Bibliography of Gaelic Arthurian Literature

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Bibliography of Gaelic Arthurian Literature

by: Linda Gowans (Author)
from: The Camelot Project  2002; last updated 2018

This bibliography covers works in Gaelic from Ireland and Scotland (plus one from Nova Scotia) about Arthur and Arthurian characters: provenance is indicated by (Ir), (Sc) or (Nv) at the end of the entry. It is not designed to cover material relating to the general discussion of Celtic sources for medieval romance. Only reviews of a substantial length have normally been included. The numerical system has been adopted for ease of cross-referencing and future addition.

CONTENTS

Section 1: Texts and Translations
1.1 Early References to an "Arthur"
1.2 Lebor Bretnach (the Irish translation of the Historia Brittonum)
1.3 Prose Works
1.4 Poetic Works
1.5 Genealogical
1.6 Miscellaneous

Section 2: Critical Works
2.1 Early References to an "Arthur"
2.2 Lebor Bretnach (the Irish translation of the Historia Brittonum)
2.3 Prose Works
2.4 Poetic Works
2.5 Genealogical
2.6 Miscellaneous
 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Section 1: Texts and Translations



1.1 Early References to an "Arthur"

"Acallam na Senórach," ed. Whitley Stokes, in Irische Texte, Vol.4, part 1, ed. W. Stokes and E. Windisch. Leipzig: Hirzel, 1900. Artúir, a British prince, appears in an episode connected with the introduction of a new type of horse into Ireland. Another Artúr is one of a list of princes drowned by the lake-monster of Loch Lurgan. (Ir)

Adomnán of Iona: Life of St Columba, trans. with introduction by Richard Sharpe. Penguin: London, 1995, xx + 406 pp. Penguin Classics. Includes Columba's prophecy concerning Artuir son of Áedán (pp. 119-20). Maps and genealogical tables. (Ir/Sc) Adomnán's Life of Columba, ed. and trans. Alan Orr Anderson and Marjorie Ogilvie Anderson. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991, lxxxiv + 263 pp. The text and translation are reprinted without substantial change from the edition of 1961 (Edinburgh and London: Thomas Nelson); other material has been revised by M.O.A. Contains (pp. 32-33) text and translation of the passage concerning Columba's prophecy of the death in battle of "Arturius" (Artuir, son of Áidán, son of Gabrán), and its fulfilment. The Historical Introduction (pp. xix-xxii) discusses battle locations and refers to Irish chronicle entries for the sons of Áidán, king of the Dál Riata. (Ir/Sc)

Agallamh na seanórach, ed. Nessa Ní Shéaghdha, 3 vols. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair, 1942-45. Edition of Irish text. (Ir)

The Annals of Tigernach, ed. and trans. Whitley Stokes, 2 vols. Felinfach: Llanerch, 1993, reprinted from Revue Celtique, 1895/96. Vol. I, p. 178 (from Revue Celtique, 17, p. 138), has a seventh-century "Artuir filio Bicoir Britone." (Ir)

The Book of Leinster, formerly Lebar na Núachongbála, ed. R. I. Best and M.A. O'Brien, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Vol. IV, 1965. The name "Artúr amra" (wondrous Arthur) occurs in a list of warriors killed by Goll mac Morna's men (p. 986, l. 28906). (Ir)

"Cath Boinde," ed. and trans. Joseph O'Neill, Ériu, 2 (1905), pp. 173-85. Includes an Artur, descendant of the king of Scotland (pp. 184-85). See also Ferchuitred Medba, below, this section. (Ir)

Coe, John B. and Simon Young, eds., The Celtic Sources for the Arthurian Legend. Felinfach, Llanerch, 1995, x + 201 pp. A collection of texts, including Irish for characters named Artur in Gaelic tradition, with English translations. (Ir)

Dooley, Ann, "Arthur of the Irish: A Viable Concept?" Arthurian Literature, 21 (2004), 9-28. A new text and translation of the relevant part of Acallam na Senórach is appended to discussion which includes the Irish translation of the Historia Brittonum and genealogical material. (Ir)

