst — 
   Lord, spare me now that I not spyll.
Thei have made me debate
   that ware my frendes before.
I am so mased and mate
   that I may now no more.

1248.
Memento, queso, Domine,
   umthynke Thee, Lord that last sall ay,
Quod sicut lutum feceris me,
   that Thou mad me of erth and clay
With bonys and synows semly to se,
   with flesch and fell in ryght aray
In bale awhyle here forto be
   and sythyn as a wed wast away.
Bot my saule forto save,
   that lyges in Thin awn chose,
That hope I Thou wyll have
   and lett no lust yt lose.
 

since

(t-note)
go


complaint; (t-note)

weak
trust




Now spare me, Lord!; (see note)




path; (see note)

clarify my opinion


end



since; desire
publicly and privately
blessed; (t-note)
worldly
then, before they are even aware

joy missed
be destroyed


amazed and dejected



Remember, I beseech Thee, Lord; (see note)
recall to Yourself; (see note)
That Thou hast made me as the clay
(t-note)
bones; fair to look upon
skin
grief
then; weed

lies in Your own choice; (t-note)

allow; [to] lose it

 
[PROOF OF GOD’S POWER: THE RAISING OF LAZARUS (JOHN 11:38–44)]
 




14980




14985



 
1249.
“Lord, Lazar that lay low os led,
   dolven as the ded suld be dyght,
Full faur days stynkand in that sted
   and lokyn fro all erthly lyght,
Thou raysed hym up to lyf fro ded
   and mad hym man in erthly myght.
So may Thou rayse me be Thi red
   fro dole that I dre day and nyght.
Thou wot, and Thi wyll wore,
   for fro Thee is noyght hyd,
That my payns ere wele more
   then yll that ever I dyd.
 

Lazarus; (see note)
buried
rotting in that place; (t-note)
locked


word
from the sorrow; suffer
know, if

are far more

 
[PROOF OF GOD’S POWER: THE THIEF ON THE CROSS (LUKE 23:39–43)]
 


14990




14995




15000
 
1250.
“And the thefe that on the Crose hang,
   that in lust had led all his lyfe
And manys murtheryng mad oft amang
   and styrd men unto mekyll stryfe,
Thou gaf hym grace with Thee to gang
   in Paradyse with ryotes ryfe.
And thou wott I wroght never swylke wrang
   to murther nother man ne wyfe,
Ne never manys gud I stale
   nother in stall ne in stabyll.
Why I suld byd this bale?
   This is unmesurabyll.
 

Cross

murdering of men
much
(t-note)
many joys
(t-note)
murder neither
men’s goods I stole; (t-note)

suffer this grief

 
[JOB GIVES HIMSELF OVER TO GOD’S POWER]
 





15005




15010






15015




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15025




15030




15035






15040




15045



 
1251.
“Bot, Lord, in comforth to encresse
   this wold I wytt, and Thi wyll wore,
Wheder my sorow sall ever sesse
   or yt sall last thus evermore.
I wyle not pray for pride ne pese,
   ne guddes agayn forto restore,
Bot yf thou wold of Thi gudnes
   be my frend als Thou was before. 
For whyls Thou was my frend,
   all folke ware than full fayn
Att my wyll forto wend
   and non to gruche agayn.

1252.
“Whyls I moght governd grett degré,
   all daynthes dere to me wold draw.
All men and wemen wrschept me 
   in servys both in ded and saw,
Both dukes and erlys in ylk cuntré,
   and lordes that led ther landes law.
Os I wold byd, so suld yt be
   fro tyme thei couth my consayll knaw.
And now lyfes ther no lad
   that me wyll loke ne lufe,
Bot all folke are full glad
   to put me to reprove.

1253.
“My catell cayred in mony a clough
   with mekyll myrth myd day and morn.
Myn oxyn went to wayn or plough
   with hyne to herber hay or corn.
Now have I noyght bot noy enogh;
   all folke ere fayn me forto scorn.
So all my welth is turned to wogh;
   was never swylke wrych of woman born.
I had all daynthes dere
   that men myght aftur thynke.
Now wyll non negh me nere
   for fylth and for fowle stynke.

