26. The Ascension

PLAY 26, THE ASCENSION: FOOTNOTES


1 The ascension of the Lord, etc.

2 Here he withdraws

3 Who bore witness of my resurrection

4 Here he withdraws from them

5 Then he goes to the ascending device (see note)

6 And so he ascends with the angels singing “I ascend to my Father” (see note)

7 Lines 400–01: My flesh quakes like a leaf on the linden tree / to avoid the torments, [which are] sharper than thorns

8 And bade me to seek always to please you

9 And heartily in haste we should salute that gracious one

10 There was never a maiden so honorable here on earth

11 Lines 434–35: But respond to our questioning, or else we might rave / Unless you clearly guide us, so gladly would we understand

12 Preach thus to the people who are of the greatest worth


PLAY 26, THE ASCENSION: EXPLANATORY NOTES

ABBREVIATIONS: ChesterThe Chester Mystery Cycle, ed. Lumiansky and Mills (1974); CTThe Canterbury Tales, ed. Benson (1987); DSLDictionary of the Scots LanguageElliottThe Apocryphal New Testament, ed. Elliott; EPThe Towneley plays, ed. England and Pollard (1897); MEDMiddle English DictionaryMSHuntington MS HM 1 (“the Towneley manuscript”); N-TownThe N-Town Plays, ed. Sugano (2007); OEDOxford English DictionaryREEDRecords of Early English DramaSCThe Towneley Plays, eds. Stevens and Cawley (1994); s.d.: stage direction; Whiting: Whiting, Proverbs, Sentences, and Proverbial PhrasesYorkThe York Corpus Christi Plays, ed. Davidson (2011).

The primary biblical source for the ascension of Jesus into heaven, forty days after the resurrection (see lines 16–17), is Acts 1:1–14, although the event is also mentioned in Mark 16:19 and Luke 24:50–52. In the latter passage, Jesus is said to lead his disciples to where the Ascension takes place, as he does in both the Chester and N-Town versions of the episode; like its York counterpart, the Towneley Ascension play requires no such change of scene, but does apparently require machinery to lift Jesus into heaven on a cloud — a moment that was evidently spectacular (see note below to 281, s.d.). Before that, much as in the Thomas play (and likewise contrary to the biblical account), Jesus twice suddenly appears and disappears before the disciples (here including Mary, based on her presence in Acts 1:14 immediately following the ascension). While the play lacks an ending, due to the missing leaves that also contained the beginning of the Judgment play (see the Introduction, p. 9, for further discussion), the action seems substantially complete. On the other hand, the “etc.” of the play’s title in the MS could possibly imply that the play went on to deal with an additional event, such as the choosing of an additional apostle to replace Judas Iscariot — an event likewise recounted in Acts 1 and briefly dramatized in the N-Town Ascension pageant — or even Pentecost (see note to line 15 below), recounted in Acts 2 and the subject of separate plays in N-Town, Chester, and York. The versification of the play is highly varied but without any discernible pattern or compositional layers, likely pointing to heavy editing and rewriting over time as well as to diverse source materials.


Before 1 Jude [character]. See note to line 437 below.

15 The Holy Gost, brethere, ment he. That is, he prophesied the coming of the Holy Spirit; see lines 33–35, where he (again) does so. (For “ment,” see MED menen (v.), sense 3d.) The descent of the Holy Spirit, commemorated as the feast of Pentecost (known as Whitsuntide in England, and the occasion of the biblical plays in Chester), occurred nine days after the ascension.

21 In Bethany here let us abyde. See Luke 24:50. Bethany — the home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus, and site of several events recounted in the gospels — was located east of Jerusalem, on the eastern slopes of Mount Olivet (the Mount of Olives) where the ascension was said to occur; see Acts 1:12 and the note to line 45 below.

45 Abide me here right on this hill. They are ostensibly already on Mount Olivet rather than in Bethany, proper.

120-36 My peasse . . . . is endid fully. See John 14:27–29.

137-73 Ye have bene . . . . in alkyn landys. This monologue is largely based on Mark 16:14–18 — one version of what is known as “the Great Commission” to spread the gospel (see also Matthew 28:16–20).