"Ferchuitred Medba," ed. O.J. Bergin et al., Anecdota from Irish Manuscripts, Vol. V. Halle: Max Niemeyer, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co., 1913, pp. 17-22. Includes an Artur, descendant of the king of Scotland (p. 22). The title is an alternative for "Cath Boinde," see above. (Ir)

Immram Brain, ed. Séamas Mac Mathúna. Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1985. Reference to an "Artúr Pritene" (pp. 201-02). (Ir)

O'Grady, Standish Hayes, ed. and trans., Silva Gadelica: A Collection of Tales in Irish, 2 vols. Edinburgh: Williams and Norgate, 1892, reprinted New York: Lemma, 1970. Text and translation of Acallam na Senórach in Vol. I, pp. 94-233, Vol. II, pp. 101-265. A facsimile reprint of the translation of Acallam na Senórach was published as The Colloquey of the Elders, trans. Standish O'Grady. Felinfach: Llanerch, 2000, 174 pp. (Ir)

Tales of the Elders of Ireland: A new translation of Acallam na Senórach, trans. Ann Dooley and Harry Roe. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1999, xlviii + 245 pp. Oxford World's Classics. English translation, with introductory material, maps and notes. For Artúir son of Benne Brit, see p. 8 and note pp. 226-27; for Artúr one of the three sons of the King of the Irish Vikings, see p. 128. See "Acallam na Senórach," above. (Ir)


1.2 Lebor Bretnach (the Irish translation of the Historia Brittonum)

Much additional information, Todd's 1848 edition, and a translation, from CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland, at: http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100028

The Book of Lecan. Leabhar Mór Mhic Fhir Bhisigh Leacain, ed. Kathleen Mulchrone. Dublin: Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1937. Facsimile: the Lebor Bretnach portion, containing two copies of the text, is on folios 139r-144v. (Ir)

The Book of Uí Maine otherwise called "The Book of the O'Kelly's", ed. R.A.S. Macalister. Dublin: Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1942. Facsimile: the Lebor Bretnach portion is on folios 35(91)v-37(93)v. (Ir)

The Irish Nennius from L. na hUidre; Homilies & Legends from L. Brecc; Alphabetical Index of Irish Neuter Substantives, ed. Edmund Hogan. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1895. Todd Lecture Series, 6. Text and translation of "The Irish Nennius," a fragment only, but containing the Arthurian section, pp. 1-16. (Ir)

Leabhar Breathnach annso sis. The Irish Version of the Historia Britonum of Nennius, ed. and trans. James Henthorne Todd, with introduction and additional notes by Hon. Algernon Herbert. Dublin: Irish Archaeological Society Journal, 2 (1848). (Ir)

Lebor Bretnach: The Irish Version of the Historia Britonum ascribed to Nennius, ed. A.G. van Hamel. Dublin: Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1932. Text only. (Ir)

Lebor na hUidre: Book of the Dun Cow, ed. R.I. Best and O. Bergin. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1929, reprinted Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1992. Text only: the fragment of Lebor Bretnach is on p. 7-10. (See also The Irish Nennius, above.) (Ir)

Meyer, Kuno, ed., "Mitteilungen aus irischen Handschriften," Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 12 (1918), pp. 358-97. Includes Gaelic text headed "Silvius, Stammvater der Britten" (p. 376), on which Meyer refers the reader to p. 32 of Todd's "Irish Nennius" (see Leabhar Breathnach annso sis, this section, above). (Ir)

Zimmer, Heinrich, trans, in Chronica Minora Saecula, IV-VII, in Monumenta Germaniae Historica, III, ed. Theodor Mommsen. Berlin: Weidmann, 1878, pp. 143-219. Translation into Latin of the Lebor Bretnach. (Ir)


1.3 Prose Works

"An t-Amadán Mór," ed. T. Ó Rabhartaigh and Douglas Hyde, Lia Fáil, 2 (1927), 191-228, with foreword (in Irish) by "An Craoibhín" (Douglas Hyde). Text only of a work, the opening episodes of which closely resemble the Perceval of Chrétien de Troyes. The text is edited from two eighteenth-century MSS. The prose work is normally referred to in this Bibliography as Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir ("The Story of the Great Fool"), as distinguished from the verse Laoi an Amadáin Mhóir ("The Lay of the Great Fool"), which tells an extended version of the concluding portion of the prose tale. (For translation see Hartnett, Section 2.6.) (Ir)

