14. The Doctors

Play 14, THE DOCTORS: FOOTNOTES


1 Then Jesus comes

2 Out of the mouths of infants and suckling babes you have perfected praise (Psalm 8:3)

3 Then come Joseph and Mary, and Mary says

4 Here ends the pageant of the doctors


Play 14, THE DOCTORS: EXPLANATORY NOTES


ABBREVIATIONS: Chester: The Chester Mystery Cycle, ed. Lumiansky and Mills (1974); CT: The Canterbury Tales, ed. Benson (1987); DSL: Dictionary of the Scots Language; Elliott: The Apocryphal New Testament, ed. Elliott; EP: The Towneley plays, ed. England and Pollard (1897); MED: Middle English Dictionary; MS: Huntington MS HM 1 (“the Towneley manuscript”); N-Town: The N-Town Plays, ed. Sugano (2007); OED: Oxford English Dictionary; REED: Records of Early English Drama; SC: The Towneley Plays, eds. Stevens and Cawley (1994); s.d.: stage direction; Whiting: Whiting, Proverbs, Sentences, and Proverbial Phrases; York: The York Corpus Christi Plays, ed. Davidson (2011).

While incomplete (see headnote to play 13), the play of the Doctors has structural and verbal similarities to both the Chester and Coventry versions of this episode, and shares a notable amount of dialogue with the York version, having apparently been adapted from an earlier version of that play (see the section on “Christ and the Doctors: Inter-Relation of the Cycles” in Greg, Bibliographical and Textual Problems, pp. 69–108). However, the portions of these two plays that are closely parallel begin only with the entrance of the twelve-year-old Jesus at line 49 (see York 20.73), making it uncertain as to how much of the Towneley play, exactly, has been lost along with the ending of the Purification play. While both Chester and Coventry combine this episode with that of the Purification, the appearance of the teachers is preceded, as it is in York, by a discussion between Mary and Joseph who, leaving the Temple in Jerusalem, realize that Jesus is not with them. Such a discussion was almost certainly part of the Towneley play, as well. That dialogue in York occupies 48 lines, and the teachers in that version share only 24 lines before Jesus enters — only half as many as in the extant (and unique) Towneley text. For comparison, in Chester, the parallel scene between Mary and Joseph occupies only 20 lines, but Jesus is already among the teachers and speaks just four lines into that segment. The Towneley text begins mid-speech, which means — given the regularity of form here — that it was likely preceded by one or more likely two quatrains from the same speaker, Teacher 2, and by one or more quatrains (again likely four in total) assigned to Teacher 1 prior to that, likely all focused on prophecy as are the extant lines. The initial dialogue between Mary and Joseph was likely no longer than its York equivalent, and might well have been shorter, allowing for an estimate of between 48 and 72 missing lines in total.

The basis for the meeting between Christ and the Doctors can be found in Luke 2:41–52, but the Gospel account gives little idea as to what they might have spoken about. Focusing that discussion on the commandments, as Clifford Davidson states, “seems related to the campaign of religious education, encouraged by Archbishop Thoresby, that was the force behind the assembling and dissemination of the Lay Folks’ Catechism and the specifying of the basic demands of laypersons’ knowledge” in late fourteenth-century England (York 20: headnote). The initial part of this discussion, though, also has a scriptural basis, namely conversation between (the adult) Jesus and a teacher of the law in Matthew 22:34–40 (and with a scribe in Mark 12:28–34; see the note to lines 115–16 below) regarding the greatest of the commandments and the summation of the law.


1 Teacher 2 (speech heading). There is no extant speech heading here, but the regular 1-2-3 pattern of speakers through the earlier part of the play makes it clear that these lines (along with at least one preceding quatrain) belong to Teacher 2. The MS speech heading for each of these three characters is Magister, or Master, a typical title or designation for a teacher — “teacher” being the literal translation of the Latin term doctor (from docere, to teach). While “Doctors” has been retained for the title for the play, the character designation used here avoids potential confusion between Masters and Doctors in a modern academic sense.

1–8 That a madyn . . . . man may go. These lines, which clearly continue a speech regarding messianic prophecy, refer to Isaiah 7:14, quoted in the second Shepherds play (9.982–84), and discussed by Herod’s counselors in two other plays (see 10.417–28 and 12.304–14; see also the final note to the Prophets play, 7.a).

7–8 of brede and lenghthe / As far as any man may go. That is, everywhere.

