Arthur at Tamelide

ARTHUR AT TAMELIDE: FOOTNOTES

3 her, their.

4 whereas, where; sojourned upon, abided until; Pasche Even, Easter Eve.

6 leven, depart from.

7 paleise, palace; fonde, found.

9 discounfited, defeated.

11 abaisshed, upset.

12 puyssaunce, force.

13 kowde, knew; agein, against.

14 areyse hem, free themselves.

16 belefte, remaining.

22 at pryme barbe, in early manhood; yede, went; somdell, somewhat more.

25 yede hem ageins, approached them.

26 hym semed, he thought.

27 salued, greeted.

29 noon evell ne, no evil purpose.

31 into, until; wyte, know; volunté, own volition; but, if.

32 disese, suffering.

33 inowe, enough; in soche forme, on such terms.

34 withholde, support; sowdioures, soldiers.

35 sey, tell; pleysier, desires.

37 besekynge, urged.

37-38 be at his leiser, do his bidding.

38 cleped, called.

39 how hem semed, what they thought; demaunded, asked.

40 her counseile, their advice; withholde hem, retain them.

41 worthynesse, worthiness.

46 will, wish; noon, anyone; what ye be, who you are; ne, nor.

48 semblaunce, appearance; withsey, deny; that, what.

49 withholde, retain.

51 thus moche, this much.

52 godely mayen, are able; wite, know.

54 paraventure, perhaps.

56 take in gré, accept; graunted for, agreed.

57 suerté, pledge.

60 loiggynge, lodging; vavasour, lesser nobleman.

61 herberowe, lodging.

62 esy, pleasant.

65 lepe, rushed; hem agenis, to them.

66 lighten, alighted; yede, went.

67 yomen dight, yeomen put.

70 wurshiped, honored.

71 holde, think.

71-72 travayle nothinge loste, efforts were wasted.

72 somowned, summoned.

73 tho, those.

75 wite, know; streyte, strict.

76 longed to thevis, deserved thieves.

77 sowdiours, soldiers.

80 what on, counting those; withoute hem, excluding those.

84 entreynge, beginning.

87 vitaile, food.

89 abode, awaited.

90 pray, livestock.

92 at sojourne, at their ease.

97 sonne, the sun.

98 medled amonge noon, mixed with any.

99 arayed hem, prepared themselves.

102 was wonte to bere, used to carry.

103 he, i.e., Cleodalis.

104 ganfanon, standard; losenges of goules, diamond-shapes in red; feelde, field (background).

105 ynde, blue.

106 renged hem, stationed themselves; portes, gates.

107 abode, awaited.

108 bounté, excellence.

109 hoved stille, waited quietly.

113 dere, dearly; sue, follow.

114 what, whatever; yede, went.

117 soche oon, such a one.

118 right grete, very large; fadome, fathom (6 feet).

119 tortue, entwined; braulinge, fluttering.

120 heire of, air from.

121 With that, Then.

123 prayes of bestes, group of animals.

124 eschuwed, avoided.

127 makeste thow daunger of, i.e., do you doubt.

128 flayle, bar.

130 magré, despite; grucchid, complained.

131-32 as close as, as closed as if.

132 blissid, crossed themselves.

133 priked, rode.

135 frusht, rushed.

138 pray, group of animals.

140 so grete cariage, a large baggage train; piled, pillaged.

142 Suweth, Follow; fill so, happened; anoon as, as soon as.

143 charme, spell.

144 visages, faces.

148 issed, issued.

153 into, inside.

156 medelinge, fighting.

157 departed, divided.

158 agein, against.

159 ton, one; tother, other.

159-60 neighed nygh, drew near.

161 dismailed, pierced mail.

167 at gret myschief, in great trouble; behoved, were forced; disparble, retreat.

168 wolde or noon, wished to or not; voyde, leave.

169 streite, tight.

170 litill, few.

172 dispyte, anger; ensigne, battle-cry.

173 shoure, rush; shofte, push.

174 diffoule, injure.

175 maymen, maim; felowes, i.e., opponents; arrestynge, i.e., fighting back.

177 lothly, badly.

180 wende, thought; alle here werre, all their fighting.

183 sowowned, swooned.

194 nygh, nearly.

195 slowe, slew; doell, grief.

198 stour, fighting; theras, where.

201 grennynge, grinning.

202 walop, gallop.

203 sue, follow.

205 pas, pace; theras, where.

210 drive, drove; slough, slew.

211 raught, struck.

213 martirdom, death.

214 rought, cared.

217 martire, slaughter; occision, killing.

218 beheilde, looked.

219 sowdiours, soldiers.

220 withholden, retained; socoure, aid.

221 rested, stopped.

223 right, readied; sethen, then.

225 what, why; Suweth, Follow.

226 raundon, pace.

227 at gret myschief, in great danger.

231 that, so that; clernesse, brightnesse.

232 longe, away.

235 spronge, jumped.

235-36 merveiled what, wondered who.

241 yaf, gave.

242 whom, whomever; arafte, struck; waranted, protected.

244 sithes, times.

248 what, who; araught, struck.

249 theras, where.

254 moste, largest.

255 moche, large.

257 eere, ear; lifte, left.

258 girdell, belt.

259 ganfanouer, standard-bearer; of, off; with all, along with.

261 conne, can.

265 theras, where.

268 renged, arranged.

269 in poynte, about.

271 ferde, moved.

273 leten, leave.

274 marteleise, hammering.

276 stour, fighting; fell, cruel.

278 renne maisterles, run riderless.

280 bruyt, sounds.

281 doel, grief; here, hear.

283 traces, remains; sued, followed.

284 nought ne, neither; ne, nor.

285 tho, those.

305 leve, leave.

308 for noon unkyndenesse, i.e., for despite whatever unkindness.

309 ne leve, nor leave; myscheif, troubles.

312 troweth, truth.

320 cowde, could.

321 faile, doubt; Till it fill, It happened.

322 agein, against.

325 Hit fill, It befell.

326 cleped, called.

327 bewté, beauty.

329 an usage, a habit.

330 servyse to messe, the services until mass.

331 yede, went.

333 sawter, psalter.

335 dide, put; brennynge, burning.

336 what, who.

338 deffended, resisted.

341 geten, begotten.

342 reynes, loins.

344 traveyle, be in labor.

345 oon cowde, one could.

346 reynes, loins; hight, was named; bapteme, baptism.

348 keled, cooled.

349 shet, shut.

350 heilde, held.

351 he1, i.e., the steward.

353 never feyned, i.e., was always glad.

354 ther, where.

355 all betyme, in time; twey, two.

355-56 mater fallith, story turns.

358 discounfiture, defeat; small, few.

360 discounfited, undone.