1254. 
“And therfor, Lord, have mynd amang
   of me, Thi man ay whyls I moght.
Have pety of my payns strang
   that sakles ere to me soght.
For thou wott wele I wroght never wrang
   why I suld in swylke bale be broyght.
Bot at Thi lyst, schort or lang,
   and at Thi wyll all bus be wroyght.
In Thee I trow and trest
   that Thou my sawle sayve.
Lord, led me als Thou lyst.
   I kepe noyght els to crave.”
 


would I know, if; (t-note)


nor peace

unless
as; (see note)

very glad

grieve against me


(t-note)
pleasant things; (t-note)
honored; (t-note)
service; deed and word

lawfully



look upon nor honor; (t-note)

reproof


traveled; valley
(t-note)
cart or plow; (t-note)
servants to gather
harms
are glad
woe
wretch
delicacies

come near me
foul



always while I might [remain so]; (see note)

innocent
know well
such sorrow
desire
must
believe and trust

desire

 
[GOD RESPONDS TO JOB’S APPEAL (38:1–41:34)]
 


15050




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15105



 
1255.
When Job had thus apertly prayd,
   God, that is ever of mercy free,
Of his prayers was noyght well payd
   and unto hym all thus sayd He:
“Thi prayers, Job, of myse er grayd
   so forto make thi playnt of Me.
I have herd all how thou hath sayd
   that I have done grett wrang to thee
To make thi penance more,
   als thee thynke in thi toyght,
Then thi werkes worthy wore
   that thou in werld hath wroyght.

1256.
“Thou rusys thiself of ryghtwysnes
   als thou in werld ware never gylty.
So by thi playnt thou proves exprese
   that thou is God als wele os I.
For I am He that ryghwyse is
   and ryghtwyse Juge to justyfye
All erthly men, both more and lese,
   aftur ther werkyng is worthy.
I gafe thee power playn
   to be all other abufe.
Thou gyfes to Me agayn
   bot plenyng and reprofe.

1257. 
“Thou says thiself an innocent,
   als he that never couth do none yll,
And wele thou wott how thou has went
   in werdly welth ever at wyll.
Thou wyst never what myslykyng ment,
   for non durst trespase thee untyll.
Now rede I that thou thee repent
   and love thi Lord, both lowd and styll,
That may putt thee to payn
   and sythyn flytt yt thee fro,
And gyfe thee gudes agayn
   yf thou can serve hym so.

1258.
“For and thou had never done mys
   bot greved thi God in this aray,
Thou ware not worthy to be in blyse
   bot thou amend yt whyls thou may.
Yf thou wyll werke ase I thee wysse,
   putt thi wyt in His wyll allway,
Then wyll thi God forgyfe thee this
   and lett thee be in blyse for ay.
Knaw thiselfe for unclene
   and evyll in all degré,
And thynke what ayre hath beyne
   and what sall aftur be.

1259.
“And yf thou wyll werke on this wyse,
   graunt to God that thou is gylty.
Then wyll He graunt thee grace to ryse
   and mend thee of thi meselry.
Therfor I rede thou thee avyse
   and mekly that thou aske mercy,
And then that thou make sacrafyce
   for thi gylt to God Allmighty.”
When all ther saws ware sayd,
   then God away was gone,
And Job als man amayde
   full mekly made his mone:
 

openly; (see note)(t-note)
generous
not well pleased

wrongly are sent
thus
(t-note)


(see note)




boasts
as if

as well as I
righteous




(t-note)
in return
complaining and rebuke


call

(t-note)

discomfort
dared
I advise
publicly and privately

then remove
goods
(t-note)


if; misdeed

bliss
unless
direct you


forever
(see note)

earlier; (t-note)






leprosy




these; (t-note)

as a man dismayed
meekly

 
[JOB’S HUMBLE PRAYER (42:1–6)]
 


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15165



 
1260.
“I love Thee, Lord of ylka lede,
   that me has lerned to lere Thi Lay.
I wrschep Thee in word and dede
   in all the myght that ever I may.
Of no kyns thyng now I have nede,
   for all my wo is went away.
Bot of that dome now have I dred
   that sall be done on the last day,
How I sall answer thore
   of the dedes in my yowthe
That I have done before,
   sen tym I counsell couthe.