11 Abacuk. The lines which follow do not actually refer to Habakkuk but to Isaiah 11:1–2 (partly quoted at 8.502–03); on Habakkuk, see 8.437–38 and the final note to 7.a.

15 A wande shall spryng fro Jesse roytt. A branch shall sprout from the root of Jesse (Isaiah 11:1); see also 8.502–03 and the note to 7.a.97, above.

22–24 The goost of . . . . brede and sytt. The image — ultimately derived from Deuteronomy 32:11 and Genesis 1:2 (see note to 9.1020–23 above) — is of the Holy Spirit as a brooding ben sitting on the nest.

44 Fele prophetys have prechyd it full playn. “Fele” here (see Textual Note) could mean either “worthy” or “many” (MED fele (adj.) and (indef. num.).

55 othere tayllys to tent. That is, other business (literally, “things told”) to attend to. See MED tale (n.), sense 1a.

61–62 For in som mynde it may thee bryng / To here oure sawes red by rawes. That is, the law of Moses (line 58) may make you inclined to listen to what we recite, line by line; to be “read by row” also implies that something is correctly understood — see 22.345 and note.

71 Com sytt. As evident from lines 117–18, below, the teachers are seated together in a row (impressively dressed in furred garments — see line 224), likely facing the audience from behind a table or lectern on which books are laid out, possibly chained to the lectern, as in a medieval library. Jesus is still seated when Mary and Joseph find him at line 213.

74 Untill oure resons right shuld reche. That is, should correctly understand our discourse.

77–80 The Holy Gost . . . . heven to preche. These lines echo Luke 4:18, in which Jesus (in his first appearance in Nazareth’s synagogue since his forty days in the desert) quotes Isaiah 61:1.

After 90 Ex ore infancium et lactencium perfecisti laudem. The extrametrical Latin quotation from Psalm 8:3, written by the main scribe beside line 90 in the MS, is not given in the York version, although arguably required by the context.

111–12 I trow the barn be sent / Sufferanly to salfe oure sare. I believe the child has been sent by (God’s) supreme power to heal our wounds — that is, to ease our suffering.

115–16 Which callys thou . . . . in Moyses lare. The phrasing of the question here combines that of Matthew 22:36 (“greatest”) and of Mark 12:28 (“first”); in both of those passages, however, Jesus immediately answers the question himself, rather than putting it back to his interlocutors.

121–25 I rede that this is the fyrst bydyng . . . . hym shall hyng. This rephrasing of the first of the ten commandments, spoken by Jesus in Matthew 22:37 and Mark 12:29–30, is ultimately derived from Deuteronomy 6:5.

127–28 Ye nede none othere . . . this to fulfyll. That is, you do not need the rest of the law if you can keep just this one. See Matthew 22:38: “This is the greatest and the first commandment.”

129–32 The seconde . . . . truly. See Leviticus 19:18, as well as Matthew 22:39–40 and Mark 12:31.

141–44 Then shuld we . . . . Right as oureself. The York version switches to the second person plural after the first line (“all youre . . . . as youreselfe,” York 20.166–168). Davidson comments: “the manuscript reading is correct since he is lecturing the priests of the Temple and it would be inappropriate to include himself” (York 20n153–56). However, the Towneley version is consistent with the influential description of the Last Judgment in Matthew 25; in the Towneley Judgment play, Jesus states that, whenever kindness or mercy was extended to a neighbor, “this dede was to me done” (27.641; see Matthew 25:40).

145–46 synthen thou has told us two, / Which ar the aght. The two commandments just expounded are not identical with the first two as given to Moses, which prohibit idolatry and taking God’s name in vain, but are effectively a summary of all ten commandments, as stated in Matthew 22:40 and in lines 135–40 here. The other eight commandments are given in the subsequent lines 147–80 (at greater length than in the York version); however, in the Prophets pageant, Moses outlines all ten as listed in Exodus 20:1–17 and Deuteronomy 5:4–21, including the first two (see 7.a.50–60).

165 no thefe feyr. As SC point out (p. 538n165), this phrase seems to be an abbreviated version of one used in the Speculum Christiani, a likely source text, another version of which is used in the Conspiracy play: “thefe or thefys fere” (20.726).

167 Oker ne symony thou com not nere. Simony, the selling of sacred objects and benefits, named after Simon Magus (see Acts 8:18–20), and usury, charging interest for a loan, were both forbidden under church law, although Jews were exempt, and thus frequently employed as bankers and money-lenders to the Christian community. See also 27.527–29 and note.