361 of2, by.

362 sowdioures, soldiers.

363 fonde, found.

365 hem ageins, to meet them.

367 hool, whole.

368 wynnynge, booty.

370 withholden, retained.

373 worschip, honor.

374 wolde, wished.

375 yeftes, gifts; seth, since.

376 departe, distribute; yeve, give.

379 hadden, received; tho, those.

380 nothynge, not at all.

381 largesse be, generosity by; nought, nothing.

383 ooste, host (i.e., Blaires).

385 departed, distributed.

387 alight, stay.

390 bare, carry.

404 the sowdiours, i.e., Arthur's forty knights.

406 affiered, belonged.

409 hym, i.e., Arthur.

410 what1, who.

411 And, If.

412 spoused, wedded.

413 but yef, unless; other elles, or else.

415 nought, not.

418 fill in his mynde, came to mind.

420 prowesses, deeds.

421 war, aware.

422 yede, went; wroth, angry.

423 heede, head.

424 saugh, saw; abaisshed, reserved.

425 thenke, appear; that, though.

430-31 cesseth till eftesones, cease until later on.

434 yede, went; tho, then.

437 debonerly, courteously.

438 nygh, near.

440 visage, face.

441 entermedled, mingled; nother, neither.

444 fetures, features; yef, if.

445 bounté, goodness.

448 pappes, breasts; appelis, apples.

450 pensif, melancholy.

451 chere, face; wolde not, did not want.

451-52 ne noon, nor any.

452 aperceyved, observed.

453 clepe, call.

454 abaisshed at, frightened by.

455 were beholden, sustained.

458 guerdon yelde, debt repay.

459 quyte, repaid.

463 sembelant, the appearance; greved, saddened.

465 aventure, danger.

466 fayn, glad.

469-70 ne wolde not, did not wish [her to].

471 clothes, table cloth.

474 werres, wars; wele woxen, well grown.

475 heyres, heirs.

476 here before, before now.

478 letted, prevented; werre, war.

480 seth, since.

481 yeve, give; yef, if.

484 desesse, death.

488 corage, heart.

494 cure, desire.

495 fayn he wolde, gladly he wished; aresoned, discussed.

496 pees, peace; herkened yef, watched if; aperceyve, learn.

497 what1, who.

498 hym, i.e., Arthur; mysese, discomfort.

501 abasshed, surprised; hym coveyted, he desired; hertely, truly.

502 fayn, gladly.

503 make, husband; tho, those.

509 seke, sick; ton, one; cleped, called.

510 vengeresse, vengeful.

511 cleped, called.

513 nece, niece.


Arthur at Tamelide

[Fols. 69r (line 31)-90r (line 11)]

The mission of "the Forty-two Soldiers" (Arthur, Merlin, and the Forty Companions) to assist King Leodegan in his war against King Rion is yet another section of the narrative that is largely unique to the PM. One of its central purposes is to introduce Arthur to his future wife Gonnore, the daughter of King Leodegan. Geoffrey of Monmouth, one of the first writers to mention Arthur's wife, offered little information about her except to saythat she was descended from a noble Roman family and was the most beautiful woman in Britain (Thorpe, p. 221); but the author of the PM tells us a great deal about Gonnore's parents and about the night when she and her notorious half-sister, known as the "False Gonnore," were begotten by Leodegan. Malory, on the other hand, reduces all of the material in this section to a mere ten lines, and one has the impression that he prefers to avoid the attractive and appealing descriptions provided by this author of Arthur and Gonnore falling in love. Malory simply says, "And there had Arthure the firste syght of queene Gwenyvere, the kyngis doughter of the londe of Camylarde, and ever afftir he loved hir" (Vinaver, p. 26).

21-22 alle yonge bacheleres at pryme barbe. Arthur and his companions (other than Ban, Bors, and Merlin) are all in the first stage of young adulthood; they are youthful knights proudly sporting their first beards (their pryme barbe).

30 not to knowe oure names. Knights choosing to conceal their identities until after they have proved themselves is a narrative device that occurs often in medieval romances. One of the most famous examples is in Malory's "Tale of Gareth."

73 at the Ascencion. Ascension Day, commemorating Christ's Ascension into heaven, is the fortieth day after Easter (see Acts 1:9).

81-82 in tho dayes fyve hundred was cleped a thousande. The writer may be uneasy about the extremely large numbers of warriors involved in these battles; this appears to be an attempt to preserve credibility.

104-06 a smal ganfanon . . . crownes of golde. Both the smaller standard that Cleodalis bears and the larger one that Hervy bears display typical medieval heraldic devices. The smaller banner has two red diamond-shapes ("losenges") displayed on a field of gold, along with two blue crowns; the description of the great banner is less specific, but it seems to have four diamond-shapes (also on a field of gold?) with gold crowns inside the losenges.

285 to reherse the names of tho worthi men. Long catalogs listing the names of knights are common in Arthurian literature. Chrétien, for example, provided catalogs in Erec of the best of Arthur's knights and of the people attending Erec's wedding. Perhaps the most famous catalog of knights is Malory's listing of the knights who attempt to heal Sir Urry (Vinaver pp. 665-67). There is no group of knights in Malory corresponding to the Forty-two Soldiers of the PM, but during the Battle of Bredigan Forest Malory does list twenty-one knights who performed well there, and most of them are included in this list of the Forty-two.

321-22 a Feste of Seint John. This would probably be the Feast of John the Baptist, celebrated on June 24, rather than December 27, the saint's day commemorating St. John the Divine (Christ's disciple).

326 that was cleped Gonnore. The name of Leodegan's daughter, the woman who will become Arthur's wife, occurs in a variety of forms in medieval literature. In the early Welsh legends she is called Gwenhwyvar; in Geoffrey of Monmouth she is Guanhumora; in Malory her name is Gwenyvere. But the form used in the PM, Gonnore, is one of the more common forms of her name in medieval Arthurian works.

329-30 to sey Matyns and to heere all servyse to messe. Leodegan's wife is a very devout woman whose custom is to attend all the religious services of the day, beginning with matins (the earliest service, often sung at 2 a.m.) and on until Mass when the Eucharist is celebrated.

337 and than he . . . bad hir be stille. Although medieval rulers often took great liberties with their subjects, Leodegan's behavior here is deplorable. And, as often happens in medieval and Renaissance stories, the child conceived in such a circumstance -- in this case "the False Gonnore" -- will turn out to be morally corrupt, as in the famous instances of Mordred and the bastard Edmund in Shakespeare's King Lear.upon the childes reynes a litill crosse like a crowne for a kynge. The true Gonnore possesses a tiny birthmark, the only physical difference between these virtually identical half-sisters; later on, of course, Gonnore's birthmark will provide the means by which the sisters are distinguished.