190-91 Farlee may we fownde and fare / For myssyng of oure master Jesus. In fear we may depart and go, because of the absence of our master, Jesus. The OED cites this line in defining farly as an adverb meaning “Far, to a great extent or distance.” However, the term is a form of ferli (see MED ferli (adj.) and ferlien (v.)), here meaning “fearful,” in reference to the sorrow and threats that Peter mentions in this speech (lines 193–95).

198 Mowrnyng makys us masid and mad. See York 41.98, in which Thomas states, “Mornyng makis me mased and madde.”

258-61 Bot John . . . . She is thi moder and thou hir childe. See 20:521–24 and John 19.26–27.

274-75 In his howse . . . for you now. See John 14:2.

281, s.d. Tunc vadit ad ascendendum. The ascension requires stage machinery (the ascendendum or “ascending thing” of the stage direction) involving the representation of a cloud (see lines 336, 389, and 425) in or on which Jesus rides up to heaven and out of sight, on the basis of Acts 1:9 (see SC p. 630n281+SD). A 1433 York Mercers’ Indenture listing stage properties pertaining to their production of the Doomsday pageant includes “a brandreth [grate] of Iren [th]at god sall sitte vppon when he sall sty vppe to heuen With iiij rapes at iiij corners” (that is, one rope at each corner of the grate) as well as “a cloud & ij peces of Rainbow of tymber” for him to sit on (REED: York, p. 55, lines 34–35, 27–28).

289, s.d. Ascendo ad patrem meum. These are the first words of an ecclesiastical antiphon for the feast of the Ascension, sung here by two angels; it is sung by one angel in York (42.176, s.d.), and by Christ himself in Chester (20.104, s.d.), as he is greeted by four angels.

292-95 Hevyn behold and se . . . . Where he syttys in majesté. SC suggest that Jesus should go to “his place on the heaven scaffold at the right hand of God the Father” (p. 631n290–303). However, the text itself gives no evidence of a visible heaven but rather draws attention to the ascension itself — “How Jesus up can weynde” (line 293) — and to the cloud in which he ascends (see note above to 281, s.d.). Medieval visual representations of the ascension typically just show Jesus’ feet above the heads of the disciples, below a curtain-like cloud.

308-39 For it is thurgh his myght / That all thing may. That is, this is done through the might of him who can do all things.

336 A clowde has borne my chylde to blys. Mary repeats this line verbatim in her next speech (line 389) — along with an appeal first to Jesus not to leave her with his enemies, and then to John to help her (lines 338–43 and 396–403) — possibly indicating duplication due to incomplete editing of the original text.

354-55 Where is Jesus, oure master dere / That here with us spake right now. SC question Matthew’s apparent ignorance given his presence at the ascension along with the rest, and suggest a connection to the scribal error just prior to these lines (see Textual Note 26.354 and SC p. 631n354). However, Matthew’s question is in regard to where exactly Jesus has gone: if neither he nor the audience can see Jesus at this point (see note to lines 292–95 above), the question makes more sense, although it would arguably indicate a lesser degree of faith than Mary demonstrates (see line 390 and note below). While Bartholomew does not question the ascension itself, he does ponder how far Jesus has gone from them; see lines 366–74. On the other hand, as already noted (see note to line 336 above), the text may well suffer from incomplete editing, including lines that were to have been removed; these lines would be more suitable immediately following the ascension, after line 297 — the last line in a previous series of quatrains.

362-87 A more mervell men . . . . that is right. These two stanzas are written in the 13-line “bob and wheel” stanza.

367 And yit longere I trowe he will. That is, I believe that Jesus will go farther still away from us than he is now.

372 he stevynd up so sodanly. See also line 379. The emphasis on the suddenness of the ascension likely indicates swift action, in contrast to the lengthy scene in Chester 20, which has Jesus sing as he rises, and converse with four angels.

379-80 So sodanly he was uphent / In flesh and fell fro erthe up here. That is, he was so suddenly taken up bodily from earth above here.

