17. The Conspiracy

Play 17, THE CONSPIRACY: FOOTNOTES


1 Here begins the conspiracy etc.

2 Lines 12–13: Sirs, follow my commands, / to prevent the breaking of your bones

3 Lines 58–60: He is so virtuous in his actions / that no living person can accuse him / of any fault to us

4 Then Judas comes

5 Then Saint John says

6 Then John and Peter shall proceed to the city and a man should meet them etc.

7 Then John and Peter prepare the meal

8 Then they eat, and Judas extends his hand into the dish with Jesus

9 Here he will wash the feet of the disciples

10 And putting water into a basin he comes to Peter (see John 13:5–6)

11 Lines 416–17: Unless I wash you, you shall fail / to share in heaven’s bliss with me (see John 13:8)

12 Then he shall pray and say

13 And he shall return to his disciples

14 Lines 530–31: The fiend heartily assails you / To make you fall into despair

15 And again he prays

16 And he shall return to his disciples

17 And for the third time he shall pray

18 You are discovered, whatever this might portend

19 Here ends the capture of Jesus


Play 17, THE CONSPIRACY: EXPLANATORY NOTES


ABBREVIATIONS: Chester: The Chester Mystery Cycle, ed. Lumiansky and Mills (1974); CT: The Canterbury Tales, ed. Benson (1987); DSL: Dictionary of the Scots Language; Elliott: The Apocryphal New Testament, ed. Elliott; EP: The Towneley plays, ed. England and Pollard (1897); MED: Middle English Dictionary; MS: Huntington MS HM 1 (“the Towneley manuscript”); N-Town: The N-Town Plays, ed. Sugano (2007); OED: Oxford English Dictionary; REED: Records of Early English Drama; SC: The Towneley Plays, eds. Stevens and Cawley (1994); s.d.: stage direction; Whiting: Whiting, Proverbs, Sentences, and Proverbial Phrases; York: The York Corpus Christi Plays, ed. Davidson (2011).

Much like the Towneley manuscript as a whole, the Conspiracy pageant has been cobbled together from several disparate sources; even the difference between its incipit (“The Conspiracy etc.”) and explicit (“The Capture of Jesus”) seems to point to different origins. The sections written in quatrains (see note to line 432 below) and in couplets appear to have once been separate plays with notable overlap in subject, written in different dialects; while the rest, including the opening and middle sections written in the distinctive 13-line 'bob and wheel' stanza and in a variety of other forms, appears to form a complete play on its own (for further discussion and reconstruction, see Epp, “The Towneley Conspiracy”). The extant whole is as interesting as it is inconsistent. Two different characterizations of Pilate have become one, while any trace of the institution of the Eucharist — the central event for a Corpus Christi cycle such as that of York, but also for the Church more generally — has disappeared. As it stands, unlike most of the others in the Towneley collection, the play clearly requires a place-and-scaffold staging, with separate areas for Pilate’s palace, the room used for the Last Supper, and Mount Olivet (with a view to heaven), as well as undifferentiated space in between.


5 this burnyshyd brande. Pilate brandishes a sword, as the same character does in the plays of the Scourging (see 19.4) and the Dice (21.51–52), and as Caesar Augustus and Herod do in other plays (see 7.b.5 and 12.155 and notes); see also line 599. He is likely standing at this point, but is seated by line 24.

36–39 all fals indytars . . . . to my sight. All of those listed here were traditionally associated with falsehood. Outriders delivered summonses and collected taxes, but could abuse that power, while “juror” was long considered synonymous with false witness and slander (see OED (n.), sense 2), and questmongers were involved in judicial inquiries but reputed to initiate lawsuits for personal profit. Interestingly, these lines are repeated almost verbatim in another opening speech assigned to Pilate, in the same stanza form (19.23–26; see also 27.270–71).

42–43 So can I well consider / The trowth I most displeas you. I can so easily realize the truth that I must displease you. That is, I can see through your lies and corruption.

78 Caiaphas (speech heading). Caiaphas and Annas (his father-in-law, according to John 18:13) have apparently been onstage from the beginning, effectively exemplifying Pilate’s “fals indytars” (see line 36 and note). In the biblical accounts, Pilate is not involved in the arrest or any prior conspiracy, which is arranged by the chief priests under Caiaphas (see Matthew 26:3–16).

120 legys agans oure law. That is, he makes allegations against our law; see MED leggen (v.1), sense 2a, which cites a similar phrase from the York play of Herod and the Magi (“legge agayne oure lay,” York 16.203).

122–25 dom and defe . . . . he makys theym hayll. See also lines 741–43, where the healing of the deaf and dumb (based on Mark 7:31–37) is associated with the healing of Lazarus. None of the Towneley plays other than the misplaced Lazarus play represents the public ministry of Jesus or the associated miracles.

126–27 And for sich warkys as he is went / Of ilk welth he may avayll. That is, for such works as he has gone about doing, he can profit from the wealth. The suggestion seems to be that he is paid for his miraculous work; however, “wealth” can refer to blessings, general well-being, or even a local populace.

150 the loth Lazare of Betany. Virtually the same line appears in the Harrowing of Hell play; see 22.170 and note.

166–67 have here my hand, / And ilk man beyldys hym as his brother. That is, I swear what I say to be true: every man defends him as if he were a brother. The first of these lines requires a raised hand as a gesture of oath-taking.

176–77 For bot if that losell lere oure lore / And leyf his gawdys he were as goode. For unless that scoundrel learns our doctrine and leaves his tricks he is as good (as slain — line 173).

180 oure tempyll. Pilate ahistorically identifies himself here as Jewish.

186 The dwill he hang you high to dry. Virtually the same phrase is used by Herod in the Magi play (10.455; see also 2.13).

191 suffer over oure Sabote day. In Matthew 26:5 the chief priests and elders advise that Jesus should not be arrested during the festival of Passover (not over the Sabbath) to avoid a public outcry; Jesus is traditionally thought to have celebrated the Passover with his disciples on a Thursday, killed the next day, and buried before sundown — the beginning of the Sabbath.

210 all youre counsell will I ken. I know all your council’s will — that is, all that the council wishes to do (as clarified in the next line).

240 Not els bot if ye will hym by. That is, I have nothing else to do here unless you want to “buy” Jesus.

257 hym that ye have boght. This line reverses the traditional phrase referring to Jesus as “him that you/us bought” (see the note to 10.366).

258–61 Yei, and then . . . . youre meneye. Yes, and then we may be so bold as to separate him from his followers and hold him here in confinement as one of your retinue.

264 thryrty pennys. According to Matthew 26:15, Judas was paid thirty pieces of silver for his betrayal; John 12:4–6 asserts that Judas was a thief, upset that the feet of Jesus were anointed (by Mary of Bethany in John’s gospel, but by an unnamed woman at the house of Simon the Leper in Mark 14:3–5, as related in lines 274–305; see also Matthew 26:6–9) using ointment that could have been sold for “three hundred pence” (according to early English translations, echoed in line 295). These details gave rise to the tradition — outlined in lines 298–305 — that Judas practiced a sort of reverse tithe, stealing the tenth part of the common purse, and felt aggrieved that he had lost thirty pence by not selling that ointment. This tradition also informs the York and Chester plays, and such works as the Northern Passion, which is often cited as an important influence both on York and on several of the Towneley plays. See also the headnote to the The Hanging of Judas, included as an appendix to this edition.