Summary Based on EETS 21, pp. 214-24.

453-54 be ye not abaisshed at youre sopere. Gonnore's remark is said in the spirit of light-hearted banter -- "you should not be frightened by your supper, a man like you who today showed no fear of the Saxons."

506-07 saf only Helayn that was withouten pere. Gonnore, the writer claims, surpasses all the women of Britain in beauty and virtue except for one -- Elaine, the daughter of King Pelles, the niece of the Fisher King and the Maimed King, and the mother of Sir Galahad.

508-09 the Kynge Pesceor and of the seke kynges wounded. King Pesceor is the Fisher King, and the "sick wounded king" is his brother Alain, also known as the Maimed King.

510 the spere vengeresse. This is the weapon by which Alain is wounded through both thighs; Malory calls the event in which this wounding takes place the striking of the "dolorouse stroke" (Vinaver, pp. 53-54).

Summary Based on EETS 21, pp. 229-57.
 
Print Copyright Info Purchase

Arthur at Tamelide

by: John Conlee (Editor)
from: Prose Merlin  1998

 
 
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Arthur at Tamelide
 
Right here seith the Frensch Booke that whan the Kynge Arthur was departed
fro Bredigan, he and the Kynge Ban of Benoyk and the Kynge Boors of Gannes
his brother, that thei rode so her journés till thei com to Tamelide and after to
Toraise, whereas the Kynge Leodogan sojourned upon the Pasche Even. And whan
thei entred into the citee, Merlin rode with hym upon a grete stede, as he that
wolde not hym leven in no manere.
Than thei com to the paleise and fonde the Kynge Leodogan gretly affraied,
for the Kynge Ryon was entred his londe upon hym with fifteen kynges crowned
and hadde hym discounfited and dryven oute of the feilde. And thei were loigged
at a seige before a citee cleped Nablaise, that was a grete town and a riche and
plenteuouse of alle goodes. Of this thynge was the Kynge Leodogan gretly abaisshed
and dismayed, for his enmyes hadde brought upon hym soche a grete puyssaunce
of peple, and he ne kowde no counseile how he myght his londe deffende agein
the Kynge Ryon, for he hadde not peple in his reame sufficient to areyse hem fro
the sege ne to chase hem oute of his reame; and so therof he counseilled with his
kynghtes that were with hym belefte and asked of hem counseile and her advys.
In the while that Kynge Leodogan toke thus his counseile of his knyghtes,
entred in the Kynge Arthur and his companye into the paleise and com before the
Kynge Leodogan, holdynge eche othir be the honde, two and two togeder. And the
storye seith that with Arthur were forty, and hymself and Merlin made forty-two;
and thei weren alle right wele clothed and richely arrayed, and alle yongebacheleres
at pryme barbe, excepte the two kynges that yede before that somdell were in age,
and thei were feire knyghtes and semely. And thei were beholden of grete and
smale of alle that were therinne, for thei were of freissh aray and riche atire. And
whan thei com before the Kynge Leodogan, anoon he aroos and yede hem ageins,
for hym semed thei weren high men and of grete astate.
Than spake the Kynge Ban first and salued the Kynge Leodogan as soone as he
myght; and the kynge seide thei were welcome yef thei come for goode. "Certes,
sir," seide he, "for noon evell ne be we not entred into youre reame, but we be
come to serve yow with this condicion -- that ye desire not to knowe oure names
into the tyme that we lete yow wyte of oure volunté. And but it plese yow in this
maner, we commaunde yow to God that He yow deffende from all evell and disese,
for we shulde fynde inowe that us will resceyve in soche forme as we yow
demaunde; but we have herde sey that ye withholde alle the sowdioures that to
yow will come. Now sey us youre pleysier."
Than ansuerde the Kynge Leodogan that he wolde avise hym by his counseile
and besekynge hem therwith not to be displesed; and thei ansuerde agein to be at
his leiser. Than cleped the Kynge Leodogan the Knyghtes of the Rounde Table
and asked how hem semed of that the knyghtes hym demaunded, and what was
her counseile. And thei ansuerde that to withholde hem myght he have no dam-
age, for thei semede to be of grete worthynesse; "And resceyve hem in Goddes
name, and pray hem as soone as thei may to sey what thei be and to make hem to
be knowen."
Than departed the kynge fro the counseile and com into the halle where the
barouns hym abiden. And than he seide to hem, "Feire lordynges, me merveileth
gretly of that ye have me requered, that ye will not that noon knowe what ye be ne
what be youre names, and of soche thynge herde I never speke. But by youre
semblaunce ye seme alle worthi men, and therfore I will in no wise withsey that
ye requere; and be ye right welcome, and I yow withholde as my lordes and
felowes in soche forme that ye shull me ensure to helpe me feithfully and trewly
while that ye be in my companye. But thus moche I will yow hertely prayen, that
as soone as ye godely mayen, ye will lete me wite what ye be. And I shall telle yow
wherfore, for ye may be soche that I sholde have shame that I have yow not
served as ye ought for to be, for paraventure ye be of higher astate than am I."
And thei ansuerde that he ne sholde to hem do nothynge but thei wolde it gladly
take in gré. And the Kynge Ban hym graunted for to telle her names as soone as
tyme requered; and than thei made theire suerté to the Kynge Leodogan hym trewely
for to serve.
Than thei departed from the kynge and wente into the town for to take the beste
loiggynge that thei myght knowe. And Merlin hem ledde to the house of a vavasour
that was right a gode man and a yonge bacheler; and the herberowe was right
godely and esy, and the wif was right a noble woman and a feire and goode to God
and to the worlde. The lorde of the house was a worthy man and of gode livynge,
and his name was Blaires and his wif Leonell. And whan thei com before the place,
Blaires lepe oute hem agenis and seide thei were welcome, and thei hym thankeden.
Anon thei lighten and yede up into the halle that was right feire and wel beseyn,
and the yomen dight her horses well at ese.
Thus thei sojourned in the town eight dayes full, and nothinge dide but ete and
dranke and made hem mery and wente to the courte even and morowe whan thei
wolden. And the Kynge Leodogan hem served and wurshiped in all that he myght,
and yet he will more whan he knoweth what thei be; he will not holde his travayle
nothinge loste. And moreover, the Kynge Leodogan somowned his peple thourghoute
his reame, alle tho that armes myght bere, that at the Ascencion thei sholde be at
Toraise, redy armed hemself to deffende in bataile agein theire enmyes.And alle
tho that ne wolde not com, he lete hem well wite that thei sholde have as streyte
justice as longed to thevis and traytoures. And also the Kynge Leodogan sente
after hys frendes and sowdiours over all where he myght hem gete for golde or
silver, and ther com so grete plenté of oon and other that thei were assembled on
the Ascencion Even in the medowes undir Toraise and loigged in teyntes and