390 Now bot that I wote wheder is he. That is, if I did not know where he was. See note to lines 354–55 above.

393 It is the fourt of all my joyes. The “Joys of the Virgin Mary” are variously enumerated, there being as many as fifteen; however, the ascension of Jesus is frequently counted the fourth of five, the others being the Annunciation, the Nativity, the Resurrection, and the Assumption (of Mary into heaven) yet to come.

394 light on thi body. That is, may your body shine with radiance.

413 More comforth bot my son can I none crave. That is, I could ask no greater comfort than your (John’s) presence, except the presence of my son.

414-15 So covers thou my care and carpys unto me, / Whils I thee se, ever am I safe. That is, you speak to me so caringly that, as long as I see you, I feel completely safe.

427 semely in shrowde. Mary often wears a nun’s habit in medieval visual representations.

437 Jude. This character has no speaking role, and his absence would not be missed in performance, as few characters are clearly identified in the dialogue. Famously considered the patron saint of lost causes, this disciple is known both as Jude (or Judas, not to be confused with Judas Iscariot) and as Thaddeus (“Thadee” in the Towneley Conspiracy play; see 17.392), given the discrepancy between the names as given in Matthew 10:2–4 and Mark 3:14–19 as opposed to Luke 6:13–16 and Acts 1:13.

446-47 Sekys to thare savyng, ye apostilles aleven, / To the Jues of Jerusalem as youre way lyse. That is, seek the salvation of those who are most worthy (line 445), you eleven apostles, as you make your way to the Jews of Jerusalem.


PLAY 26, THE ASCENSION: TEXTUAL NOTES


The edition by Stevens and Cawley for the Early English Text Society, along with the facsimile edition that they likewise co-edited, remains the chief source for analysis of the Towneley manuscript and its various textual annotations, corrections, marginalia, and other particularities. Unlike theirs, the current edition makes no note of most minor corrections, such as an obviously misplaced and crossed-out letter before a correctly written word, except where these might potentially affect understanding of the established text.

Abbreviations: EP: The Towneley Plays, ed. England and Pollard (EETS, 1897); Facs: The Towneley Cycle: A Facsimile of Huntington MS HM 1, ed. Cawley and Stevens; MED: Middle English Dictionary; MS: Huntington MS HM 1 (base text); SC: The Towneley Plays, ed. Stevens and Cawley (EETS, 1994); s.d.: stage direction; Surtees: The Towneley Mysteries, ed. Raine; York: The York Corpus Christi Plays, ed. Davidson (2011).

1-2 Brethere all that . . . may I noght. MS: the first two lines are written in a formal variant of the main Anglicana hand.

5 John (speech heading). MS: Iohannes Apostolus.

64 If we mowrne now in oure mynde. So MS; however, as SC note (p. 629n64), the word now may be erroneously repeated from the previous line.

113-39 Herkyns to me . . . . rysyng can prefe. MS: a long strip has been cut from the leaf at the margin, but no visible text has been affected.

152 Who baptym will abyde. MS: above this line in the top margin a later hand has written Be yt known.

162 Tokyns forsothe shall bene. MS: following this line a later hand has written Our name allso to, another word (possibly teach) being smeared and illegible. The same hand has written for I wyll below line 165.

175 Jerosolyme cité. MS: Jerosolyme, emended for rhyme.

190-97 Farlee may we . . . . mowrne we may. SC inadvertently print these two quatrains as one stanza.

212 At oure mette I wold we wore. MS: in the left margin beside this line a late hand has written Our.

289, s.d. Ascendo ad patrem meum. So EP, SC. MS: ancendo, likely an accidental carryover from angelis in the same stage direction.

354 Where is Jesus oure master dere. Before this line in MS, at the top of the page and crossed out in black, is written Certys lady thou says full wele : he will us, repeating lines 222–23, likewise assigned to Matthew.

358 We thynk it. MS: before this line the name Thomas — evidently repeating the speech heading — has been lightly erased and crossed out in red.

After 411 MS: the signature “S[i]” in the bottom right-hand corner (partly cropped in the margin) is written in red. The rest of this signature is missing, having been cut out of the MS at some point.