307 Sen he wate thee with sich a wrast. Since he inflicted such a trick on you. A closely similar line is spoken by one of Herod’s counselors in York 16.243 (see MED weiten (v.), and wreste (n.), sense 1c).

325 Now ar we even for onys and ay. This is Judas’ last line prior to the Last Supper; the lack of reference to him in the lines that follow suggests that he leaves Pilate’s hall to join the other disciples immediately after speaking.

330 We shall hym have and that in hy. This line, joined by concatenation to the last line of the previous 12-line stanza, begins an 8-line stanza that is followed in the MS by a long series of couplets and one of two sections in quatrains (the other being the closing section, lines 676–779; see also the note to lines 588–89 below). Omitting these sections, such that line 337 is followed by lines 624–75 (with slight rearrangement — see note to lines 624–36 below), leaves intact what appears to be a coherent pageant (for further discussion, see Epp, “The Towneley Conspiracy”).

342–43 a man / Beryng water in a can. See Mark 14:13, Luke 22:10. While the stage direction after line 357 is ambiguous (see note below), the man they follow and the man to whom they are to speak are evidently not the same person in the gospel accounts, or according to lines 344–48 (which lines are taken almost verbatim from the Northern Passion; see Foster, “The Mystery Plays and the Northern Passion,” p. 170).

351 A lytyll whyle to ese me. While “ese” could mean the same as its modern equivalent, “ease” here means “to accommodate” or “to provide hospitality” (see MED esen (v.), senses 1 and 2); see also the similar use of the adverb “esely” in the play of Judgment 27.625, meaning “hospitably.”

357, s.d. Tunc pergent Iohannes et Petrus ad ciuitatem . . . This apparent stage direction, based on Mark 14:16, is likely related to reading rather than staging (perhaps a reader’s comment in the exemplar treated as or assumed to be a stage direction by the Towneley scribe), visual representation of a “city” being unnecessary to the action of the play. The number of apparent stage directions in this section is highly unusual, yet few if any would be useful to actual performance, relative to the dialogue itself (see the note to the stage direction following line 407 below).

361 Householder. The speech heading here translates the manuscript’s Paterfamilias (on whose role see Luke 22:11) — literally “father of the family” but used to refer to the head of the household.

366–68 Lo, here a chambre . . . . I shal warand fare strewed. That is, here is a chamber that I guarantee to be well-strewn with rushes, in which you can have your feast. Rushes, traditionally used as a floor covering, were ceremonially strewn on church floors in England as late as the nineteenth century (a custom since revived in some parts of the country).

375, s.d. Tunc comedent et Judas porrigit manum in discum cum Jesu. Jesus immediately (line 376) draws attention to this act, which as in gospel accounts he then uses to reveal his betrayer; see lines 394–95 and Matthew 26:23, Mark 14:20.

382 is it oght I. That is, is it I, in any respect, that would betray you? See Matthew 26:22, Mark 14:19.

393[a] we two Jamys. This is the only line assigned to the apostle James. It may indicate that two actors should speak in unison; however, a single actor could well speak for or represent both James, son of Zebedee (and brother to John; see also line 516), and James, son of Alphaeus — that is, only one actor is needed here along with the other seven named. Three other biblical disciples (see Matthew 10:2–4) are either unrepresented or silent, including Matthew, Bartholomew, and Thomas (the central character in Thomas of India and the first to speak in the Ascension play; see also the note to 16.15).

404–05 thou shall thryse apon a thraw / Forsake me or the cok craw. That is, you shall forsake me in an instant before the cock crows three times; see Matthew 26:34. This prediction (of an action that does not occur in any of the Towneley plays, but see York 29.86–169) is repeated in lines 450–53, part of the section in quatrains; these sections very likely have their origins as separate plays, imperfectly joined with another in longer stanzas (see note to line 330 above).

407, s.d. Hic lavet pedes discipulorum. The direction, based (like the next) on John 13:5–6, appears to be a reader’s comment rather than anything related to performance; see the note to the stage direction following line 357 above. While it is clearly placed in the MS, written in red like all apparent stage directions in this play, the designated action clearly does not belong here, as the next lines of dialogue refer to preparation for the foot-washing. Indeed, it is unclear whether Jesus should actually wash anyone’s feet but Peter’s, given the lack of any dialogue to this effect; at line 435, following John 13:14, he tells them to wash each other’s feet, which they could potentially do during the dialogue that follows.

420 Ye ar clene bot not all. See John 13:10. Inclusion here of this line implies that Judas has not left immediately after being revealed as traitor; compare John 13:26–30. He is again in Pilate’s hall by line 602.

432 Now wote ye . . . . This line begins a passage in quatrains that, with the exception of lines 624–75, continues to the end of the extant play; it likely once formed a separate play, as mentioned in the headnote (for further discussion, see Epp, “The Towneley Conspiracy”).

444–47 For when the hyrd . . . . thus can say. See Matthew 26:31, Zacharias 13:7.

453 Thou shall deny me tymes thre. See John 13:38. Peter’s denial is not dramatized in any of the Towneley plays; see the headnote to play 18, the Buffeting, and the note to 25.77–78.

456–513 Now loke . . . . on oure way. This lengthy speech in quatrains closely follows John 14 in its entirety.

504 the prynce of this warld. That is, Satan; see John 14:30.

515 Olyvete. See Matthew 26:30, which specifies also that the disciples depart after a hymn, the singing of which (while not specified in the text, as can occur with extra-textual music) could mark the ostensible travel time to the next stage area. Mount Olivet, or the Mount of Olives, was the site of Gethsemane (see Matthew 26:36). The stage action that follows appears to require a multilevel staging, with Peter, James, and John at some distance from the other disciples (see lines 516–17, following Matthew 26:36–37 and Mark 14:32–33), but “beneath” (line 520) the area where Jesus prays.

535, s.d. Et iterum orabit. While such action is not indicated by this or any other stage direction, Jesus must here return to the area in which he has been praying.

552 The Trinity (speech heading). In Luke 22:43 an angel appears to Jesus to give him strength. The apparent presence here of the Trinity (MS: Trinitas) in addition to Jesus — the Son — is theologically awkward at best, but may indicate staging: the Trinity was often represented as a “Throne of Grace” figure with God the Father (here as sole actor) holding a crucifix (indicating the “bytter passyon” that the Son is about to endure — see line 548), on which is perched a dove representing the Holy Ghost.

572–76 Sen thou art man . . . . with his underlowte. These lines refer to the Harrowing of Hell, represented in play 22.

577 Wytt ye well. The shift from “thou” (line 572) to “ye” may indicate that God addresses the audience rather than Jesus in these, his final lines.

580 Slepe ye now and take youre rest. Jesus has evidently returned to address the three sleeping disciples. The scene shifts abruptly after this quatrain to Pilate’s hall, the disciples and Jesus presumably remaining in place.

588–89 For I am governowre of the law; / My name it is Pilate. This (re- )introduction of Pilate as a character suggests that this section was once part of a separate play, written in quatrains and unrelated to the longer stanzas that currently open the play (see note to line 330 above) as well as to the section in couplets (lines 338–431); Pilate’s call for peace at line 584, which now functions to draw attention back from Mount Olivet to Pilate’s hall, further suggests that this quatrain may once have been an opening speech.