pavilouns, forty thousand what on horse bakke and on fote, withoute hem that
were in the town, whereof ther were six thousand; but the story seith that in tho
dayes fyve hundred was cleped a thousande.
In the tyme that Kynge Leodogan hadde somowned so his peple, it befill on a
Tewisday at even, in the entreynge of May, that the Kynge Ryolent and the Kynge
Phariouns of Irelonde and the Kynge Senygres and the Kynge Serans were de-
parted fro the hoste with fifteen thousande men of armes, and ran thourgh the
contrey for vitaile whereof thei hadde grete nede. And it befill that thei com
wastynge the contrey toward Torayse, where the Kynge Leodogan of Tamelide
sojourned and abode his peple that he hadde sente after.
Than herde the kynge the noyse of hem that gadered togeder the pray and robbed
the londe and the contrey aboute Torayse. And thei of the town hem perceyved,
and than thei closed the gates; and the knyghtes that were withynne at sojourne
ronne to theire armes and lepe to theire horse and assembled hem togeder with-
ynne the yates. Than were alle the Knyghtes of the Rounde Table armed, and the
governaunce of hem hadde Hervy the Rivell and Males ly Bruns; and thei were
two hundred and fifty that alle were noble gode knyghtes and trewe, and were so
worthi in armes that under sonne men myght fynde noon better. These were alle in
a wynge by hemself, for thei wolde not be medled amonge noon other. And on the
tother side the knyghtes and the peple of the citee arayed hem, and thei were four
thousand, and of these hadde the stiward the governaunce hem to lede that was
cleped Cleodalis.
This Cleodalis was wonte to bere the chief baner of the kynge, but ever after
that the Knyghtes of the Rounde Table were come, Hervy the Rivell it bar; but he
bar a smal ganfanon of two smale losenges of goules and the feelde of golde and
crownes of ynde; and the grete baner that Hervy bar was of four losenges full of
crownes of golde. Whan thei were well armed, thei renged hem before the portes
and abode the comaundement of the kynge. And whan the kynge was armed, he
lepe on a grete stede of greet bounté and rode to the baner that Hervy bar. And
ther he hoved stille till thei saugh come the sarazins, and [thei] were mo than
seven thousande on horsebak.
And on the tothir side was Arthur well armed and alle his companye, and thei
were alle richely horsed. And Merlin bar that day the baner, and he comaunded
hem alle that as dere as thei heilden her owen bodies, that thei sholde sue that
baner all that day in what place that it yede. And thei seide alle that thei so wolden.
Than thei set forth her wey thourgh the town, so fresch and richely armed that no
peple myght be better, and thei were forty-one withoute Merlin that bar the baner,
soche oon that for a grete merveile was beholden of oon and other that day; for he
bar a dragon that was not right grete and the taile was a fadome and an half of
lengthe tortue, and he hadde a wide throte that the tongue semed braulinge ever,
and it semed sparkles of fier that sprongen up into the heire of his throte.
With that com the geauntes and the sarazins and smote theire speres upon the
yates of the town, and after turned down the medowes, for thei fonde no man that
yaf hem ansuere, and gadered togeder alle the prayes of bestes that were in the
medowes. And Merlin eschuwed alle that were in the stretes of the town and rode
thourgh hem even to the yates with his meyné, and seide than to the porter, "Lete
oute, for it is tyme." And the porter seide thei sholde not oute of the yates till the
kynge hadde comaunded. "What!" seide Merlin, "makeste thow daungerof that I
have as grete power as thow?" Than Merlin caught the flayle of the yate and
plukked it to hym, and yede oute as lightly as it hadde not have ben lokked, and
than departed oute, magré how he grucchid.
Whan these forty-two felowes weren oute of the towne, than the gate was as
close as it hadde never ben opened at that tyme. And of that merveile blissid the
Kynge Ban and the Kynge Boors his brother and alle the tother. And Merlin priked
faste his horse till he overtoke a grete company of sarazins that were two thousande
or mo that ledde grete plenté of beestes. And Merlin frusht amonge hem with his
banere and his companye with hym, and leyde on sore strokes and in her metynge
overthrew alle that thei countred. And in lesse than an hour thei hadde hem so
slayn and chased that thei toke the pray and ledde it to the yates of the town. But
thei hadde gon but a while whan thei saugh four kynges com with fifteen thousande
men of armes that ledde so grete cariage of robbery that thei hadde piled thourgh
the contrey, and were towarde the see. Whan Merlin hem saugh he seide to his
felowes, "Suweth me!" and thei so diden. And it fill so that anoon as Merlin hadde
caste a charme, there rose soche a wynde and storme so grete that the powder and
the duste arose with the wynde and smote in the visages of the geauntes and sarazins
that oon myght not right wele knowe another.
And anoon as the forty-two felowes were in amonge hem, thei slowe and
overthrewe so many that it was wonder to thinke. And than comaunded the Kynge
Leodogan to open the yates; than issed oute first the stiwarde Cleodales formeste
with four thousand men of armes, and fonde the yate close whereas thei yssed
oute, that foughten agein fifteen thousand men so harde that it was merveille.
Than com Cleodalis with his banere and smote in amonge the presse right hidously.
Ther sholde ye have herde grete brekinge of speres and grete noyse of swerdes
upon helmes and upon sheldes, that the sownde was herde into the citee clerly.
Ther was grete defoulinge of men and horse, but ther theforty-two felowes shewed
merveiles with her bodies.
Whan these four kynges saugh that these were amonge hem medelinge, thei
departed her peple in tweyne and left eight thousand fightinge stille; and seven
thousand rode agein the banere of Kynge Leodogan that thei saugh come oute of
the town. And the ton rode agein the tother full fiercely; and whan thei neighed
nygh, thei lowed ther speres and yaf togeder so grete strokes upon sheldes that
thei perced haubrekes and dismailed, and many ther were throwen to grounde
sore bledynge with stroke of speres. And many ther were that passed thourgh
withoute fallinge. Whan the speres were broken, thei leide honde to swerdes and
begonne the bataile grete and merveilouse. But ther sholde ye have seyn the
Knyghtes of the Rounde Table do wondres, and thei were but two hundred and
fifty, and thei that were fightinge with hem were seven thousand; and so were the
Knyghtes of the Rounde Table at gret myschief, for thei behoved to disparble,
whethir thei wolde or noon, and voyde the place. But thei heilde hem togeder so
close and streite that noon myght hem perce ne entyr in amonge hem.
Whan the Kynge Riolent and the Kynge Placiens saugh that so litill a peple
withstode so grete a power as thei were, thei hadde therof grete merveile and