412 Glad am I John whils I have thee. MS: above this line in the top margin a later hand has scrawled what looks like P Haw along with some indecipherable letters.

421 prowde. The last three letters in the MS are disfigured, and very close to the binding, but still visible.

438 And. MS: And and.

451 Or els be thay dampned as men full of vyce. MS: this is the last line on a full page of writing, the verso of the first leaf of a gathering (signature S; see note After 411 above); the rest of this gathering is missing.


 
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26. The Ascension

from: The Towneley Plays  2017











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Thomas
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Bartholomew
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Mary, mother of Jesus

Ascencio domini etc.1

Brethere, all that now here bene,
Forgett my Lorde yit may I noght;
I wote not what it may mene
Bot more I weyn ther will be wroght.
My Lord Jesus will wyrk his will,
Pleatt we never agans his thoght;
For us he wyrkes, as it is skyll,
His handwarke that he has wroght.
Apon his wordes will I ryst
That he hisself saide us untill
Ay stedfastly on hym to tryst;
Mystrust we never for goode ne ill.

In heven and erthe his myght may be,
His wytt and his will also;
The Holy Gost, brethere, ment he;
Thus will he never fro us go.

Fourty dayes now drawes nere
Sen his resurreccyon complete;
Afore that will he appere,
Thus sodanly not lefe us yett.

In Bethany here let us abyde;
We knaw not yit what may befall.
Peraventur it may betyde
He shall full well comforth us all.

Peasse, now, my dere freyndys.
Peasse be with you ever and ay,
For it all wrangys amendys.
Peasse, brethere sam, I say.

Brethere, in hartes be nothyng hevy
What tyme that I from you am gone;
I must go from you sone in hy,
Bot nevertheles make ye no mone
For I shall send to you anone
The Holy Gost to comforth you,
You to wysh in every wone.
I shall you tell what wyse and how
It shal be for youre prow
That I thus-gatys shall do;
It has bene saide or now
My Fader must I to.

With hym must I abide and dwell,
For so it is his will;
For youre comforth thus I you tell,
Be ye stedfast for good or ill.
Abide me here right on this hill
To that I com to you agane;
This forwarde must I nedys fulfill,
I will no longer fro you lane.
And therfor loke that ye be bayn
And also trew and stedfast
For whosoever you oght frayn
When that I am past.

Hic recedit.2

Full hevy in hart now may we be
That we oure master sall forgo,
Bot nevertheles yit saide he
He wold not dwell full lang us fro.
What wonder is if we be wo
Thus sodanly shall oure master mys,
And masters on lyfe have we no mo
That in this warld shuld us wys.
He will pas furth to blys
And leyfe us here behynde;
No mervell now it is
If we mowrne now in oure mynde.

In oure mynde mowrne we may
As men that masyd ar and mad,
And yit also, it is no nay,
We may be blythe and glad
Because of tythyngys that we had
That hisself can us say.
He bad be blythe and noght adrad
For he wold not be long away,
Bot yit both nyght and day
Oure hartes may be full sore,
As me thynk, by my fay,
For wordes he saide lang ore.

Lang ore he saide full openly
That he must nedys fro us twyn
And to his fader go in hy
To joy of heven that never shall blyn.
Therfor we mowrne, both more and myn,
And mery also yit may we be.
He bad us all both outt and in
Be glad and blythe in ich degré,
And saide that com shuld he
To comforth us kyndly.
Bot yit hevy ar we
To we hym se truly.

With ee wold we hym se,
Oure saveoure Crist, Goddys Son,
That dyed apon a tre,
Yit trewe I that we mon.
Now God grauntt us that boyn,
That with his bloode us boght,
To se hym in his throne,
As he maide all of noght.
His will now has he wroght
And gone from us away
As he noght of us roght,
And therfor mowrne we may.

We may mowrne, no mervell why,
For we oure master thus shall mys
That shall go fro us sodanly,
And we ne wote what cause is.
Nevertheles, the sothe is this:
He saide that he shuld com agane
To bryng us all to blys.
Therof may we be fane;
That commyng will us mych gane
And oure saules all save,
And put us fro that payn
That we were lyke to have.