196, s.d. Tunc venient Ioseph et Maria. Mary and Joseph likely remained at audience level after their initial appearance (in the missing portion of the play), but now come forward through the audience toward the stage area where Jesus and the teachers are seated. As noted in line 202, three days have elapsed since they realized that Jesus was not with them (see Luke 2:46).

223 I can not with thaym. That is, I cannot converse or mell (line 221) with them.

255–56 I shall thynk on them weyll / To fownd what is folowand. That is, I shall ponder these things well, to find what conclusions might follow; see Luke 2:51: “And his mother kept all these words in her heart.”

265 No wonder if thou, wife. Doctor 3 here addresses Mary, to compliment her son.


Play 14, THE DOCTORS: TEXTUAL NOTES


Introduction text here, if any; format exactly as it appears in the printed volume, using two "br" tags between paragraphs.

ABBREVIATIONS: EP: The Towneley Plays, ed. England and Pollard (EETS, 1897); Facs: The Towneley Cycle: A Facsimile of Huntington MS HM 1, ed. Cawley and Stevens; MED: Middle English Dictionary; MS: Huntington MS HM 1 (base text); SC: The Towneley Plays, ed. Stevens and Cawley (EETS, 1994); s.d.: stage direction; Surtees: The Towneley Mysteries, ed. Raine; York: The York Corpus Christi Plays, ed. Davidson (2011).

7 brede. MS: the word lenght (anticipating the final word in the same line) is crossed out before this word.

44 Fele. MS: fful, likely anticipating full later in the same line.

57 Son if thou. So SC, following York 20.81. MS: Son thou.

After 90 Ex ore infancium et lactencium perfecisti laudem. See Explanatory Note.

103 plener. So SC. York 20.127: playnere. MS: plene.

130 clerly. So SC, following York 20.154. MS: clergy.

133 Thus. MS: us badly worn.

146 aght. So EP. MS: viij.

165 seven. EP: seuen. MS: vij.

169 aght. So EP. MS: viij.

171 fede. So SC, restoring rhyme. MS: syb (that is, “sibling”).

173 neyn. So EP. MS: ix.

177 ten. So EP. MS: x.

182 Lord. So EP. SC: Lord. MS: this word is inserted above the line in a different hand.

206 mowrnyng. So SC. York 20.214: mourning. MS: mowryng.

238 thee. So SC (þe), following York 20.246. EP, MS: se.

250 tyll. So SC. MS: ityll following partial erasure.

253–54 Mary: Thise sawes . . . can not understand. MS: the speech heading and rule separating this from the previous speech are missing. MS line 154 reads I can well vnderstonde. SC add the speech heading and correct well to not as done here (following York 20.262), but inadvertently begin the line as hise sawes.

257 sothly. So EP, SC. MS: sothtly.

273 of youre. MS: between these words is the letter c, or more likely a partial g, anticipating good later in this line.

After 280 Explicit. MS: Explcit.

 
Print Copyright Info Purchase

14. The Doctors

from: The Towneley Plays  2017








[fol. 62r]

TEACHER 2




5




TEACHER 3
10





15





20






TEACHER 1
26



TEACHER 2
30



TEACHER 3

35


TEACHER 1


40

TEACHER 2




TEACHER 3
46





JESUS
50
TEACHER 1



55

TEACHER 3


60



JESUS

TEACHER 1
66


JESUS
70
TEACHER 2


TEACHER 3

75

JESUS


80
TEACHER 2

JESUS


TEACHER 1
86



90





95





100
JESUS



TEACHER 1
106



TEACHER 2
110


JESUS

TEACHER 3
116
JESUS


120

TEACHER 1



125

JESUS


130





135




140





TEACHER 1
146
JESUS


[fol. 63v]
150





155





160






165





170





175





180






TEACHER 2
186


TEACHER 3
190


TEACHER 1

195




MARY


200




JOSEPH
206



[fol. 64r]
210
MARY



JOSEPH
216

MARY


220
JOSEPH




MARY
226


JOSEPH
230



MARY

235

JOSEPH


240
MARY




245

[fol. 64v]

JESUS
250


MARY

255


JOSEPH


260
JESUS

TEACHER 1

TEACHER 2
266



TEACHER 3
270


JESUS

275

MARY

JOSEPH
280


 
Teacher 1
Teacher 2
Teacher 3
Jesus
Mary
Joseph

[…]

That a madyn a barn shuld bere,
And his name thus can thay tell:
Fro the tyme that he born were
He shal be callyd Emanuell.