599 With this I bere in hy. As at line 5 (see note above) Pilate brandishes his sword.

619 spende and spede. This proverbial expression means “expend yourselves and prosper” — “spend” can refer to exhaustion or bloodshed as well as simple expenditure of energy.

624 Malchus. Malchus is named as a servant of the high priest in John 18:10. See also note to lines 324–36 below.

624–36 Sir . . . . thay be light. This stanza appears to be misplaced, given the reference in line 628 to “Crist that prophett” a full stanza before Soldier 2 explains that “Men call hym Crist” (line 642). In the hypothetical reconstruction of the Conspiracy play with quatrains and couplets eliminated (see the headnote, and the note to 330 above), this stanza (reattributed to Soldier 2 rather than, uniquely, to Malchus miles — “Malchus the soldier” — as in the MS) follows rather than precedes the next two concatenated stanzas, and immediately precedes what becomes Pilate’s closing speech (lines 663–75).

637 pall. The term refers to fine clothing, possibly in royal purple; see note to 16.145.

656 thre knyghtys. The proposed reconstruction of the Conspiracy play (see the headnote, and the note to 330 above) that excludes the couplets and quatrains requires only two soldiers; this line could originally have read “two knyghtys.”

663 Now, curtes kasers of Kamys kyn. Now, courteous kaisers of Cain’s kin. In the Judgment play, Jesus addresses “ye cursid catyfs of Kames kyn” (27.648). A K spelling for this name is also used in the parallel line from the York Doomsday pageant (“Kaymes,” see York 47.317), but not in the Towneley or York plays of Cain and Abel.

707 byd hym do thee right. Bid him make you right — that is, heal you. Peter here cuts off Malchus’ ear with a sword; see John 18:10.

715 In nomine patris. Jesus (the Son) here uses only the first part of the usual Trinitarian formula (involving the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; see for example 15.185–90 and note).

741–43 From dede to lyfe . . . . salfyd from sare. See the note to lines 122–25, above.

742 Sen stalkyd stylly bi the see-swoghe. That is, he then walked silently on the rushing sea. This line apparently refers to Jesus’ walking on the Sea of Galilee (see for example John 6:16–21) and contrasts Jesus’ stillness with the storm, a swoghe or sough (MED swough, (n.1)) being a rushing sound as of wind or water. However, this event happens before rather than after the raising of Lazarus in John’s gospel (the sole source for the Lazarus episode; see John 11), contrary to what these lines imply.

766 He has the rewll of holy kyrk. Caiaphas was likely commonly costumed much as a medieval archbishop would be.

772 Step furth in the wenyande. The “waniand” or waning moon was considered unlucky; the phrase is a common mild curse. See MED waning(e (ger.), sense 3c. See 9.585 and note to 2.227–29.

778–79 Till thou com . . . shall no man. Malchus does not appear in the Buffeting play involving “Syr Cayphas,” which follows in the MS sequence.


Play 17, THE CONSPIRACY: TEXTUAL NOTES


[SC’s edition of this play includes an unusual number of inadvertent formatting errors, such as speech headings included as part of the dialogue and lines joined to the wrong stanza, correctly placed here but otherwise unnoted; MS as usual marks some rhymes but no stanza divisions.]

ABBREVIATIONS: EP: The Towneley Plays, ed. England and Pollard (EETS, 1897); Facs: The Towneley Cycle: A Facsimile of Huntington MS HM 1, ed. Cawley and Stevens; MED: Middle English Dictionary; MS: Huntington MS HM 1 (base text); SC: The Towneley Plays, ed. Stevens and Cawley (EETS, 1994); s.d.: stage direction; Surtees: The Towneley Mysteries, ed. Raine; York: The York Corpus Christi Plays, ed. Davidson (2011).

Before 1 Incipit Conspiracio etc. So SC. MS has c with an abbreviation mark after conspiracio.

9 onys. So EP, SC. MS: ony; the rest of the word has been cropped with the edge of the page.

22 worthy. So EP, SC. MS: wor; the rest of word is cropped.

34 And. MS: another hand has faintly written what appears to be a th in the margin just before this word.

36 indytars. So EP, SC. MS: indydytars.

76 spech. So SC. MS: shech.

77 And overcom everylkone. MS: a space has been left just prior to this line (where two lines are normally written as one), evidently for the missing twelfth line of a regular 13-line stanza, but just prior to a group of (likewise regular) twelve-line stanzas.

113 Wherfor. MS: the r1 is inserted above the line.

124 harmes. So EP, SC. MS: hames.

142 be there. MS: the word þer is crossed out between these words.

147 rightwysnes. So SC. MS: rightwytnes.

171 his. MS: the malformed s is written in darker ink over a smudge.

200 Go. MS: a T is crossed out before this, at the beginning of the line.

224 twenty. So EP. MS: xx.

264 thryrty. MS: xxx.

302 thre. So EP. MS: iij.

337 so. MS: the s is overwritten (as are several other words and letters on this page, due to faded ink) and disfigured.

368 warand fare strewed. So EP. SC: warand it fare strewed. The word it is barely visible in MS, having apparently been erased.

368, s.d. Johannes et Petrus. MS: the entire stage direction is written in red, like others here, but with the s of Johannes and the r of Petrus overwritten in black.

374 Commys. MS: the abbreviation sign for ys is overwritten with an e.

375, s.d. Judas porrigit manum in discum cum Jhesu. MS: the entire stage direction is written in red but with the first three of these words and the h (with abbreviation mark) of Ihu overwritten in black.

379 shall me betray. So EP, SC. MS: shall betray.

380 Lord, whoever that be may. MS: Dere master, is it oght I? (see line 382) written previous to this line, but crossed out in red.

386 am I oght. So SC. MS: am oght with a faint line in between.

388 is it oght I. So SC. MS: is oght I.

392 hight. MS: t inserted above the line.

410 Peter (speech heading). MS: Petrus written in red over an erasure.

503 speake. So EP, SC. MS: spke, with ea inserted above the line (with a caret mark below) in a different hand.

521 fowndyng. So SC. MS: fowdyng.

538 If this. So EP, SC. MS: If in left margin before This in the same hand.

562 With hym to dwell withoutten dome. MS: in the bottom margin below this line a later hand has written Indenture; toward the left margin are two parallel rows of four dots.

570 stevend. SC: steuend. MS: steuen.

584 carles. So EP, SC. MS: cales, with r inserted above the line (with a caret mark below) in a different hand.

618 both brede. MS: le (anticipating lengthe, later in this line) is crossed out between these words.

619 spende. MS: the p is overwritten and disfigured.

669 myghtfull. So SC. MS: myghfull.

740 It was tyll us greatt woghe. MS: above this line, vertically in the top margin, a later hand has written what appears to be Spigart.

756 Wold ye all assent to me. MS: an uncancelled red rule divides this line (and the three that follow) from the previous speech, but tercius — the beginning of a speech heading for an otherwise non-existent Soldier 3 — has been crossed out to the right of that line.