Herkyns to me now, everichon,
And here what I will say,
For I must nedys fro you gone,
For thus my Fader will allway;
And therfor, peasse be with you ay
Whereso ye dwell in wone,
And to save you fro all fray,
My peasse be with you, blood and bone.
I lefe it you bi oon and oone,
Noght as the warld here dos;
It shal be true as any stone
To defende you fro youre foos.

Let not youre hartes be hevy;
Drede not for any kyns thyng.
Ye have harde me say full playnly
I go and to you am I commyng.
If ye luf me forthi,
Ye shuld be glad of this doyng,
For I go full securly
To my Fader, hevyns kyng,
The which without lesyng
Is mekill more then I.
Therfor be ye thus trowyng
When all is endid fully.

Ye have bene of mysbilefe,
Hard of harte and also of will;
To theym that my rysyng can prefe
No credence wold ye gif theym till.
Mary Mawdlayn saide you till
That I was rysyn, bot ye ne wold
Hir trow for good or ill
The trouth all if she told.
Sich harmes in hartes ye hold
And unstedfast ye ar,
Ye trowid no man of mold
Witnes of my rysyng that bare.3

Therfor ye shall go tech
In all this warld so wyde,
And to all the people preche;
Who baptym will abyde
And trowe truly
Mi dethe and rysyng,
And also myn upstevynyng,
And also myn agane commyng,
Thay shal be save suerly.

And who trowys not this
That now rehersyd is,
He shal be dampned, iwys,
For veniance and for wreke.
Tokyns forsothe shall bene
Of those that trow withoutten weyn:
Devyls shall thay kest out cleyn
And with new tongys speke;

Serpentes shall thay put away,
And venymus drynk bi nyght and day
Shall not noy theym, as I say;
And where thay lay on handys
Of seke men far and nere,
Thay shal be hole withoutten dere
Of all sekenes and sorowes sere,
Ever in alkyn landys.

And therfor now I byd that ye
Go not from Jerosolyme cité,
Bot abide the behest of my Fader fre
In land aywhore,
That ye have hard here of me.
For John Baptist, dere in degré,
In water forsoth baptysid me
Now herebefore.

And ye certan in every coste
Shall baptise in the Holy Goost,
Thrug vertue of hym that is the moost,
Lord God of myght,
Within few dayes now folowyng;
And herof mervell ye nothyng,
For this shal be his awne wyrkyng
Shewyd in youre sight.

Et recedit ab eis.4

Farlee may we fownde and fare
For myssyng of oure master Jesus.
Oure hartys may sygh and be full sare;
Thise Jues with wreke thay waten us.

Us to tray and teyn
Ar thay abowte bi nyght and day.
For Jesu that is so seldom sene
As masid men mowrne we may.

Mowrnyng makys us masid and mad
As men that lyff in drede;
Full comforthles ar we stad
For myssyng of hym that us shuld lede.

Thise Jues that folow thare faythles will
And demed oure master to be ded,
With mayn and mode they wold hym spill
If thay wist how, in towne or sted.

Let kepe us fro thare carpyng kene
And com bot lytyll in thare sight.
Oure master will com when we leest weyn;
He will us rewle and red full right.

Of this carpyng now no more.
It drawes nygh the tyme of day;
At oure mette I wold we wore.
He sende us socowre that best may.

Socowre sone he will you sende
If ye truly in hym will traw;
Youre mone mekely will he amende,
My brethere dere, this may ye knawe.

The hestys hyghly that he me hight
He has fulfillid in worde and dede.
He gabbyd never, bi day nor nyght;
Forthi dere brethere have no drede.

Certys, lady, thou says full wele
He will us amende, for so he may;
We have fon sothe everilka dele
All that ever we hard hym say.

Peter and ye, my derlyngys dere,
As masid men me thynk ye ar;
Holly to you I have shewyd here
To bryng youre hartys from care.

In care youre hartys ar cast
And in youre trowth not trew;
In hardnes youre hartys ar fast
As men that no wytt knew.