Counselloure, and God of strengthe,
And Wonderfull also
Shall he be callyd, of brede and lenghthe
As far as any man may go.

Masters, youre resons ar right good,
And wonderfull to neven.
Yit fynde I more by Abacuk.
Syrs, lysten a whyle unto my steven.

Oure bayll, he says, shall turn to boytt
Herafterward som day;
A wande shall spryng fro Jesse roytt,
The certan sothe thus can he say,

And of that wande shall spryng a floure
That shall spryng up full hight;
Therof shall com full swete odowre,
And therapon shall rest and lyght

The Holy Gost, full mych of myght;
The goost of wysdom and of wyt
Shall beyld his nest with mekyll right
And in it brede and sytt.

Bot when trow ye this prophecy
Shal be fulfyllyd in dede,
That here is told so openly
As we in scrypture rede?

A greatt mervell, forsothe it is,
To us to here of sich mastry:
A madyn to bere a chyld, iwys,
Without mans seyde, that were ferly.

The Holy Gost shall in hyr lyght
And kepe hir madynhede full clene;
Whoso may byde to se that sight,
Thay ther not drede, I wene.

Of all thise prophetys wyse of lore
That knew the prophecy more and les
Was none that told the tyme before,
When he shuld com to by us peasse.

Wheder he be commen or not
No knowlege have we in certayn,
Bot he shall com, that dowt we not;
Fele prophetys have prechyd it full playn.

Mekyll I thynk that thise prophetys
Ar holden to God that is on hight,
That have knowyng of his behetys,
And for to tell of his mekyll myght.

Tunc venit Jesus. 1

Masters, luf be with you lent,
And mensk be unto this meneye.
Son, hens away I wold thou went,
For othere haft in hand have we.
Son, whosoever thee hyder sent,
Thay were not wyse, thus tell I thee,
For we have othere tayllys to tent
Then now with barnes bowrdand to be.
Son, if thou lyst oght lere
To lyf by Moyses lay,
Com heder, and thou shall here
The sawes that we wyll say.

For in som mynde it may thee bryng
To here oure sawes red by rawes.
To lere of you nedys me no thyng,
For I knaw both youre dedys and sawes.
Hark, yonder barn with his bowrdyng!
He wenys he kens more then he knawys.
Nay, certys, son, thou art over-ying
By clergy yit to know oure laws.
I wote as well as ye
How that youre lawes was wroght.
Com sytt; soyn shall we se
For certys so semys it noght.

It were wonder if any wyght
Untill oure resons right shuld reche,
And thou says thou has insight
Oure lawes truly to tell and teche.
The Holy Gost has on me lyght,
And anoynt me lyke a leche,
And gyffen to me powere and myght
The kyngdom of heven to preche.
Whensever this barne may be
That shewys thise novels new?
Certan, syrs, I was or ye,
And shall be after you.

Son, of thi sawes, as we have ceyll,
And of thi wytt is wonder thyng,
Bot nevertheles fully I feyll
That it may fayll in wyrkyng;
For David demys ever ilk deyll
And thus he says of chylder ying:
Ex ore infancium et lactencium perfecisti laudem 2
Of thare mowthes, sayth David wele,
Oure Lord he has perfourmed loving.
Nevertheles, son, yit shuld thou lett
Her for to speke in large,
For where masters ar mett
Chylder wordys ar not to charge.

For certys, if thou wold never so fayn
Gyf all thi lyst to lere the law,
Thou art nawther of myght ne mayn
To know it as a clerk may knaw.
Syrs, I say you in certan
That sothfast shall be all my saw,
And powere have I plener and playn
To say and answere as me aw.
Masters, what may this mene?
Mervell, me thynk, have I
Whereever this barne has bene
That carpys thus conandly.

In warld as wyde as we have went
Fand we never sich ferly fare.
Certys, I trow the barn be sent
Sufferanly to salfe oure sare.
Syrs, I shall preve in youre present
All the sawes that I sayde are.
Which callys thou the fyrst commaundement,
And the most in Moyses lare?
Syrs, synthen ye syt on raw
And hafe youre bookys on brede,
Let se, syrs, in youre saw
How right that ye can rede.