Caithréim Conghail Cláiringhnigh (Martial Career of Conghal Cláiringhneach), ed. and trans. Patrick M. MacSweeney. London: Irish Texts Society, 5 (1904, reprinted 1996). Contains an episode in which Arthur's lost son is restored to him. (Ir)

Campbell, John Francis, ed. & trans., Popular Tales of the West Highlands, vol. II. Edinburgh: Edmonston & Douglas, 1860, new edition Paisley and London: Alexander Gardner, 1890, reprinted Hounslow: Wildwood House, 1983. Includes Gaelic text and translation of Ridire na Sgiatha Deirge ("The Knight of the Red Shield") from John MacGilvray of Colonsay and Alexander Campbell of Islay, with discussion of other versions (pp. 451-93). The protagonist has some of the characteristics of a Perceval figure. (Sc)

Campbell, John Francis, ed. & trans., Popular Tales of the West Highlands, vol. III. Edinburgh: Edmonston & Douglas, 1862, new edition Paisley and London: Alexander Gardner, 1892, reprinted Hounslow: Wildwood House, 1984. Includes "The Story of the Lay of the Great Fool" from Angus MacDonald of South Uist (Gaelic text pp. 192-93, translation and discussion pp. 160-67), told as a preface to the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir. (See Section 1.4.) (Sc)

Clement, David, Hamish Henderson et al., "Alasdair Stewart ('Brian')," Tocher, 29 (1978), 265-301. Includes Gaelic text and English translation of A'Maraiche Mairneal ("The Weatherwise Mariner"), pp. 280-91, a version of the "Girl with the Golden Breast" story similar to Sheen Billy (see below, this section), but with no name supplied for the male protagonist. (Sc)

Curtin, Jeremiah, ed., Hero-Tales of Ireland. London: Macmillan, 1894. Includes translation of "The Amadan Mor and the Gruagach of the Castle of Gold" (pp. 140-62), a tale related to the Eachtra and Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir, from Maurice Fitzgerald of Co. Kerry. (No Arthurian names.) Also includes translation of "Lawn Dyarrig, Son of the King of Erin, and the Knight of Terrible Valley" (pp. 262-82), from John O'Brien of Connemara. This story is a variant of Eachtra Iollainn Airmdheirg ("The Adventures of Iollann of the Bloody Weapons"). The protagonist has brothers named Ur and Arthur, but the story is not itself Arthurian, though an Arthurian variant, Ridire na Sgiatha Deirge ("The Knight of the Red Shield") has developed. See further: Campbell, Popular Tales, Vol. II (this section, above); Bruford, Gaelic Folktales and Medieval Romances (Section 2.6), pp. 84-8, and Gowans, "Arthurian Survivals in Scottish Gaelic" (Section 2.6), pp. 39-44. (Ir/Sc)

Curtin, Jeremiah, ed., Myths and Folk-Lore of Ireland. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1890, reprinted Detroit: Singing Tree, 1968. Reprinted as Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland. New York: Dover, 1975. Includes translation of an unattributed story Kil Arthur (pp. 175-85 in first edition, pp. 113-20 in 1975 reprint). The story is a version of Caoin Artur, see MacGríogóir (this section, below). (Ir)

Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil/Eachtra Mhacaoimh-an-Iolair (The Story of the Crop-Eared Dog/The Story of Eagle-Boy): Two Irish Arthurian Romances, ed. and trans. R. A. Stewart Macalister. London: David Nutt, for The Irish Texts Society, 1908, reprinted London, 1998, with new Introduction by Joseph Falaky Nagy which is also available separately (see Section 2.3). Irish Texts Society, 10. Note: the translator's "Sir Galahad" should be read as "Sir Gawain" throughout. In the first story Gawain adventures with an Indian prince who has been transformed into a dog by his jealous stepmother; in the second an eagle deposits a baby boy at Arthur's feet. (Ir)

Eachtra Mhacaoimh-an-Iolair, Mhic Ríogh na Sorcha (le Brian Ó Corcrán), ed. Iorard de Teiltiún and Seosamh Laoide. Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co., 1912. Gaelic text of "The Story of Eagle-Boy." (Ir)

