The Chaucer Pilgrim and His Tales

"He has a waist as fairly-shaped as mine."

The Chaucer Pilgrim and His Tales

"Til that oure Hooste japen tho bigan,
And thanne at erst he looked upon me,
And seyde thus: 'What man artow?' quod he;
'Thou lookest as thou woldest fynde an hare,
For evere upon the ground I se thee stare.
Approche neer, and looke up murily.
Now war yow, sires, and lat this man have place!'"

The Chaucer pilgrim starts by telling the tale of Sir Thopas, a romance that is interrupted by the Host, who declares that Chaucer's "rymyng is nat woorth a toord!" (2120).  Instead, Chaucer turns to the long, moral prose tale of Melibee.
Bibliography

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Riverside Chaucer . Ed. Larry D. Benson. 3rd ed. Boston: Houghton, 1987.