The Miller and his Tale

"The Miller rode bravely at the head..."

The Miller and his Tale

"The Millere was a stout carl for the nones;
Ful byg he was of brawn, and eek of bones.
That proved wel, for over al ther he cam,
At wrastlynge he wolde have alwey the ram.
He was short-sholdred, brood, a thikke knarre;
Ther was no dore that he nolde heve of harre,
Or breke it at a rennyng with his heed.
His berd as any sowe or fox was reed,
And therto brood, as though it were a spade." (545-553)

The Miller tells a fabliaux about a carpenter named John, who is swindled by his wife Alisoun and their boarder, Nicholas.  Alisoun and Nicholas's dalliance is complicated by another would-be lover, Absolon, who interrupts their night together.  After being tricked by Alisoun, Absolon returns and takes vengeance - on Nicholas, who has tried to join Alisoun in mocking Absolon.
Bibliography

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Riverside Chaucer. Ed. Larry D. Benson. 3rd ed. Boston: Houghton, 1987.