Giolla an Fhiugha, or, The Lad of the Ferule / Eachtra Cloinne Rígh na h-Ioruaidhe, or, Adventures of the Children of the King of Norway, ed. and trans. Douglas Hyde. London: David Nutt, for the Irish Texts Society, 1899, reprinted 1998 with new Introduction by Máire Ní Mhaonaigh. Irish Texts Society, 1. The second tale includes a variant of the "Grateful Dead" theme in which one of the characters in a list is named as Artúr Ollbhadhach (the mighty Arthur) (pp. 124-25). (Ir)

Jackson, Kenneth, ed., "More Tales from Port Hood, Nova Scotia," Scottish Gaelic Studies, 6, Pt. 2 (1949), 176-88. Includes Gaelic text (pp. 179-83) and English summary (pp. 186-87) of a version of Ridire na Sgiatha Deirge ("The Knight of the Red Shield"), collected from Hector Campbell of Judique in 1946. (Nv)

Kennedy, Patrick, The Bardic Stories of Ireland. Dublin: McGlashan & Gill, London: Marshall, 1871. Includes (pp. 151-55) an English prose version of an Amadán Mór text that contains only the part of the story found in the Lay (which it more closely resembles). (Ir)

Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha: an Early Modern Irish translation of the Quest of the Holy Grail, ed. with English translation by Sheila Falconer. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1953, reprinted 1998, xcix + 394 pp. Substantial introduction and commentary in English. (Ir)

Mac Gríogóir, Aodhmaín, ed., and Seaghan MacCathmhaoil, illus., Fréamhacha na hÉireann. Dublin: Maunsel, 1906. Includes Gaelic text of story Caoin Artur Mac Ríogh Éireann "Caoin Artur son of the king of Ireland" collected from Micheál Ua Fháoláin, Inis Meadhon, Aran (pp. 1-17). Fullest version of this group of tales, concerning a princess set adrift in a wooden box, a decapitated giant with a talking head, and his sister. (Ir)

McKay, John G., ed. & trans., (ed. W. J. Watson et al.), More West Highland Tales: Orally collected by the late J. F. Campbell, vol. 2. Edinburgh and London: Oliver & Boyd, 1960, reprinted Edinburgh: Birlinn, 1994. The story Dòmhnall nach robh glic ("Donald who was not wise"), text and trans. pp. 84-87, includes a "Laughing Maiden", but no Arthurian names. (Sc)

Mhac an tSsaoi, Máire, ed., Dhá Sgéal Artúraíochta, mar atá Eachtra Mhelóra agus Orlando agus Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1946, reprinted 1984. Irish text of two prose Arthurian works, "The story of Melóra and Orlando," and "The Visit of Grey-Thigh." In the first story Arthur's daughter Melóra dresses as a knight to free Orlando from the wiles of Merlin and Sir Mador; the second tells of the profound effect a transformed deer-woman has on Arthur's court. (For translations see Hartnett, Section 2.6.) (Ir)

Mühlhausen, L., "Neue Beiträge zum Perceval-Thema," Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 17 (1928), 1-30. Includes German translation of the opening section of Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir. (See also Section 2.3.) (Ir)

Nettlau, Max, "On Some Irish Translations from Medieval European Literature," Revue Celtique, 10 (1889), 178-91. Gaelic text only of extracts from manuscripts of Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha. (Ir)

Ó Doibhlin, Breandán, Manuail de Litríocht na Gaeilge. Faisicil I: Ar imeall an Choncais, 1500. Dublin: Coiscéim, 2003, xi + 174 pp., illus. Includes, pp. 10-27, modernised key passages from Lorgaireacht an tSoithigh Naofa ("Quest of the Holy Grail"), based on Falconer's 1953 edn. (Ir)

Ó Doibhlin, Breandán, Manuail de Litríocht na Gaeilge. Faisicil II: 1536-1616. Dublin: Coiscéim, 2006, 260 p., illus. Includes commentaries on, and modernised selections of extracts from, Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil (pp. 83-86), Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair (pp. 86-89), and Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir. (Ir)