grete dispyte. Than thei cried theire ensigne and swore that never oon of hem
sholde ascape. Than thei yaf hem a grete shoure and a felonouse, for at that shofte
thei overthrewe mo than forty, and moche thei hem peyned hem to diffoule and to
maymen; but her felowes were upon hem arrestynge, and hem deffended from
theire enmyes with her swerdes with all theire myght.
And than it fill that the Kynge Leodogan was throwen fro his horse full lothly,
and thei token hym with strengthe and ledde hym toward prison with moo than
five hundred, into the hoste of Kynge Rion of Irlonde; and thei hym ledde full
fiercely, for thei wende wele that alle here werre hadde be fynysshed. And so thei
ledde the Kynge Leodogan in all the haste that thei myght. And whan theKynge
Leodogan saugh hym so mysfallen and that his enmyes hadde hym taken, he
sowowned often tymes and made grete sorowe. And thei that hym ledden spedden
hem so faste that thei were fro the town two myle.
Full grete was the noyse of the seven thousand and the two hundred fifty
Knyghtes of the Rounde Table that were full hevy and wroth for the kynge that
thei hadde loste; and than [thei] seide amonge hem and assured togeder, seth it
was com therto and that thei saugh all sholde be loste, that thei wolde avenge her
shame and deth as longe as they myght lyven. Than thei sette her bakkes eche to
other, and hem deffended merveilously and [made] soche slaughter of men and
horse aboute hem withoute remevynge oute of place; and so moche peyne and
traveile thei suffred that thei that were at the wyndowes of the palise that saugh
the merveile wepte for pité. And Gonnore, the doughter of Kynge Leodogan, whan
she saugh her fader ledde amonge his enmyes, she made so gret sorowe that nygh
she slowe hirself for doell. But now lete us cesse to speke of hem till tyme cometh
agein and speke of the Kynge Arthur and his felowes, how that thei have spedde
in the bataile agein the seven thousande with the stiwarde Cleodalis of Tamelide.
Now seith the storie that stronge and crewell was the stour theras the bateile
was, whereas the forty-two felowes and the four thousand that were with Cleodalis
the stiwarde that foughten agein the seven thousand sarazins. And many ther were
slayn that lay grennynge on the grounde. And whan thei hadde longe tyme fought
togeder, Merlin rode a grete walop oute of the bataile and cried to his felowes that
thei sholde sue hym; and thei so dide in grete haste and rode as faste as the horse
myght hem bere, till that thei were passed all theire peple. And than thei encresed
her pas gretter and rode towarde the siege the right wey theras the geauntes and
the sarazins were, till that thei come in a valey that was right depe; and ther thei
overtoke the five hundred sarasins that ledde the Kynge Leodogan. And as soone
as Merlin hym saugh he cried, "Now, lordinges, upon hem! For ye be bytrayed
and deed yef eny of hem ascape!"
Than thei drive in amonge hem as tempest of thunder and kilde and slough all
that thei raught a right stroke in her comynge; and ther ne was noon of the forty-
one but he slowe or maymed whom that he mette. Ther sholde ye have seyn soche
martirdom and soche slaughter of men and of horse that noon ne myght ascape, so
were thei supprised and astonyed, saf oonly fyve that ascaped, fleinge thei rought
never what wey.
Thus have thei rescowed the Kynge Leodogan. And whan the kynge saugh the
grete martire and the occision that so fewe peple hadde don agein so many, he
merveyled gretly what thei myght be. Than he beheilde and knewe it was the
dragon that Merlyn bar. Than knewe he wele that it were the sowdiours that he
hadde withholden, and than he thanked God of the socoure that He hadde hym
sente. Than com Merlin to hym, and than he rested. Whan [he] saugh the Kynge
Leodogan bounden, he alight, and so dide Bretell. And [thei] hym unbounden, and
right his armoure, and sethen made hym to lepe on a steede that was stronge and
swyfht. And the kynge hem thonkeden hertely of the servise thei hadde hym don.
Than cried Merlin, "Gentill kynghtes, what tarye ye heere so longe? Suweth
me!" Than he rode a grete raundon towarde the town where the Knyghtes of the
Rounde Table were at gret myschief, that of two hundred and fifty ne were but
twenty on horsebak, but deffended hem on fote as wilde bores. And Merlin bar
the baner before and rode as faste as he myght, and his felowes also that theire
horses swetten. And the dragon that Merlin bar caste oute gret flames of fiere that
it sparkeled up in the ayre, that thei upon the walles of the town saugh the clernesse
of the light half a myle longe.
Whan thei of the citee saugh the kynge that was her lorde and saugh it were the
forty-two felowes and with hem the Kynge Leodogan that thei hadde rescued, thei
hadde grete joye. And whan Gonnore this saugh, she spronge for joye and merveiled
what the kynghtes were that com in that company. And thei com as faste as thun-
der so harde amonge her enmyes, and in her comynge echthrewe oone to grounde.
And as soone as the forty-two felowes were smyten in amonge hem, ther began a
grete bataile and soche slaughter of men and horse that the maiden that was lenynge
oute at the wyndowes of the paleise herde the grete strokes.
Ther yaf the Kynge Ban of Benoyk many strokes with Corchense, his gode
swerde; for whom he arafte a full stroke, ther waranted hym neither shelde ne
haubreke ne noon armure that he kutte all thourghoute at oon stroke. And many
sithes he smote bothe horse and man to grounde at a stroke, and so dide hys
brother, the Kynge Boors of Gannes. And the sarazins hem beheilde for grete
merveile that thei saugh hem do. And the Kynge Arthur dide soche merveiles with
Calibourne, his gode swerde, for ther agein myght noon armure endure were it
never so stronge, for what he araught was at his endynge forever.
Grete was the bataile before the towne of Toraise theras the two hundred fifty
Knyghtes of the Rounde Table and the forty-two felowes [foughten] agein the
sarazins; but thei have so foughten that of the seven thousand beth lefte but five
thousand; wherfore thei beth sory and wroth for this Kynge Canlent that thei have
loste. And than fill it so that the Kynge Ban mette with Kynge Clarion that was
the moste man of the hoste of alle the geauntes. And the storye seith that the
Kynge Ban was a moche knyght of body and a stronge, and coragous and hardy.
The kynge heilde Corchense, his gode suerde, and smote the Kynge Clarion so
sore upon the helme that he slit it dowon to the eere; the stroke fill upon the lifte
shulder that he slitte hym to the girdell. And the Kynge Boors so smote Sarmedon
the ganfanouer that he kutte of the arme with all the sheilde, and the baner fill to
the erthe. This stroke saugh the Kynge Leodogan and seide, "Now be there no
knyghtes but these that so well conne helpe at nede."
And whan the geauntes saugh theire lord deed and her baner fallen, thei turned
to flight, oon here, another there. And than com oute of the town knyghtes and
sergeauntes two thousande and begonne the chase upon hem that turned to flight.