 
Print Copyright Info Purchase

17. The Conspiracy

from: The Towneley Plays  2017



















[fol. 67r]

PILATE



5




10





15




20




25





30




35





[fol. 67v]
41



45




50





55




60




65





70




75



CAIAPHAS

80




85





ANNAS
91


PILATE
95




100


CAIAPHAS


105
ANNAS



PILATE
111




115
CAIAPHAS



120


ANNAS


125




PILATE
131



CAIAPHAS
135




PILATE
141


ANNAS
145



PILATE

SOLDIER 1
151


SOLDIER 2
155



ANNAS

160



PILATE
165
CAIAPHAS




PILATE
171



SOLDIER 1
175


[fol. 68v]

PILATE
181
SOLDIER 2


185

PILATE



CAIAPHAS
191


ANNAS
195
PILATE




JUDAS

CAIAPHAS
201
JUDAS

PILATE
205
JUDAS

ANNAS


JUDAS
211
ANNAS

PILATE
215


CAIAPHAS

220


JUDAS

PILATE
225
JUDAS



PILATE
231
JUDAS


ANNAS
235
JUDAS

PILATE

JUDAS
241
CAIAPHAS


245

ANNAS



JUDAS
251


CAIAPHAS
255



ANNAS

260

PILATE

JUDAS
265





ANNAS
271
JUDAS


275




280





285




290





295




300




305

PILATE



ANNAS
311

JUDAS
[fol. 69v]
315



PILATE

320

CAIAPHAS

JUDAS
325
ANNAS




PILATE
331



335
SOLDIER 1




JOHN

JESUS
341



345




350




PETER
356






360

HOUSEHOLDER


365







JOHN
371
JESUS


375



[fol. 70r]
JUDAS
JESUS

PETER
381

JESUS
JOHN
JESUS
ANDREW
JESUS
SIMON
JESUS
PHILIP
JESUS
THADDEUS
JAMES
JESUS

395
JUDAS
JESUS


JOHN
401
PETER

JESUS
405










PETER
411
JESUS

PETER
415
JESUS

PETER

JESUS
421



425
[fol. 70v]



430





435






440





445



PETER

JESUS
451



PETER
455

JESUS




460





465





470





475






480





485





490




[fol. 71r]
495






500





505





510





515






520







525







530





535










540







545





550


THE TRINITY


555






560




[fol. 71v]
565





570





575






JESUS
581



PILATE
585





590





595






600





605



JUDAS

610


PILATE

614
JUDAS

PILATE




[fol. 72r]
621



MALCHUS
625




630




635


SOLDIER 2


640




645





SOLDIER 1
651



655




660



PILATE

665




670




675

JESUS




680




JUDAS
685



JESUS

690



SOLDIER 2
JESUS
695


SOLDIER 1

JESUS

MALCHUS
701



PETER
705



MALCHUS

710


JESUS


715

MALCHUS




JESUS
721




725





730


SOLDIER 2

SOLDIER 1
735

PILATE




[fol. 73r]
741




745
SOLDIER 2


SOLDIER 1

PILATE
751

MALCHUS


755






PILATE
761
MALCHUS


PILATE
765





SOLDIER 2
771

MALCHUS


775







 
Pilate
Caiaphas
Annas
Soldier 1
Soldier 2
Judas
John
Jesus
Peter
Householder
Andrew
Simon
Philip
Thaddeus
James
The Trinity
Malchus

Incipit conspiracio etc. 1

Peas, carles, I commaunde.
Unconand I call you.
I say stynt and stande
Or foull myght befall you
Fro this burnyshyd brande.
Now when I behald you
I red ye be shunand,
Or els the dwill skald you
At onys.
I am kyd as men knawes
Leyf leder of lawes;
Seniours, seke to my sawes
For bryssyng of youre bonys. 2

Ye wote not wel, I weyn,
What wat is commen to the towne
So comly cled and cleyn:
A rewler of great renowne,
In sight if I were seyn,
The granser of great Mahowne.
My name Pylate has beyn;
Was never kyng with crowne
More worthy.
My wysdom and my wytt
In sete here as I sytt,
Was never none lyke it
My dedys thus to dyscry.

For I am he that may
Make or mar a man,
Myself if I it say.
As men of cowrte now can
Supporte a man today,
To-morn agans hym than,
On both parties thus I play
And fenys me to ordan
The right,
Bot all fals indytars,
Questmangers and jurers,
And all thise fals outrydars
Ar welcom to my sight.

More nede had I never
Of sich servand, now I say you,
So can I well consider
The trowth I most displeas you,
And therfor com I hedyr.
Of peas therfor I pray you.
Ther is a lurdan ledyr
I wold not shuld dysmay you
Abowtt.
A prophete is he prasyd
And great unright has rasyd,
Bot be my banys her blasid
His deth is dight, no dowtt.

He prechys the pepyll here,
That fature, fals Jesus,
That if he lyf a yere
Dystroy oure law must us.
And yit I stand in fere:
So wyde he wyrkys vertus
No fawt can on hym bere
No lyfand leyde tyll us, 3
Bot sleyghtys
Agans hym shall be soght
That all this wo has wroght.
Bot on his bonys it shall be boght;
So shall I venge oure rightys.

That fatoure says that thre
Shuld ever dwell in oone godhede,
That ever was and shall be
Sothfast in manhede.
He says of a madyn born was he
That never toke mans sede,
And that hisself shall dy on tre
And mans sawll out of preson lede.
Let hym alone;
If this be true in deyd
His spech shall spryng and sprede
And overcom everylkone.

Syr Pilate, prynce of mekyll price
That prevyd is withoutten pere,
And lordyngys that oure laws in lyse,
On oure law now must us lere
And of oure warkys we must be wyse,
Or els is all oure welthe in were.
Therfor say sadly youre avyse
Of hedus harmes that we have here
Towchyng that tratoure strang
That makys this beleyf,
For if he may thus furth gang
It will over-greatly grefe.

Sir, oure folk ar so afrayd
Thrugh lesyns he losys oure lay,
Som remedy must be rayd
So that he weynd not thus away.
Now certan, syrs, this was well sayd,
And I assent right as ye say,
Som prevay poynt to be purvayd
To mar his myght if we may.
And therfor, sirs, in this present,
What poynt so were to prase
Let all be at assent.
Let se what ilk man says.

Sir, I have sayde you here beforne:
His soteltyes and grefys to sare,
He turnes oure folk both even and morne
And ay makys mastrés mare and mare.
Sir, if he skape it were great skorne;
To spyll hym tyte we will not spare.
For if oure lawes were thus-gatys lorne
Men wold say it were lake of lare.
For certan, syrs, ye say right weyll
For to wyrk witterly;
Bot yit som fawt must we feyll
Wherfor that he shuld dy.

And therfor, sirs, let se youre saw,
For what thyng we shuld hym slo.
Sir, I can rekyn you on a raw
A thowsand wonders and well moo,
Of crokyd men that we well knaw
How graythly that he gars them go,
And ever he legys agans oure law,
Tempys oure folk and turnys us fro.

Lord, dom and defe in oure present
Delyvers he by downe and dayll;
What hurtys or harmes thay hent,
Full hastely he makys theym hayll.
And for sich warkys as he is went
Of ilk welth he may avayll,
And unto us he takys no tent,
Bot ilk man trowes unto his tayll.
Yei, dewill, and dos he thus
As ye well bere wytnes?
Sich fawte fall to us
Be oure dom for to redres.

And also, syr, I have hard say
Another noy that neghys us nere:
He will not kepe oure Sabate day
That holy shuld be haldyn here,
Bot forbedys far and nere
To wyrk at oure bydyng.
Now by Mahowns bloode so dere
He shall aby this bowrdyng.
What dewill will he be there?
This hold I great hethyng.
Nay, nay, well more is ther:
He callys hymself hevens kyng,

And says that he is so myghty
All rightwysnes to rewll and red.
By Mahowns blood that shall he aby
With bytter baylls or I ett bred.
Lord, the loth Lazare of Betany
That lay stynkand in a sted
Up he rasyd bodely
The fourt day after he was ded.
And for that he hym rasyd
That had lyne dede so long a space
The people hym full mekyll prasyd
Over all in every place.