I rede that this is the fyrst bydyng
That Moyses told us hereuntyll:
Honoure thi God over ilka thyng,
With all thi wyt and all thi wyll,
And all thi hart in hym shall hyng,
Erly and late, both lowde and styll.
Ye nede none othere bookys to bryng,
Bot fownd this to fulfyll.
The seconde may men profe,
And clerly knaw therby:
Youre neyghburs shall ye lofe
Right as yourself, truly.

Thus commaunded Moyses tyll all men
In his commaundes clere.
In thise two bydyngys, shall ye ken,
Hyngys all the law we aght to lere.
Whoso fulfylles thise two then
With mayn and mode and good manere,
He fulfyllys truly all ten
That after thaym folows in fere;
Then shuld we God honowre
With all oure myght and mayn,
And luf well ilk neghboure
Right as oureself, certayn.

Now, son, synthen thou has told us two,
Which ar the aght, can thou oght say?
The thyrd bydys whereso ye go
That ye shall halow the holy day.

From bodely wark ye take youre rest;
Youre household looke the same thay do,
Both wyfe, chyld, servande, and beest.
The fourt is then, in weyll and wo,

Thi fader, thi moder, thou shall honowre,
Not only with thi reverence,
Bot in thare nede thou thaym socoure,
And kepe ay good obedyence.

The fyft bydys thee no man slo,
Ne harme hym never in word ne dede,
Ne suffre hym not to be in wo
If thou may help hym in his nede.

The sext bydys thee thi wyfe to take,
Bot none othere lawfully;
Lust of lechery thou fle and fast forsake,
And drede ay God whereso thou be.

The seven bydys thee be no thefe feyr,
Ne nothyng wyn with trechory;
Oker ne symony thou com not nere,
Bot conscyence clere ay kepe truly.

The aght byddys thee be true in dede,
And fals wytnes looke thou none bere;
Looke thou not ly for freynd ne fede,
Lest to thi saull that it do dere.

The neyn byddys thee not desyre
Thi neghburs wyfe ne his women,
Bot as holy kyrk wold it were,
Right so thi purpose sett it in.

The ten byddys thee for nothyng
Thi neghburs goodys yerne wrongwysly,
His house, his rent, ne his hafyng,
And Crysten fayth trow stedfastly.

Thus in tabyls shall ye ken
Oure Lord to Moyses wrate;
Thise ar the commaundementys ten,
Whoso will lely layt.

Behald, how he lege oure lawes
And leryd never on booke to rede.
Full sotell sawes me thynk he says,
And also true if we take hede.
Yei, lett hym furth on his wayes,
For if he dwell, withoutten drede,
The pepyll will ful soyn hym prayse
Well more then us, for all oure dede.
Nay, nay, then wyrk we wrang;
Sich spekyng will we spare.
As he cam, let hym gang,
And mefe us not no mare.

Tunc venient Ioseph et Maria et dicet Maria, 3

A, dere Joseph, what is youre red?
Of oure greatt bayll no boytt may be;
My hart is hevy as any lede,
My semely son to I hym se.
Now have we soght in every sted
Both up and downe thise dayes thre,
And wheder he be whik or dede
Yit wote we not, so wo is me.
Sorow had never man mare.
Bot mowrnyng, Mary, may not amend.
Farther do I red we fare
To God som socoure send.

Abowtt the tempyll if he be oght,
That wold I that we wyst this nyght.
A, certys, I se that we have soght!
In warld was never so semely a sight.
Lo, where he syttys. Se ye hym noght
Amangys yond masters mekyll of myght?
Blyssyd be he us heder broght;
In land now lyfys there none so light.

Now, dere Joseph, as have ye seyll,
Go furth and fetche youre son and myne;
This day is goyn nere ilka deyll,
And we have nede for to go hien.
With men of myght can I not mell,
Then all my travell mon I tyne;
I can not with thaym, that wote ye well;
Thay are so gay in furrys fyne.

To thaym youre erand forto say,
Surely that thar ye drede no deyll.
Thay will take hede to you alway
Because of eld, this wote I weyll.
When I com ther, what shall I say?
For I wote not, as have I ceyll,
Bot thou will have me shamyd for ay,
For I can nawthere crowke ne knele.

Go we togeder, I hold it best,
Unto yond worthy wyghtys in wede,
And if I se, as have I rest,
That ye will not, then must I nede.
Go thou, and tell thi tayll fyrst;
Thi son to thee will take good hede.
Weynd furth, Mary, and do thi best;
I com behynd, as God me spede.
A, dere son, Jesus!
Sythen we luf thee alone,
Whi dos thou tyll us thus,
And gars us make this mone?