But Merlin turned not that wey as thei fledde, but wente to the bataile theras
Cleodalis faught fercely with four thousand men agein eight thousand. Whan Merlin
com to the bataile, he fonde Cleodalis was on fote fightinge and heilde yet the
baner upright, and his men aboute hym renged, that well hym deffended as wor-
thy men. But thei were at grete myscheif and in poynte to have hadde grete losse
in short tyme, whan Merlin com drivinge amonge hem with his dragon and his
forty-one felowes, of whiche ye have herde that in her comynge ferde as tempeste;
and therto thei were alle so well horsed that no men myght be better, and the
Kynge Leodogan was ever with hem that in no wise wolde hem leten. And whan
these forty-two felowes were in amonge the geauntes, ther was soche marteleise
and soche noise as so many carpenteres in a wode.
Ther was stronge stour and fell and dolerouse, for ther sholde ye have sein
knyghtes and sergeauntes falle as thikke as it hadde be reyn. Ther sholde ye se
stedes and horse renne maisterles, their reynes trailynge undir fote, wherof the
sadeles were all blody of knyghtes that therynne hadde be slayn. Ther sholde ye
have herde soche bruyt and soche noyse and cry that it was merveile and grete
doel to here. Ther dide the forty-two felowes so well that it was spoken of longe
tyme after her deth in that contrey. And the storye seith thei mangled and slow so
many that by the traces oon myght have sued half a day every wey of the deed
bodies and horse that thei hadde wounded, as thei that nought ne cessed ne rested.
And therfore me semeth reson to reherse the names of tho worthi men.
The first was Kynge Ban of Benoyk, and the seconde was Kynge Boors of
Gannes, and the thirde was Kynge Arthur, and the forthe was Antor, the fifth was
Ulfin, the sixth was Bretell, the seventh was Kay, the eighth Lucas the Botiller,
the ninth was Gifflet, the tenth Maret de la Roche, the eleventh Drias de la Forest
Savage, the twelfth Belias de Amerous of Maydons Castell, the thirteenth
Flaundryns le Bret, the fourteenth Ladynas de Benoyk, the fifteenth Amoret le
Brun, the sixteenth Anticolas le Rous, the seventeenth Blois del Casset, the eigh-
teenth Blioberis, the nineteenth Canade, the twentieth Meliadus le Bloys, the twenty-
first Aladan the Crespes, the twenty-second Placidas ly Gays, the twenty-third
Leonpadys of the Playn, the twenty-fourth Jerohas Lenches, the twenty-fifth
Christofer de la Roche Byse, the twenty-sixth Ayglin de Vaus, the twenty-sev-
enth Calogrevaunt, the twenty-eight Aguysale de Desirouse, the twenty-ninth
Agresiaux the nevew of the Wise Lady of the Foreste Withoute Returne, the thir-
tieth Chalis the Orpheyn, the thirty-first Grires de Lambal, the thirty-second Kehedin
de Belly, the thirty-third Meranges de Porlenges, the thirty-fourth Gosnayus Cadrus,
the thirty-fifth Clarias of Gaule, the thirty-sixth the Lays Hardy, the thirty-sev-
enth Amadius the Proude, the thirty-eighth Osenayn Cors Hardy, the thirty-ninth
Galescowde, the fortieth Gales, the forty-first Bleoris the sone of Kynge Boors,
the forty-second was Merlin; and the forty-third was the Kynge Leodogan, that in
no wise wolde hem leve.
These forty-three worthi knyghtes wente to the rescew of Cleodalis, the Stiwarde
of Tamelide, that was a noble knyght and right trewe and full of grete hardynesse;
and well it shewde that for noon unkyndenesse that the Kynge Leodogan hadde
don agein hym, he wolde hym not forsake ne leve hym in his myscheif in no nede
that he was in; but therynne he dide moche more than many other wolde have
don, and I shall sey yow the cause why.
This was the troweth, that the Kynge Leodogan hadde a wif, a lady of grete
bewté and of high lynage; and whan he hadde brought here into Tamelide out of
her fader londe after that he hadde her wedded, this lady brought with hire a
mayden that was of grete bewté. This maiden loved the stiward so moche that on
a day he asked hir of the Kynge Leodogan for to have her to his wif, that many a
day hadde hym served; and the Kynge hym graunted for his gode servise. And
whan thei were maried and she satte at the table amonge other ladyes and she was
richely arayed, the kynge liked moche hir bewté; and soche a fantasie fill in his
herte that he cowde not it remeve, and he hym covered in the beste maner that he
cowde; and she was withoute faile oon of the feirest of the worlde. Till it fill on a
Feste of Seint John that the kynge sente Cleodalis upon a journey agein the Saisnes
that upon hym werred that tyme, and the lady that was lefte with the quene for
companye that moche her lovid with grete love.
Hit fill on a nyght that the Kynge Leodogan lay by the quene, and that nyght
upon hir he begat a doughter that was cleped Gonnore whan she was baptised, the
whiche after was of merveilouse bewté and the wif of Kynge Arthur. And this
lady that was wif to Kynge Leodogan was a goode lady and holy of livinge and
hadde an usage to arise on nyghtes and go to chirche to sey Matyns and to heere
all servyse to messe. That nyght that the quene hadde conceyved Gonnore her
doughter, she yede to Matyns and com by the stiwardes wif and fonde her slepynge
and wolde not her awake; but wente and lefte her lyinge aslepe, and wente forth
alone to the cherche that was faste by, with hir sawter in her hande. And the
kynge, that longe hadde desired to speke with that lady, arose as soone as the
quene was gon, and dide oute the taperes that were brennynge and than wente to
ly by the stiwardes wif. And whan the lady felte oon lyinge by her, she asked what
he was, all affraied; and than he ansuerde how it was he, and bad hir be stille, and
seide yef she made eny noyse she sholde be deed. The lady her deffended inowgh
as with speche, but she durste not crye ne make no noyse; but litill availed her
defense for the kynge by hir lay; and on hir he gat a doughter, the same nyght that
he hadde geten Gonnore on his wif.
And whan the quene was delyvered, ther was founde upon the childes reynes a
litill crosse like a crowne for a kynge; and as soone as the quene was delyvered,
the stiwardes wif began to traveyle, and hadde a doughter of feire bewté, and
[she] was so like the quene's doughter that oon cowde not knowe oon from an-
other but by the crosse upon her reynes. And eche of hem hight Gonnere in bapteme;
and [thei] were norrisshed and brought up togeder till that the quene was deed.
And the kynge yet was not keled of the love of the stiwarde's wif, and he her toke
and shet her in a castell, for he wolde not the stiwarde sholde speke with hir.
In soche maner he heilde her more that five yere, till that the stiwarde's frendes
spake unto hym; and he seide he wolde not faile the kynge while he hadde werre,
and yet the same tyme that Kynge Arthur com for to serve, he hir heilde in the
selve maner; and yet for all this the stiwarde never feyned to serve. But now lete
us retourne to speke of the stiwarde ther he is fightynge on fote amonge the
gyauntes, for all betyme we shull speke of the twey Gonnores whan the mater
fallith therto.
 