Sende was I for youre sake
Fro my Fader dere
Flesh and blode to take
Of a madyn so clere.

Sythen to me ye soght
And holly felowid me,
Of wonders that I have wroght
Som have I letten you se.

The dombe, the blynde as any stone
I helyd ther I cam by;
The dede I rasid anone
Thrugh my myght, truly.

And othere warkys that wonderfull wor
I wroght wisely befor you all:
My payn, my passion, I told before
Holly thrugoutt as it shuld fall:

Mi rysyng on the thryd day,
As ye bi tokyns many oone have sene.
Youre trouth truly had bene away,
Had not my blissid moder bene.

In hir it restyd all this tyde;
Youre dedys ye ow greatly to shame.
Here may ye se my woundys wyde,
How that I boght you out of blame.

Bot John, thynk when I hang on rud
That I betoke thee Mary mylde:
Kepe hir yit with stabull mode;
She is thi moder and thou hir childe.

Loke thou hir luf and be hir freynde,
And abide with hir in well and wo,
For to my Fader now will I weynde;
Thar none of you aske wheder I go.

Lord, if it be thi will,
Shew us thi Fader, we thee pray.
We have bene with thee in good and ill
And sagh hym never, nyght ne day.

Philipp, that man that may se me
He seys my Fader, full of myght.
Trowys thou not he dwellys in me
And I in hym, if thou trow right?

In his howse ar dyverse place
I go to ordan for you now.
Ye shall all be fulfillyd with grace;
The Holy Goost I shall sende you.

He shall you in youre hartys wyse
In worde and dede, as I you say;
With all my hart I you blys.
My moder, my brethere, have all good day.

Tunc vadit ad ascendendum.5

Fader of heven, with good intent
I pray thee, here me specyally:
From heven till erth thou me sent
Thi name to preche and claryfy.

Thi will have I done, all and som;
In erthe will I no longere be.
Opyn the clowdes, for now I com
In joy and blys to dwell with thee.

Et sic ascendit, cantantibus angelis “Ascendo ad patrem meum.”6

Ye men of Galylee,
Wherfor mervell ye?
Hevyn behold, and se
How Jesus up can weynde
Unto his Fader fre,
Where he syttys in majesté
With hym ay for to be
In blys withoutten ende.

And as ye sagh hym sty
Into heven on hy,
In flesh and fell in his body
From erthe now here,
Right so shall he securly
Com downe agane, truly,
With his woundys blody,
To deme you all in fere.

Mervell have no wight,
No wonder of this sight,
For it is thrugh his myght
That all thyng may,
Whatso he will by day or nyght,
In hell, medyll erth, and on hight,
Or yit in derknes or in light,
Withoutten any nay.

For he is God all-weldand,
Heven and hell, both se and sand,
Wod and water, fowll, fysh, and land —
All is at his will.
He haldys all thyng in his hand
That in this warld is lyfand;
Then nedys ye noght be mervelland,
And for this skyll.

Ryght as he from you dyd weynde,
So com agane he shall
In the same manere at last ende,
To deme both greatt and small.
Whoso his byddyng will obey
And thare mys amende
With hym shall have blys on hy,
And won ther withoutten ende.

And who that wyrk amys
And theym amende will never
Shall never com in heven blys,
Bot to hell banyshed forever.
A selcouth sight yonder now is.
Behold now, I you pray:
A clowde has borne my chylde to blys;
Mi blyssyng bere he ever and ay.

Bot son, thynk on thi moder dere
That thou has laft emangys thi foes.
Swete son, lett me not dwell here;
Let me go with thee where thou goes.

Bot John, on thee is all my trast;
I pray thee, forsake me noght.
Lefe Marye, be noght abast,
For thi will shall ay be wroght.

Here may we se and full well knaw
That he is God most of myght;
In hym is good we trawe,
Holly to serve hym day and nyght.

A mervellous sight is yone
That he thus sone is taken us fro;
Fro his fomen is he gone,
Withoutten help of othere mo.

Where is Jesus, oure master dere
That here with us spake right now?
A wonderfull sight men may se here.
My brethere dere, how thynk you?