Emangys the folke has he the name
That he is Godys son and none els,
And hisself says the same,
That his fader in heven dwelles,
That he shall rewll both wyld and tame;
Of all sich maters thus he mels.
This is the dwylls payn.
Who trowys sich talys as he tels?
Yis, lord, have here my hand,
And ilk man beyldys hym as his brother;
Sich whaynt cautelys he can,
Lord, ye knew never sich anothere.

Why, and wotys he not that I have
Bold men to be his bayn?
I commaunde both knyght and knave
Sesse not to that lad be slayn.

Sir Pylate, mefe you now no more,
Bot mese youre hart and mend youre mode;
For bot if that losell lere oure lore
And leyf his gawdys he were as goode,
For in oure tempyll we will not spare
To take that losell if he were woode.
In oure tempyll? The dwill, what dyd he thare?
That shall he by, by Mahouns blode.
Lord, we wist not youre wyll.
With wrang ye us wyte;
Had ye so told us tyll,
We shuld have takyn hym tyte.

The dwill he hang you high to dry.
Whi, wold ye lese oure lay?
Go, bryng hym heder hastely
So that he weynd not thus away.
Sir Pilate, be not to hasty,
Bot suffer over oure Sabote day,
In the menetyme to spyr and spy
Mo of his mervels if men may.
Yei, syr, and when this feste is went
Then shall his craftys be kyd.
Certys, syrs, and I assent
For to abyde then as ye byd.

Tunc venit Judas. 4

Masters, myrth be you emang
And mensk be to this meneye.
Go, otheregatys thou has to gang
With sorow. Who send after thee?
Syrs, if I have done any wrang
At youre awne bydyng will I be.
Go hence, harlot, hy mot thou hang.
Where in the dwill hand had we thee?
Goode syr, take it to no grefe,
For my menyng it may avayll.
Wé, lad, thou shuld ask lefe
To com in sich counsayll.

Sir, all youre counsell will I ken:
Ye mene my master for to take.
Aha, here is oone of his men
That thus unwynly gars us wake.
La hand on hym and hurl hym then
Emangys you for his master sake,
For we have maters mo then ten
That well more myster were to make.
Set on hym buffettys sad
Sen he sich mastrys mase,
And teche ye sich a lad
To profer hym in sich a place.

Sir, my profer may both pleas and pay
To all the lordys in this present.
Wé, go hens in twenty dwill way.
We have no tome thee for to tent.
Yis, the profete that has lost youre lay
By wonder warkys as he is went,
If ye will sheynd hym as ye say,
To sell hym you I wyll assent.
A, syr, hark, what says thou?
Let se, and shew thi skyll.
Sir, a bargan bede I you;
By it if ye will.

What is thi name, do tell in hy,
If we may wit if thou do wrang.
Judas Scarioth, so hight I,
That with the profet has dwellyd lang.
Sir, thou art welcom, witterly.
Say what thou will us here emang.
Not els bot if ye will hym by;
Do say me sadly or I gang.
Yis, freynd, in fathe will we
Noght els bot hartely say
How that bargan may be
And we shall make thee pay.

Judas, for to hold thee hayll
And for to fell all fowll defame
Looke that thou may avow thi sayll,
Then may thou be withoutten blame.
Sir, of my teyn gyf ye never tayll
So that ye have hym here at hame.
His bowrdyng has me broght in bayll,
And certys hisself shal have the same.
Sir Pylate, tentys heretyll
And lightly leyf it noght;
Then may ye do youre wyll
Of hym that ye have boght.

Yei, and then may we be bold
Fro all the folk to hald hym fre
And hald hym hard with us in hold,
Right as oone of youre meneye.
Now, Judas, sen he shal be sold,
How lowfes thou hym, belyfe let se.
For thryrty pennys truly told,
Or els may not that bargan be.
So mych gart he me lose
Malycyusly and yll;
Therfor ye shall have chose
To by or let be styll.

Gart he thee lose? I pray thee, why?
Tell us now pertly or thou pas.
I shall you say, and that in hy,
Every word right as it was.
In Symon house with hym sat I
With othere meneye that he has.
A woman cam to company
Callyng hym “Lord,” sayng “alas”
For synnes that she had wroght;
She wepyd sore always,
And an oyntment she broght
That precyus was to prayse.

She weshyd hym with hir terys weytt
And sen dryed hym with hir hare.
This fare oyntment hir bale to beytt
Apon his hede she put it thare
That it ran all abowte his feytt.
I thoght it was a ferly fare;
The house was full of odowre sweytt.
Then to speke myght I not spare,
For certys I had not seyn
None oyntment half so fyne;
Therat my hart had teyn
Sich tresoure for to tyne.

I sayd it was worthy to sell
Thre hundreth pens in oure present
For to parte poore men emell,
Bot will ye se wherby I ment?
The tent parte, truly to tell,
To take to me was myne intent.
For of the tresure that to us fell
The tent parte ever with me went,
And if thre hundreth be right told
The tent parte is even thryrty;
Right so he shal be sold.
Say if ye will hym by.

Now for certan, syr, thou says right wele,
Sen he wate thee with sich a wrast,
For to shape hym som uncele.
And for his bost be not abast.
Sir, all thyn askyng, everydele,
Here shall thou hafe, therof be trast;
Bot looke that we no falshede fele.
Syr, with a profe may ye frast:
All that I have here hight
I shall fulfill in dede,
And well more at my myght
In tyme when I se nede.

Judas, this spekyng must be spar,
And neven it never nyght ne day;
Let no man wyt where that we war
For ferdnes of a fowll enfray.
Sir, therof let us moyte no mare.
We hold us payde; take ther thi pay.
This gart he me lose lang are;
Now ar we even for onys and ay.
This forwarde will not fayll;
Therof we may be glad.
Now were the best counsayll
In hast that we hym had.

We shall hym have, and that in hy,
Ful hastely here in this hall.
Sir knyghtys that ar of dede dughty,
Stynt never in stede ne stall,
Bot looke ye bryng hym hastely,
That fatur fals, what so befall.
Sir, be not abast therby,
For as ye byd so wyrk we shall.

Tunc dicet sanctus Johannes: 5

Sir, where will ye youre Pask ette?
Say us, let us dight youre mete.
Go furth, John and Peter, to yond cyté.
When ye com ther, ye shall then se
In the strete as tyte a man
Beryng water in a can.
The house that he gose to grith,
Ye shall felow and go hym with;
The lord of that house ye shall fynde
A sympyll man of cely kynde.
To hym ye shall speke and say
That I com here by the way;
Say I pray hym if his will be
A lytyll whyle to ese me,
That I and my dyscypyls all
Myght rest a whyle in his hall,
That we may ete oure Paske thore.
Lord, we shall hy us before
To that we com to that cyté;
Youre Paske shall ordand be.