[Summary. A lengthy battle against King Rion's forces ensues. Both Arthur's group
of Forty-two Knights and the Knights of the Round Table do many valiant deeds,
including rescuing Cleodalis the steward from the enemy's grasp. Merlin remains in
the thick of the
battle with his dragon banner; and while the ladies of Tamelide look
on, Arthur wields his sword Calibourne with great success. King Rion's troops are
finally put to flight, but Rion vows he will not leave the land until King Leodegan has
been captured. Fols. 73v (line 34)-77v (line 10).]

 
Now seith the booke that gladde and joyfull were thei of the town of Toraise for
the discounfiture of the Saisnes that were chased of so small a peple, for thei were
at the bygynnynge but six thousand and three hundred, and the Saisnes were more
than fifteen thousand; and [thei] were discounfited be the counseile of Merlin that
moche hem helped, and by the Knyghtes of the Rounde Table, and also of the
forty-two sowdioures. And as the booke seith, whan thei hadde chased the Saisnes
unto nyght, that than thei returned to Toraise gladde and mery, and fonde the
kynge in the town that his men hadde remounted and sette on horse. And whan he
knewe that the sowdiours com, he wente hem ageins and made of hem the grettest
joye that eny man myght, and fonde Antor and Gifflet and Kay and Lucas the
Botiller and alle the other felowes hool and sounde, of whom thei hadden had grete
drede that thei hadden be deed or elles taken. And ther was founde grete wynnynge,
and the kynge made it to be take and presented to the sowdiours that he hadde
withholden. And he seide he myght it no better employe for thei hadde it all wonne.
"And myself," seide the Kynge Leodogan, "have thei rescued fro deth and fro
prison."
And whan thei saugh the grete worschip that the kynge hem dide, thei thanked
hym hertely and seide that thei wolde it not, for in tyme comynge thei [wolde]
resceve his yeftes and take of hym other fee. And the kynge seide seth thei wolde
it not resceyve that thei sholde it departe and yeve theras thei wolden. Than com
Merlin to the thre kynges and bad hem take it. And thei it token and yaf it theras
Merlin hem assigned, that thei ne lefte not to hemself the valewe of a peny. And
thei that it hadden, thanked and preised moche the sowdiours, alle tho that hem
knewen, and also thei [that] knewen hem nothynge. And that so moche were thei
beloved in the contrey for her largesse be the counseile of Merlin that nought was
spoken of in the contrey but of the sowdiours. And the Kynge Arthur yaf so
moche to his ooste and to his wif of horse and palfreyes and robes that alle ther
lyves after were thei riche.
Whan the Kynge Arthur hadde departed the richesse that was wonne of the
Saisnes, thei entred into the town; and the Kynge Leodogan wolde not suffre hem
in no wise to alight but at his paleise with hym, ne never after wolde he lete hem
be oute of his companye, and with the Knyghtes of the Rounde Table. And whan
thei were unarmed, the Kynge made his doughter to aray hem in riche robes and
made her take warme water in basyns of silver and bare to the thre kynges and
hem serve. But Arthur wolde not take her servyse till that the Kynge Leodogan
and Merlin comaunded hym and made hym to take it. And the maiden hersilf
wosh his visage and his nekke and dried it full softely with a towaile, and than
after to the tother twey kynges.
And the tother Gonnore that was of the stiwarde's wif and the other maydenes
served the othere knyghtes; and whan the kynge's doughter hadde served the thre
kynges, than she served hir fader. And whan thei were waisch, the maiden put on
ech of hem a mantell aboute her nekkes. And the Kynge Arthur was right feire,
and the maiden hym beheilde moche, and he her. And she seide softely to herself
that well were that maiden that so feire a knyght wolde requere hir of love, and
namely so gode a knyght as is this. And well ought she to be shamed ever after
that hym denyed.
Anoon were the tables set, and whan the mete was redy thei satte alle the
knyghtes therynne; but the Knyghtes of the Rounde Table seten with the sowdiours
at table be hemself. And the Kynge Ban and the Kynge Boors sette the Kynge
Arthur betwene hem two and dide hym grete honour as affiered to so high a man.
And therof toke the Kynge Leodogan goode hede, that by hem satte side by syde
at the heede of the table, and thought well in his corage that by the honour and the
reverence that thei to hym bar that he was lorde over alle, and merveiled sore
what he myght be, and grete desire he hadde for to knowe the trowthe what he
was, and thought in his herte that, "And it were plesynge to God that he hadde my
doughter spoused, for trewly I can not thynke that so high prowesse myght be
shewed in soche a childe but yef he were come of right high lynage; other elles I
trowe that it be som spirituell man that God hath me sente for to deffende this
reame, nought for me but for Cristynté and Holy Cherche to mayntene." And ther-
to he seide ne yede he not oute of this towne withoute leve of the porter.
At this soper the Kynge Leodogan satte stille in a grete stodye, and lasted longe;
and it fill in his mynde how that he hym rescued in the depe valay with the forty-
one felowes agein five hundred knyghtes that ledde hym to prison, and remembrede
alle the prowesses that he hadde sein hym do; and so sadly he sat in that thought
that alle thei were troubled and lefte theire mete. Of this was war Hervy de Ryvel
and was therfore sory in his herte, and aroos and yede to hym full wroth to the
heede of the table and seide, "Sir, I saugh never yow so mystake youreself, ne
never I saugh yow so abaisshed, for ye ought well to make joye to these worthi
men; and ye thenke as that ye were in a dreme, and I merveile moche of youre
grete wisdome where it is become."
Than the kynge yaf a grete sigh and loked on Hervy and seide, "Hervy, frende,
I thought upon the moste worthi man of the worlde, fro the whiche I myght not me
withdrawe; and yef thow knewe what my thought were, thow woldest not me
blame." And he seide, "Sir, it may well be so; but now at this tyme cesseth till
eftesones, for this is no place now therto, but maketh joye to these barouns and
disporte yow, for ye have at this tyme to moche yow mystaken save yourehonoure."
"Gramercy, feire frende," seide the Kynge, "I knowe well that I have mysdon."
Then Hervy yede and sat down by his felowes. And the kynge tho spake to the
barouns merily.
And the maiden that was the doughter of Kynge Leodogan served Arthur upon
her kne of wyne with hir fader cuppe. And Arthur hir beheilde full debonerly, and