We thynk it wonder all
That oure master shuld thus go;
After his help I red we call,
That we may have som tokyn hym fro.

A more mervell men never saw
Then now is sene us here emang:
From erthe till heven a man be draw
With myrth of angell sang.
From us, me thynk, he is full long,
And yit longere I trow he will.
Alas, my hart it is so strong
That I ne may now wepe my fill
Anone.
A wonder sight it was to se
When he stevynd up so sodanly
To his Fader in majesté
By hisself alone.

Alon, forsothe, up he wentt
Into heven till his Fader
And no man wyst what he ment
Nor how he dyd of no manere,
So sodanly he was uphent
In flesh and fell fro erthe up here.
He saide his Fader for hym sent
That maide us all to be in dwere
This nyght.
Nevertheles full well wote we
As that he will so must it be,
For all thyng is in his pausté,
And that is right.

Allmyghty God, how may this be?
A clowde has borne my childe to blys.
Now bot that I wote wheder is he
My hart wold breke, well wote I this.
His stevynyng up to blys in hy
It is the fourt of all my joyes.
Mi blyssyng barne, light on thi body.
Let never thi moder be spylt with Jues.

Take me to thee, my son so heynd,
And let me never with Jues be lorne.
Help, for my son luf, John, son kynde,
For ferde that I with Jues be torne.
Mi flesh it qwakys as lefe on lynde
To shontt the showres sharper then thorne.7
Help me, John, if thou be kynde;
My son myssyng makys me to mowrne.

Youre servande, lady, he me maide,
And bad me kepe you ay to qweme;8
Blythe were I, lady, myght I thee glad,
And with my myght I shall thee yeme.

Therfor be ferd for no kyn thyng
For oght that Jues wold do you to;
I shall be bayn at youre byddyng
As my Lorde bad youre servande, lo.

Glad am I, John, whils I have thee;
More comforth bot my son can I none crave.
So covers thou my care and carpys unto me,
Whils I thee se, ever am I safe.

Was none safe my son more trusty to me;
Therfor his grace sall never fro thee go.
He shall thee qwyte that died on a tre;
Well mendys thou my mode when I am in wo.

Let hy us fro this hill and to the towne weynde,
For fere of the Jues that spitus ar and prowde.
With oure dere lady I red that we weynd
And pray till hir dere son hereapon lowde.
To hir buxumly I red that we bende,
Syn hir dere son fro us is gone in a clowde,
And hertely in hast haylse we that heynde;9
To oure master is she moder, semely in shrowde.

A, Marie so mylde, thee myssid we have.
Was never madyn so menskfull here apon molde10
As thou art, and moder cleyne, bot this wold we crave:
If this were Jesu thi son that Judas has sold,
Shew us the sothe, us all may it save.
We pray thee, dere lady, layn that thou nold
Bot spell us oure spyryng, or els mon we rafe
Bot thou witterly us wysh, so fayn wyt we wold.11

Peter, Andrew, John, and Jamys the gent,
Symon, Jude, and Bartilmew the bold,
And all my brethere dere that ar on this bent,
Take tent to my tayll till that I have told
Of my dere son what I have mentt,
That hens is hevyd to his awne hold.
He taght you the trouthe or he to heven went
He was borne of my bosom as hisself wold.

He is God and man that stevynd into heven;
Preche thus to the pepyll that most ar in price.12
Sekys to thare savyng, ye apostilles aleven,
To the Jues of Jerusalem as youre way lyse;
Say to the cyté as I can here neven,
Tell the warkys of my son warly and wyse.
Byd theym be stedfast and lysten youre steven
Or els be thay dampned as men full of vyce.