Tunc pergent Johannes et Petrus ad ciuitatem et obuiet eis homo etc. 6

Sir, oure master the prophett
Commys behynde in the strete,
And of a chamber he you prays
To ete and drynk therin with easse.
Sirs, he is welcom unto me,
And so is all his company;
With all my hart and all my will
Is he welcom me untyll.
Lo, here a chambre fast by,
Therin to make youre mangery,
I shal warand fare strewed;
It shuld not els to you be shewed.

Tunc parent Johannes et Petrus mensam. 7

Sir, youre mett is redy bowne.
Will ye wesh and syt downe?
Yei, gyf us water tyll oure hande.
Take we the grace that God has send.
Commys furth both oone and othere;
If I be master, I will be brothere.

Tunc comedent et Judas porrigit manum in discum cum Jesu. 8

Judas, what menys thou?
Nothyng, Lord, bot ett with you.
Ett on, brether, hardely,
For oone of you shall me betray.
Lord, whoever that be may,
Lord, I shall never thee betray.
Dere master, is it oght I?
Nay thou, Peter, certanly.
Master, is oght I he then?
Nay, for trowth, John, I thee ken.
Master, am I oght that shrew?
Nay, forsothe, thou Andrew.
Master, then is it oght I?
Nay thou, Simon, securly.
Is it oght I that shuld do that dede?
Nay, Philyp, withoutten drede.
Was it oght I that hight Thadee?
Or we two Jamys?
                             Nay, none of you is he,
Bot he that ett with me in dysh;
He shall my body betray, iwys.
What then, wene ye that I it am?
Thou says sothe; thou berys the blame.
Ichon of you shall this nyght
Forsake me, and fayn he myght.
Nay, certys, God forbeyd
That ever shuld we do that deyd.
If all, master, forsake thee,
Shall I never fro thee fle.
Peter, thou shall thryse apon a thraw
Forsake me or the cok craw.
Take up this clothe and let us go,
For we have othere thyngys at do.

Hic lavet pedes discipulorum. 9

Sit all downe, and here and sees,
For I shall wesh youre feet on knees.

Et mittens aquam in pelvim venit ad Petrum. 10

Lord, shuld thou wesh feytt myne?
Thou art my Lord and I thy hyne.
Why I do it thou wote not yit;
Peter, herafter shall thou wytt.
Nay, master, I thee heytt:
Thou shall never wesh my feytt.
Bot I thee wesh thou mon mys
Parte with me in hevens blys. 11
Nay, Lord, or I that forgo,
Wesh heede, handys, and feytt also.
Ye ar clene, bot not all;
That shall be sene when tyme shall fall.
Who shall be weshyn, as I weyn,
He thar not wesh his feytt clene
And forsothe, clene ar ye,
Bot not all as ye shuld be.
I shall you say, take good hede,
Whi that I have done the dede.
Ye call me master and lord by name;
Ye say full well for so I am.
Sen I, both lord and master, to you wold knele
To wesh youre fete, so must ye wele.

Now wote ye what I have done:
Ensampyll have I gyffen you to;
Loke ye do so eftsone.
Ichon of you wesh othere fete, lo.

For he that servand is,
Forsothe, as I say you,
Not more then his lord he is
To whome he servyce owe.

Or that this nyght be gone
Alone will ye leyf me,
For in this nyght ilkon
Ye shall fro me fle.

For when the hyrd is smeten
The shepe shall fle away,
Be skaterd wyde and byten,
The prophetys thus can say.

Lord, if that I shuld dy,
Forsake thee shall I noght.
Forsothe, Peter, I say to thee,
In so great drede shall thou be broght

That or the cok have crowen twyse
Thou shall deny me tymes thre.
That shall I never, Lord, iwys,
Ere shall I with thee de.

Now loke youre hartys be grefyd noght.
Nawthere in drede ne in wo,
Bot trow in God that you has wroght,
And in me trow ye also.

In my Fader house, forsothe,
Is many a wonnyng stede
That men shall have aftyr thare trowthe
Soyn after thay be dede.

And here may I no longer leynd,
Bot I shall go before,
And yit if I before you weynd,
For you to ordan thore,

I shall com to you agane
And take you to me,
That wheresoever I am
Ye shall be with me.

And I am way and sothefastnes
And lyfe that ever shal be,
And to my Fader commys none, iwys,
Bot oonly thorow me.

I will not leyf you all helples,
As men withoutten freynd,
As faderles and moderles,
Thof all I fro you weynd;

I shall com eft to you agayn.
This warld shall me not se,
Bot ye shall se me well, certan,
And lyfand shall I be.

And ye shall lyf in heven.
Then shall ye knaw, iwys,
That I am in my Fader even,
And my Fader in me is,

And I in you and ye in me,
And ilka man therto
My commaundement that kepys trulé
And after it will do.

Now have ye hard what I have sayde:
I go and com agayn.
Therfor loke ye be payde
And also glad and fayn,

For to my Fader I weynd,
For more then I is he.
I let you wytt as faythfull freynd
Or that it done be,

That ye may trow when it is done.
For certys I may noght now
Many thyngys so soyn
At this tyme speake with you,

For the prynce of this warld is commyn
And no powere has he in me,
Bot as that all the warld within
May both here and se

That I owe luf my Fader to
Sen he me hyder sent,
And all thyngys I do
After his commaundement.

Ryse ye up, ilkon,
And weynd we on oure way
As fast as we may gone
To Olyvete to pray.

Peter, Jamys, and thou, John,
Ryse up and folow me.
My tyme it commys anone;
Abyde styll here, ye thre.

Say youre prayers here byneth
That ye fall in no fowndyng.
My sawll is hevy agans the deth
And the sore pynyng.

Tunc orabit et dicit: 12

Fader, let this great payn be styll,
And pas away fro me,
Bot not, Fader, at my wyll,
Bot thyn fulfyllyd be.

Et reuertet ad discipulos. 13

Symon, I say, slepys thou?
Awake, I red you all.
The feynd ful fast salys you,
In wanhope to gar you fall. 14

Bot I shall pray my Fader so
That his myght shall not dere.
My goost is prest therto;
My flesh is seke for fere.

Et iterum orabit: 15

Fader, thi Son I was.
Of thee I aske this boyn:
If this payn may not pas,
Fader, thi will be doyn.

Et reuertet ad discipulos. 16

Ye slepe, brether, yit I see
It is for sorow that ye do so.
Ye have so long wepyd for me
That ye ar masyd and lappyd in wo.

Et tercio orabit: 17

Dere Fader, thou here my wyll:
This passyon thou put fro me away;
And if I must nedys go thertyll,
I shall fulfill thi wyll today.

Therfor this bytter passyon
If I may not put by,
I am here redy at thi dom;
Thou comforte me that am drery.

My comforte, Son, I shall thee tell
Of thyngys that fell by reson,
As Lucyfer for syn that fell
Betrayd Eve with his fals treson.

Adam assent his wyfe untyll;
The wekyd goost then askyd a bone
Which has hurt mankynde full yll.
This was the wordys he askyd soyn:

All that ever of Adam com
Holly to hym to take,
With hym to dwell withoutten dome
In payn that never shall slake,

To that a chyld myght be borne
Of a madyn, and she wemles,
As cleyn as that she was beforne,
As puryd sylver or shynand glas,

To tyme that childe to deth were dight
And rasyd hymself apon the thryd day
And stevend to heven thrugh his awne myght.
Who may do that bot God veray?

Sen thou art man and nedys must dee,
And go to hell as othere done,
Bot that were wrong withoutten lee
That Godys Son there shuld won

In payn with his underlowte.
Wytt ye well withoutten weyn
When oone is borod all shall owtt
And borod be from teyn.