1261.
“What sall I do, wrech wyll of wone?
   Whore sall I hye me forto hyde
Unto Thi dredfull dome be done
   and all by jugment justyfyed?
I have no gatt bot to God allon
   to teld me under in that tyde,
And His gudnes beys never gone,
   in His beld is me best to byd.
Bot God that all gud is
   sall deme then all be dene
By rewle of ryghtwysnes
   and of no mercy mene.

1262.
Dimitte ergo me, Domine,
   ut ego plangam paululum.
A lytyll whyle, Lord, suffer me,
   that lang hath bene both def and dum,
That I may meyne me unto Thee
   and schew my syns all and sum.
And lett my corse here clensed be
   so that my sawle, Lord, never come
In the land of dole and dyn
   qwylk I wott ordand is
For them that endes in syne
   and geytes no forgyfnes.

1263.
“Lord God, that governs hegh and law,
   I love Thi sand both lowd and styll.
My wekydnese now well I knaw
   that I have wroyght agayns Thi wyll.
For I have oft sayd in my saw
   that I dyd never so mekyll of yll,
Ne never greved agayns Thi Law
   lyke to the payns ware putt me tyll.
I wott I have done wrang;
   that sayng rewys me sore.
Lord, mell mercy amang,
   I wyll trespas no more.

1264.
“And that I have done day or nyght
   agayns wrschep or wyll of Thee,
I wyll amend yt at my myght
   whyls any lyfe lastes in me;
So, Lord, that, when Thi dome is dyght
   that Thou sall deme ever ylk degré,
That I be sene then in Thi syght
   amang them that sall saved be.
For in that otterest end
   helpe forto nevyn is none,
Ne medcyn that may mend
   bot Thi mercy allon.”
 

every nation
taught to follow; Law
honor
power


judgment







wretch without hope
haste


course; (t-note)
protect; (t-note)
goodness is
shelter; dwell

forthwith
(t-note)



Thus suffer me, Lord; (see note)
that I may lament a little

deaf and mute
address myself toward

body; (see note)


which I know; (t-note)




(t-note)
words; publicly and privately; (t-note)


speech




speech I rue greatly
show
sin



honor


judgment is ready; (t-note)



uttermost
invoke

except

 
[ALL IS RETURNED TO JOB (42:10–17)]
 


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15190






15195




15200






15205




15210




15215     



1265.
When Job had thus made his prayer,
   then was his grefe all gon, I geyse.
His wyfe com than with woman chere
   and askyd hym gudly forgyfnes.
His servandes come on sydes sere
   and asked hym mercy more and lese.
Hys neghtbours and his frendes in fere
   releved hym with full grett ryches,
So that in lytyll space
   God made hym to be more
Of power in all plays
   then ever he was before.

1266.
Hys ryches and his ryalté,
   as robes and rentes and other aray,
Hys waynys and ploughys and foran fee
   were all dobyll by dyverse day.
And aftur with his wyfe had hee
   sevyn semly suns, the sothe to say,
And thre doyghturs; in ther degré
   were none fundon so fayre os thei.
He had all welth at wyll
   and hele fro hede to heyll.
He loved God lowd and styll
   als worthy was full wele.

1267.
When he was sett in this assyse
   and waryscht well of all his wo,
To God than mad he sacrafyce
   als He before had bydyn hym do.
He saw his suns full rychly ryse
   in grett degré to ryd and go,
And his doyghturs als wemen wyse
   to grett wrschep wed also.
He teched them to take hede
   in ther werkyng allway
Ther God to luf and dred
   both by nyght and day.

1268.
Then lyfed Job aftur his grett dystresse
   one hunderth wynters and fawrty
And loved God ay of more and lese
   that so his myrth wold multyplye.
Thus lykyd God forto prove exprese
   his grett meknes with messelry;
And for He fand his fayth ay fresch,
   he wuns in welth, als is worthy.
God graunt us grace to lyfe
   in luf and charité,
That we our gast may gyfe
   to myrth. So moyte yt be!

AMEN DE JOB.


I understand; (see note)
feminine cheer

many sides

together



all places





carts; imported livestock
doubled

handsome sons

found so beautiful as

health; heel
publicly and privately



(t-note)
was relieved

commanded him [to] do
(see note)


honor wedded
taught






140 years
always; (t-note)
(t-note)

leprosy
(see note)
lives
(see note)

souls

 

Go to Book of Tobias