[…]
 












(see note)




Brothers; been; (t-note)
yet; not
know; mean
think; done
work; 
(t-note)
Plead; against
works; reason
handiwork; made
rest
unto us
trust
nor



brothers; prophesied; (see note)
from


Since
Before
leave


happen; (see note)
Perhaps; occur
comfort



wrongs amends
together

hearts; sorrowful

soon in haste
lament
at once

guide; place
in what way
profit
thus
before
[go] to

remain

comfort

Wait for; (see note)
Until
promise
from; lean
look; ready
true
might ask anything of you





go without

long from us

miss
alive
guide

leave
marvel
mourn; 
(t-note)


are confused
without doubt
joyful
tidings

bade [us to]; afraid
would


by my faith
long before


needs; part
in haste
cease
mourn all
merry

joyous; every way


sorrowful
Until

eye; [fol. 118r]
savior
upon
trust; shall
favor





As if he cared nothing for us
mourn

marvel
miss
suddenly

truth
again

glad
gain




Listen; everyone; 
(t-note)

needs; go

always
in the world
fear
(see note)
leave; one after another
world

foes


any manner of thing
heard; clearly

love; therefore
event
certainly

lying
much
believing


disbelief; (see note)

prove

to you
but; would not
Believe her

Such

believed; on earth


teach


Whoever will agree to be baptized; 
(t-note)
believe

ascension
again
saved surely


told
certainly
vengeance; punishment
Tokens; 
(t-note)
without a doubt
Devils; cast out clean
tongues


poisonous
trouble

sick
whole; harm
various
every land


(t-note)
promise
anywhere
heard here
honorable



countryside

Through


marvel
working
Shown



In fear; depart; go; (see note)
(t-note)

sigh; sore
These vengeful Jews lie in wait for us

grieve; harm


confused

Mourning; confused; (see note) [fol. 119r]
live in fear
placed
lead

These; their faithless
sentenced; to death
Fervently; wish to kill him
knew; place

their sharp chatter
but little; their
least expect
rule and counsel

chatter
near
food; were; 
(t-note)
succor


believe
lament; meekly
know

noble promises; promised

deceived
Therefore

well

found [to be] entirely true
heard

darlings
confused
Wholly; shown [myself]



not true in your belief






maiden so pure


wholly followed



dumb (mute)
healed where
raised at once


works; were
did

throughout


by tokens; seen

Had it not been for my blessed mother

her; time
owe
wounds wide


hung on the cross; (see note)

Keep; stable disposition
your mother

See to it [that] you love her
happiness and sorrow

None of you need ask where I go


Show

saw


sees
Believe


places; (see note)
prepare



hearts guide

bless


(see note)


hear
unto earth
preach; declare

some
On
Open the clouds


(see note)
(t-note)

Galilee
marvel
(see note)
go

majesty
always


saw; ascend
high
skin

certainly


judge you all together

creature

(see note)


middle earth; on high
darkness
any doubt

almighty
sea
Wood (forest)

holds everything
world is living

reason

did go; [fol. 120v]

manner
judge
bidding
their misdeeds amend
bliss on high
dwell there forever

whoever does amiss
reform themselves


wonderful

cloud; (see note)
ever and always

mother dear
left among
Sweet


trust
not
Dear; afraid




It is good [that] we believe in him
Wholly

there
soon; from
enemies
any others

(see note)
(t-note); [fol. 121r]




(t-note)


some token from him


seen; 
(see note)
drawn
joy; song
very far
farther; 
(see note)


At once

ascended; suddenly; 
(see note)

himself

Alone

knows; thought
Nor how he did in any manner
raised up; 
(see note)
flesh and skin from

in awe



power



cloud

(see note)
heart; break
ascension; in haste
fourth; (see note)
child; 
(see note)
killed by Jews

gracious
lost
son’s love
fear



missing; mourn

made

Glad
protect

afraid of no manner of thing

ready; bidding
(t-note)

(t-note);[fol. 121v]
(see note)
cares for me; 
(see note)
While I see you

except
shall; from
reward
disposition

hasten; go
fear; spiteful; 
(t-note)
advise
unto; concerning this aloud
obediently; submit
Since

mourning garb; 
(see note)

missed

pure; would

Show; truth
that you should not be silent
questioning


gentle
(see note)
on this field; (t-note)
Pay attention to my tale
meant
hence is risen; his own realm
before
he himself commanded

ascended

eleven; 
(see note)

mention
works; warily and wise
voice
damned; vice; 
(t-note)


 
 


Go To 27. Judgment