Slepe ye now, and take youre rest.
My tyme is nere command.
Awake a whyle, for he is next
That me shall gyf into synners hand.

Peas, I commaunde you, carles unkynde,
To stand as styll as any stone.
In donyon depe he shal be pynde
That will not sesse his tong anone.

For I am governowre of the law;
My name it is Pilate.
I may lightly gar hang you or draw;
I stand in sich astate

To do what so I will.
And therfor peas I byd you all,
And looke ye hold you still
And with no brodels brall

Tyll we have done oure dede.
Whoso makys nose or cry,
His nek I shall gar blede
With this I bere in hy.

To this tratoure be take
That wold dystroy oure lawe,
Judas, thou may it not forsake,
Take hede unto my sawe.

Thynk what thou has doyn,
That has thi master sold.
Performe thi bargan soyn;
Thou has thi money takyn and told.

Ordan ye knyghtys to weynd with me,
Richly arayd in rewyll and rowtt,
And all my covandys holden shall be
So I have felyship me abowte.

Wherby, Judas, shuld we hym knaw
If we shall wysely wyrk, iwys?
For som of us hym never saw.
Lay hand on hym that I shall kys.

Have done, syr knyghtys, and kythe youre strengthe,
And wap you wightly in youre wede.
Seke over all both brede and lengthe;
Spare ye not, spende and spede.

We have soght hym les and more
And falyd ther we have farn.
Malcus, thou shall weynd before
And bere with thee a light lantarne.

Sir, this jornay I undertake
With all my myght and mayn;
If I shuld for Mahowns sake
Here in this place be slayn,
Crist that prophett for to take,
We may be all full fayn.
Oure weppyns redy loke ye make
To bryng hym in mekyll grame
This nyght.
Go we now on oure way
Oure mastres for to may.
Oure lantarnes take with us alsway
And loke that thay be light.

Sir Pilate, prynce pereles in pall,
Of all men most myghty merked on mold
We ar evermore redy to com at thi call
And bow to thi bydyng as bachlers shuld.
Bot that prynce of the apostyls pupplyshed beforne,
Men call hym Crist, comen of David kyn,
His lyfe full sone shal be forlorne
If we have hap hym for to wyn.
Have done,
For as ever ete I breede,
Or I styr in this stede
I wold stryke of his hede.
Lord, I aske that boyne.

That boyn, lord, thou us bede,
And on hym wreke thee sone we shall
Fro we have lade on hym good spede
He shall no more hym Godys son call;
We shall marke hym truly his mede.
By Mahowne, most God of all,
Siche thre knyghtys had lytyll drede
To bynde the dwill that we on call
In nede.
For if thay were a thowsand mo,
That prophete and his apostels also,
With thise two handys for to slo
Had I lytyll drede.

Now, curtes kasers of Kamys kyn,
Most gentyll of Jure to me that I fynde,
My comforth from care may ye sone wyn
If ye happely may hent that unheynde.
Bot go ye hens spedely, and loke ye not spare.
My frenship, my fortherans, shall ever with you be.
And Mahowne that is myghtfull, he menske you evermare,
Bryng you safe and sownde with that brodell to me
In place,
Wheresoever ye weynd,
Ye knyghtys so heynde,
Sir Lucyfer the feynde
He lede you the trace.

Ryse up, Peter, and go with me,
And folowe me withoutten stryfe.
Judas wakys and slepys not he;
He commys to betray me here belyfe.

Wo be to hym that bryngys up slaunder;
He were better his dethe to take.
Bot com furth, Peter, and tary no langere.
Lo, where thay com that will me take.

Rest well, master Jesus fre.
I pray thee that thou wold kys me enys;
I am commen to socoure thee.
Thou art aspyed whatso it menys. 18

Judas, whi makys thou sich a brayde?
Trowys thou not I knowe thi will?
With kyssyng has thou me betrayd;
That shall thou rew som tyme ful yll.

Whome seke ye, syrs, by name?
We seke Jesu of Nazarene.
I kepe not my name to layn;
Lo, I am here, the same ye mene.

Bot whome seke ye with wepyns kene?
To say thee sothe and not to ly,
We seke Jesu of Nazarene.
I told you ere that it was I.

Dar no man on hym lay hand
I shall cach hym if I may.
A flateryng foyll has thou bene lang,
Bot now is commen thyn endyng day.

I wold be dede within short space
Or I shuld se this sight.
Go pleyn thee to Syr Cayphas
And byd hym do thee right.

Alas, the tyme that I was borne,
Or today com in this stede!
My right ere I have forlorne.
Help, alas, I blede to dede.

Thou, man, that menys thi hurt so sare,
Com heder, let me thi wounde se.
Take me thi ere that he of share.
In nomine patris, hole thou be.

Now am I hole as I was ere;
My hurt is never the wars.
Therfor, felows, drawe me nere;
The dwill hym spede that hym spars.

Therfor, Peter, I say thee this,
My will it is that all men witten:
Put up thi swerde and do no mys,
For he that smytys he shal be smyten.

Ye knyghtys that be commen now here,
Thus assemblyd in a rowte
As I were thefe or thefys fere,
With wepyns com ye me abowte.

Me thynk, forsothe, ye do full yll
Thus for to seke me in the nyght,
Bot what penance ye put me tyll,
Ye let my felows go with gryth.

Lede hym furth fast by the gate;
Hangyd be he that sparis hym oght.
How thynk thee, Syr Pilate,
Bi this brodell that we have broght?

Is he the same and the self, I say,
That has wroght us this care?
It has bene told sen many a day
Sayngys of hym full sare.

It was tyll us greatt woghe
From dede to lyfe thou rasyd Lazare,
Sen stalkyd stylly bi the see-swoghe;
Both domb and defe thou salfyd from sare.

Thou passys Cesar bi dede,
Or Syr Herode oure kyng.
Let deme hym fast to dede
And let for no kyn thyng.

Sen he has forfett agans oure lawe,
Let us deme hym in this stede.
I will not assent unto youre saw;
I can ordan well better red.

Better red? Yei, dwill, how so?
Then were oure sorow lastand ay.
And he thus furth shuld go
He wold dystroy oure lay.

Wold ye all assent to me,
This bargan shuld be strykyn anone.
By nyghtertayll dede shuld he be,
And till oure awnter stand ilkon.

Peasse, harlottys, the dwill you spede.
Wold ye thus prevaly morder a man?
When every man has red his red,
Let se who better say can.

To Cayphas hall loke fast ye wyrk,
And thider right ye shall hym lede.
He has the rewll of holy kyrk;
Lett hym deme hym whyk or dede.

For he has wroght agans oure law;
Forthi most skyll can he theron.
Sir, we assent unto youre saw.
Com furth, bewshere, and lett us gone.

Step furth in the wenyande.
Wenys thou ay to stand styll?
Nay, luskand losell, lawes of the land
Shall fayll bot we have oure will.

Out of my handys shall thou not pas
For all the craft thou can.
Till thou com to Syr Cayphas,
Save thee shall no man.