Ó Duilearga, Séamus, ed., "Cínn Artúir", in Leabhar Stiofáin Uí Ealaoire, ed. Dáithí Ó hÓgáin. Baile Átha Cliath: Comhairle Bhéaloideas Éireann, 1981, pp. 56-65. Gaelic text of a version of Caoin Artur (see MacGríogóir, this section, above). Collected from Stiofán Ó hEalaoire of Ballycullaun, Co. Clare. (Ir)

Ó Duilearga, Séamus, ed., "Fathach an Chloiginn dirig," Béaloideas, 14, 1944, 248-55. Gaelic text of "The read-headed giant," a version of Caoin Artur (see MacGríogóir, this section, above) which does not name the hero. Collected from Seán Carúin of Doolin, Co. Clare. (Ir)

Ó Duilearga, Séamus, ed., "Loinnir Mhac Leabhair," Béaloideas, 15 (1945), 180-201. Gaelic text and English summary of a story in which the Amadán Mór appears as the enemy of the hero. (The story makes use of a popular name: it is not a version of the Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir.) (Ir)

"Orlando agus Melora," ed. Maartje Draak, Béaloideas, 16 (1946), 3-48. Gaelic text, with introduction in English including detailed summary of the story. (For translation see Hartnett, Section 2.6.) (Ir)

Purton, Walter J., "A Note on a Passage in the Irish Version of the Grail Legend," Revue Celtique, 27 (1906), 81-4. Text and translation of a short section of Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha. (Ir)

Robinson, Frank Norris, "Two Fragments of an Irish Romance of the Holy Grail," Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 4 (1903), 381-93. Text and translation of sections of Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha. (Ir)

"Sgeulachd air Sir Uallabh O'Corn," ed. and trans. John Gregorson Campbell, Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, 13, 1886-87, 69-83. The protagonist of this Hebridean tale, who becomes romantically involved with a princess whose brother he has killed, was not recognised by the editor as Sir Gawain (see "Sir Uallabh O Còrn," this section, below). (Sc)

Sheen Billy (the title is derived from a form of Gawain's Gaelic name) - a version of the story of "The Girl with the Golden Breast". No surviving text. See Campbell, J. F., Popular Tales vol. I (Section 2.3) and Gowans, "Arthurian Survivals" (Section 2.6). (Sc)

"Sir Falbh-O-Còrn," ed. anon, An Gaidheal, 5 (1876), 261-62. Short variant of Sir Uallabh O Còrn. Gaelic text only. (Sc)

"Sir Uallabh O Còrn: A Hebridean tale of Sir Gawain," ed. and trans. Linda Gowans, Scottish Gaelic Studies, 18 (1998), 23-55. An edition, translation and discussion of Edinburgh University Library MS Carmichael-Watson 425, a Gaelic tale collected by Rev. John Gregorson Campbell from Donald Cameron on the Isle of Tiree in 1863. Also discusses the "Caoin Artur" group of prose tales from Ireland (see Mac Gríogóir, this section, above). (Ir/Sc)

"The Vision of Merlino", ed. and trans. R.A. Stewart Macalister, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie , 4 (1903), 394-455. An "Infernal Journey," of which the protagonist is Merlino Maligno. (No Arthurian connection other than the name Merlino.) (Ir)


1.4 Poetic Works

For Laoidh an Amadaín Mhóir (in which the Perceval-type hero undergoes a test of his fidelity to his host), see also Curtin, Hero-Tales, and Kennedy, Patrick, Section 1.3. (Ir)

The Bardic Poems of Tadhg Dall Ó Huiginn, ed. and trans. Eleanor Knott, 2 vols. London: Irish Texts Society, 1922, 1926, reprinted 1984, 1983. 1996, with new introduction by Pádraig A. Breatnach. Irish Text Society, 22, 23. References to Arthur in Vol. I, poem 8, Toirdhealbhach Luineach, pp. 50-6, and poem 40, Aisling, pp. 268-71 (Gaelic text); translation and notes in Vol. II. (Ir)