Thi fader and I, betwix us two,
Son, for thi luf has lykyd yll;
We have thee soght both to and fro,
Wepeand sore as wyghtis wyll.
Wherto shuld ye, moder, seke me so?
Oft-tymes it has bene told ye tyll:
My Fader warkys, for wele or wo,
Thus am I sent for to fulfyll.
Thise sawes, as have I ceyll,
I can not understonde.
I shall thynk on them weyll,
To fownd what is folowand.

Now sothly, son, the sight of thee
Has comforthed us of all oure care.
Com furth now with thi moder and me;
At Nazareth I wold we ware.
Beleyf then, ye lordyngys fre,
For with my freyndys now wyll I fare.
Son, whereso thou shall abyde or be,
God make thee good man evermare.
No wonder if thou, wife,
Of his fyndyng be fayn;
He shall, if he have lyfe,
Prefe to a full good swayn.

Son, looke thou layn, for good or yll,
The noyttys that we have nevened now,
And if thou lyke to abyde here styll
And with us won, welcom art thou.
Gramercy, syrs, of youre good wyll.
No longer lyst I byde with you;
My freyndys thoght I shall fulfyll
And to thare bydyng baynly bow.
Full well is me this tyde;
Now may we make good chere.
No longer wyll we byde.
Farewell, all folk in fere.

Explicit pagina doctorum. 4
 









child; (see note); (see note)

from




breadth; (see note); (t-note)



mention
Habakkuk; (see note)
voice

misery; good

branch; Jesse’s root; (see note)
truth



odor
on it

much
spirit; (see note)
build; much
brood








indeed
seed; wondrous



abide
suppose

learning






doubt
Faithful; clearly; (see note); (t-note)

Greatly
obliged; high
commandments




may love remain
honor; company
hence
business
here

attend to; (see note)
Than; children jesting
desire at all to learn; [fol. 62v]; (t-note)
live; law
here; hear
wise words

(see note)
hear; read in order
learn from
know; deeds and words
listen; foolishness
thinks; understands; knows
too young
learning


soon; (see note)


anyone
reach; (see note)


(see note)
anointed; physician


Wherever from
tidings
before


words; hope for happiness

feel
fail
judges every way
young children
(see note); (t-note)
mouths; well

cease
Here; copiously
meet
Children’s; do not matter

were; glad
desire
neither might nor strength


truthful; words
fuller and complete; (t-note)
as I ought
[fol. 63r]


talks; cunningly


Found; wondrous
(see note)
Divinely to heal our suffering
prove
before
(see note)
teaching
since; in company
spread out
words
correctly; interpret

(see note)
concerning this matter
every

hang
loud
(see note)
attempt
prove; (see note)
(t-note)
love


to; (t-note)

know
Hangs; ought to learn

Fervently and well

together
(see note)




since; (see note)
eight; anything; (t-note)

worship

physical work


good fortune; woe



their; comfort


slay
nor






always fear

thief’s accomplice; (see note); (t-note)
treachery
Usury; simony; (see note)
always

(t-note)

lie; friend nor foe; (t-note)
soul; harm

(t-note)

church


(t-note)
yearn for wrongfull
belongings
Christian faith hold steadfastly

tablets
wrote; (t-note)

Whoever; honestly seek

cites
learned; read
subtle

go forth
remain; doubtless
people; soon
deeds
wrongfully
avoid
go
move

(see note)

advice
misery; relieve
lead
fair; until; see
place

alive or dead
know
more
mourning; (t-note)
advise
Until

About; at all
knew
that which we have sought
fair
sits


lives; carefree

happiness

is nearly over
hence
speak
work must I waste
(see note)
furs

therefore
you need not fear at all

age; know

as I hope for happiness
all
neither; bow


[fine] garments



(t-note)

assists

Since; love
Why do you do this to us
cause


have worried

Weeping; creatures
Why
Often; (t-note)
my [heavenly] father’s works

words, as I hope for happiness; (t-note)

(see note)
find what [conclusions] follow

(t-note)


were
Stay



(see note)
glad

Prove; youth

be silent
matters; discussed

live
Thank you; (t-note)
choose; [to] remain

readily



together

(t-note)
 

Go To 15. John the Baptist