[it] plesed hym wele that he saugh hir so nygh, for she was the feirest lady that
was in all Breteigne in that tyme. And the mayden was fayre and hadde on hir
heede a riche chapelet of precious stones, and her visage fressh and wele colowred,
so entermedled white and redde so naturally that it neded nother more ne lesse;
and her shulderes streyghte and even and merveylously well shapen of body, for
she was sklender aboute the flankes and the haunche lowe and comly well sittynge,
and of alle fetures the feirest shapen that myght be founde in eny londe; and yef
she hadde grete bewté therto, she hadde as moche bounté of valour, of curtesie,
and nurture.
Whan Arthur saugh this mayden that hadde so grete bewté, he beheilde her
with a gladde chere, and saugh her pappes smale and rounde as two smale appelis
that were harde; and her flessh whitter than snowe and was not to fatte ne to
sklendir; and he coveyted her gretly in his herte that he waxe all pensif, and lefte
his mete and turned his chere another wey, for he wolde not the two kynges ne
noon other hym aperceyved. Than the mayden profered hym the cuppe and seide,
"Sir, drynke, and displese yow not though I clepe yow not be youre name; and be
ye not abaisshed at youre sopere, for at armes ye do not faile at no nede, and well
it shewed this day where ye were beholden of five thousand that nothynge yow
dide knowe but by sight."
And he turned and seide, "Feire lady, with goode will, and gramercy of youre
servyse. And God graunte me power that I may yow this guerdon yelde." "Sir,"
seide she, "ye have quyte it double more than I may deserve, for ye have rescued
my lorde my fader, ye and youre companye, that was amonge so many ofhis
enmyes that ledde hym to prison." And he satte stille withoute ansuere. "And,"
quod the lady, "was ther moche more, for here before the yates at the brigge-foote
ye shewed well sembelant that it yow greved, and that ye were sory for his anoye
theras he was unhorsed amonge his enmyes and his horse under hym slayn. For
ye slow hym that hym dide overthrowe, and ye youreself were in aventure of deth
hym to rescuen, and so wele ye dide that thei were fayn to leve the feelde."
Thus spake the doughter of Kynge Leodogan to Arthur, but he spake no worde
agein but toke the cuppe and dranke with goode will and after comaunded the
mayden to arise, for to longe hadde she kneled; but the kynge her fader ne wolde
not. Thus were thei served right highly of alle thynges that man myght devise.
And whan the clothes sholde be taken up, the Kynge Ban seide to Kynge Leodogan
that satte nexte by hys side, "Sir," seide the Kynge Ban, "I have grete merveile of
yow that be so wise and worthy a man that have not maried youre doughter to som
high prynce that myght yow helpe in youre werres, for she is now wele woxen
and therto right wise; and as me semeth, ye have no mo heyres to whom youre
londe shall descende after youre deth; and therfore ye sholde here before have her
sette to some noble prynce."
"Certes, sir," seide Leodogan, "I have be letted by the werre that me sore hath
greved and longe dured, for it is seven yere passed that the Kynge Rion of
Denmarke and of Irelonde ne cessed never upon me to werre; ne never seth com
ther no man in this londe to whom I ought hir to yeve. But so helpe me God, yef
I myght fynde a yonge bacheler that were a worthi man of armes that myght wele
endure peyne and travayle to meyntene my werre, to hym wolde I yeve my doughter
yef he wolde her take, and alle my londe after my desesse, that never shall I spare
for high lynage ne grete richesse of lordeschip. And that it plesed oure Lorde
Jhesu that it myght ben he that I thynke now in my mynde, and trewly than sholde
she be maried withynne these thre dayes unto a feire yonge bacheler that is full of
high prowesse; and trewly, I suppose in my corage thathe be of hiher astate than
am I." And Merlin beheilde the Kynge Boors and began to smyle and made hym a
signe that it was seide for the Kynge Arthur; and withoute faile, for hym was it
seide.
Than begonne thei to speke of many thynges and turned her tales other weyes,
for more wolde thei not speke therof at that tyme. That perceyvede well the
Kynge Leodogan that thei heilde no cure to maytene that tale, and therwith he yaf
a sore sigh, for fayn he wolde that oon hadde hym more therof aresoned. And so
he heilde his pees and herkened yef he myght eny thynge aperceyve in eny manere
what thei were and of what londe, and saugh the joye and the honoure that the
worthi men made to Arthur; and that was a thynge that brought hym more mysese,
and so moche the worthy men of the Rounde Table more than the forty felowes
that were of her companye, that alle that it saugh hadde therof merveile and weren
abasshed. But above alle, hym coveyted the kynge's doughter; and right hertely
she hym loved and mused hereon so moche that she was sore troubeled, and fayn
wolde she have hym to be her lorde and make above alle tho that ever she hadde
seyn before.
And the storyes seyn that she was the wisest lady of all the Bloy Breteyne, and
the feirest and the beste beloved that ever was in the londe or in the contrey, saf
only Helayn that was withouten pere, that was the doughter of Kynge Pelles of
Lytenoys of the Castell of Corbenyk, that was nece to the Kynge Pesceor and of
the seke kynges wounded, wherof the name of the ton was cleped Alain de Lille in
Lytenoys. This Kynge Alain was seke of the woundes of the spere vengeresse,
wherof he was cleped Mehaignyes, for he was wounded thourgh bothe thyghes
with that spere; and his right name was Kynge Alain, and the Kynge Pellynor was
his brother germayn; and this maiden of whom I speke was theire nece and doughter
to Kynge Pelles, brother to these two kynges that I have yow named.
 
[Summary. After dinner, Merlin tells Arthur, Ban, and Bors what has been happen-
ing in Logres during their absence, particularly extolling the deeds of the Young
Squires in defending Arthur's land against the Saxons. During this same time that
Arthur has been helping Leodegan and the Young Squires have been protecting Logres,
the rebel kings have been fighting the Saxons in their own homelands. Another group
of Young Squires -- including Sagremor, the nephew of the emperor of Constantinople;
Ewain of the White Hands and his half-brother Ewain Avoutres, sons of King Uriens;
Dodinell the Savage, son of King Belynans of South Wales; and Kay Destranx and
Kehedin -- having heard of the deeds of Gawain and his brothers, set off toward
Logres to meet the other Squires and to be knighted by Arthur. Fols. 79v (line 16)-
90r (line 11).]

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