Explicit capcio Jesu. 19
 


















(t-note)

fellows (churls)
Ignorant
cease

polished sword; (see note)

advise; fleeing
devil scald
(t-note)
renowned
Beloved ruler



know; think
person
well-dressed; clean
ruler

grandfather


(t-note)

seat

deeds; declare


destroy

court

Tomorrow; then

pretend; prepare; (t-note)

accusers; (see note); (t-note)
Questmongers; jurors
false tax collectors



such [a] servant
(see note)

here

lazy lout
dismay

esteemed
wrong; incited
But by my banns here proclaimed
ordained

preaches to
impostor
live a year

fear
works miracles
fault; bear
living person
tricks


paid for
avenge

impostor; three


Truly in manhood

seed
himself
soul; prison lead

indeed
(t-note)
everyone; (t-note)

much worth; (see note)
proved; without equal
lords on whom our laws depend
study
works
trouble
firmly; advice
hideous
Concerning; flagrant
belief
go forth
excessively offend

afraid
lies; destroys; law
prepared
goes
certainly

surreptitious; arranged


Whatever point is deserving of praise

each


subtle tricks; injuries too grievous
misleads; evening; morning
always; mischief more
escapes; insult
kill him quickly
thus lost
lack of command
[fol. 68r]
skillfully
fault; discover
Why; (t-note)

let us know your words
slay
enumerate; in order
more
lame
readily; makes
makes allegations; (see note)
Tempts; turns them from us

dumb; deaf; presence; (see note)
hill and valley
Whatever; suffer; (t-note)
healthy
such works; (see note)
profit
pays no attention
each man believes his tale
devil
bear witness
Such fault
judgment; amend

heard
annoyance; concerns us
Sabbath
held
forbids [everyone]


pay for this foolishness
What the devil might he be up to; (t-note)
mockery




rule and govern; (t-note)
pay for
torments before I eat bread
loathsome Lazarus of Bethany; (see note)
stinking; place
raised bodily
fourth
because
lain dead; time
much praised


Among

himself

rule
speaks
devil’s pain
believes; such tales
(see note)
defends
clever stratagems


knows
torment; (t-note)

Cease not until

anger
calm; mood
scoundrel; (see note)
tricks

mad
devil; there; (see note)
pay for; blood
knew
You blame us wrongfully

quickly

(see note)
lose our law
here
go

(see note)
make inquiries
More
feast is over
tricks be known

wait



among you
honor; company
otherwise; go; (t-note)
sent for



devil’s hand
do not be offended
purpose
leave
enter such an assembly

know; (see note)


unpleasantly makes
Lay; throw

more
are more necessary to do
heavy blows
makes such mischief
teach
present himself

offer

hence; devils’; (t-note)
leisure to attend to you
prophet
wondrous deeds
destroy

listen
reason
offer
Buy

quickly

I am named

certainly

buy; (see note)
firmly before I go
friend; faith
Nothing else; heartily

payment

healthy; [fol. 69r]
defeat; foul slander
guarantee your sale

affliction; account
home
jesting; torment

attend hereto
neglect

(see note)

(see note)

custody
retinue
since
value; at once
(see note); (t-note)

much made
Maliciously
choice
buy

Caused
openly; before
quickly

Simon’s
followers





precious in value

washed; tears wet
then; hair
misery to end
head; there
feet
strange affair
odor sweet
refrain

No other
affliction
waste


pence
among

tenth part



(t-note)


buy


ill treats; trick; (see note)
misfortune
boast; abashed
everything
assured
ascertain no falsehood
test; try
promised
deed



confidential
mention
know; persecute
fear; foul disturbance
converse no more

he made me lose long before
once and for all; (see note)
promise



(see note)
in haste

valiant deeds
Cease; place or position

false impostor
abashed
(t-note)



eat your Passover meal
Tell; prepare your meal


immediately; (see note)
Bearing
takes shelter in
follow

simple; blessed nature



accommodate; (see note)
and my disciples

there
hurry
Until
prepared

(see note)




(see note)




at hand; (see note)
feast
well-strewn; (t-note)
shown

(t-note)

meal; ready
wash
give; for

Come forward; (t-note)


(see note); (t-note)

mean
but to eat
brothers; by all means
(t-note)
(t-note)

(see note)


know
scoundrel; (t-note)
truly
(t-note)
assuredly

doubtless
(t-note)
(see note)

dish
certainly
suppose
truth; bear
Each one
willingly
forbid
deed


three times in a moment; (see note)
before the cock crows

to do

(see note)


wash; on my knees



(t-note)
servant
know not yet

promise

Unless; shall miss

before

(see note)

washed; think
need






Since
indeed

know; (see note)
An example; given
Look; hereafter
Each one; the other’s

a servant

than


Before
leave
each one
from

shepherd; smitten; (see note)
flee
scattered; bitten


even if

Truly


before; twice
(see note)

die

grieved; (see note)
Neither; nor
trust



dwelling place
in accordance with their faith


remain

go
To prepare [a place] for you there






truth

certainly
through

leave


Though I go from all of you

come back


living


indeed
equally



each



heard

content
eager

go


Before

believe

soon
(t-note)

(see note)
over

hear and see

love
Since; here



everyone


Mount Olivet; (see note)



soon


beneath
temptation; (t-note)

suffering






fulfilled




advise




harm
soul; ready
sick for fear

(see note)


favor
(t-note)
done



brothers

wept
confused; wrapped



hear
suffering





judgment


(see note)




yielded to his wife
wicked spirit; favor

soon


Wholly
judgment; (t-note)
cease

Until
immaculate

refined; shining glass

Until; condemned

ascended; own; (t-note)
verily

Since; die; (see note)

lie
live

subjects
Know; without a doubt; (see note)
ransomed; [come] out
suffering

(see note)
approaching
nearby
give

unnatural churls; (t-note)

dungeon; confined
stop his tongue at once

(see note)

pull [you] apart
position




scoundrels’ brawl


noise
make
(see note)

Until this traitor is caught


words

done

soon
counted

Prepare
in rank and file
covenants





kiss

show
dress yourselves quickly
Seek; breadth; length; (t-note)
(see note); (t-note)


failed where; labored



(see note); (see note)
strength and might
Even if


glad
weapons; look
great misery


make
also


peerless; scarlet; (see note)
formed on earth

knights
proclaimed

lost
luck

eat I bread
Before; place
strike off
favor

offer
avenge
struck him down quickly

allot; reward

Such; (see note)
devil

more

slay


(see note)
Jewry
comfort; deliver
seize; discourteous one
do not let [him] escape
support
may he favor; (t-note)
scoundrel


gracious

way




at once



longer


[fol. 72v]
once
comfort


deceit
Believe

regret



seek; conceal
mention


weapons





fool



Before
complain
heal you; (see note)


place
lost
death

bemoans; sore

Give me; cut off
In the name of the Father; whole; (see note)


worse




learn
sword; misdeed
strikes; stricken


company
thief; companion
weapons



whatever; to
peace

securely; way
at all

By; scoundrel


worry
since
Reports; painful

It was to us great woe; (t-note)
death to life; (see note)
(see note)
mute; deaf; healed; suffering

by deed

judge; death
relent; nothing at all

transgressed

speech (words)
ordain far better a decree

Yes, devil
everlasting

will destroy

(t-note)
struck at once
night time
If each one stands by our undertaking

scoundrels
secretly murder
given his advice




rule of holy church; (see note)
judge him alive or dead

acted against
Therefore
command
fair sir

waning moon; (see note)
Think; forever
sluggish scoundrel
unless



(see note)



 

Go To 18. The Buffeting