Bergin, Osborn, ed. and trans., Irish Bardic Poetry, ed. David Greene and Fergus Kelly, with foreword by D.A. Binchy. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1970, reprinted 1984. Poem 6, "A Begging Letter," by Fearghal Óg Mac an Bhaird (Gaelic text pp. 41-4, trans. pp. 227-29) refers to Arthur's custom not to eat without a new marvel. The poet lived in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. The poem was first published by Bergin as "Unpublished Irish Poems, V. A Begging Letter," Studies, 8 (1919), pp. 72-6. See also Breatnach and Mhág Craith (this section, below) for the same poem. (Ir)

Breatnach, Pádraig A., "The Aesthetics of Irish Bardic Composition: An Analysis of Fuaras iongnadh, a fhir chumainn by Fearghal Óg Mac an Bhaird," Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, 42 (Winter 2001), 51-72. A reprint of the edition and translation of the "Begging Letter" poem already published by Osborn Bergin (see above, this section), preceded by an article discussing the poet and his poem, and noting a connection with other Irish Arthurian writing. (Ir)

Am Bròn Binn: An Arthurian Ballad in Scottish Gaelic, ed. Linda Gowans. Eastbourne: Gowans, 1992. An edition and translation of the earliest MS (c. 1775), with a comparison and discussion of all 31 known variants of this ballad: "The Sweet, or Melodious, Sorrow," in which Gawain finds a girl who has visited Arthur or appeared to him in a dream. (Note: in the present bibliography published texts only are listed. Details of the location of unpublished versions, including manuscripts and recordings, plus published work relating to the collectors and their informants, are given in the bibliography to Gowans' book.) (Sc)

Cameron, Rev. Alexander, ed. Reliquiae Celticae: Texts, Papers and Studies in Gaelic Literature and Philology, ed. Alexander Macbain and Rev. John Kennedy, 2 vols. Inverness: The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Co., 1892-94. Gaelic texts only of Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir (Vol. I, pp. 289-94), and Bas Artuir ("The Death of Arthur"), a version of Am Bròn Binn (Vol. I, pp. 368-69). (Sc)

Campbell. John Francis, ed., Leabhar na Féinne: Heroic Gaelic Ballads. London: Spottiswoode, 1872, reprinted Shannon: Irish Academic Press, 1972. Gaelic texts only. Includes (under various titles) four versions of the Laoidh an Amadaín Mhóir (pp. 203-08) and two of Am Bròn Binn (p. 208). (Sc)

Campbell, John Francis, ed. & trans., Popular Tales of the West Highlands, vol. III. Edinburgh: Edmonston & Douglas, 1862, new edition Paisley and London: Alexander Gardner, 1892, reprinted Hounslow: Wildwood House, 1984. Includes text and translation of the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir from Angus MacDonald of South Uist and John MacPherson of Gairloch, prefaced by MacDonald's prose tale (see Section 1.3) (pp. 160-93). (Sc)

Campbell, J. L., and Francis Collinson, ed., Hebridean Folksongs, vol. II. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1977. Includes texts and translations of two versions of Am Bròn Binn, one with tune, and the first eight lines and tune of another version, pp. 18-27, 271-73, plus notes pp. 189-93. (Sc)

Carmichael, Alexander (ed. and trans.), Carmina Gadelica, Vol. V, ed. Angus Matheson. Edinburgh and London: Oliver & Boyd, 1954. Includes section on Am Bròn Binn, pp. 85-106, with text and translation of two versions and variants from another six. (Sc)

Carney, James, ed., Poems on the O'Reillys. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1950. Two sixteenth-century poems, nos. 13, anon. (pp. 71-4), and 21, by Aodh Mac an Bhaird mac Diarmada (pp. 105-06), include reference to Balbhuaidh (Gawain). Gaelic texts only, notes in English pp. 206-08, 218-19. (Ir)

Collinson, Francis, The Traditional and National Music of Scotland. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1966. Includes text and translation for part of a version of Am Bròn Binn, with music, pp. 46-48. (Sc)

Cross, Tom Peete, "Notes on the Chastity-Testing Horn and Mantle," Modern Philology, 10 (1913), 289-99. Includes text and translation of "chastity-testing swan" poem (eighteenth century). (Ir)

Duanaire Dhábhidh Uí Bruadair/The Poems of David Ó Bruadair, Part III, ed. and trans. Rev. John C. Mac Erlean. London: Simpkin, Marshall, Kent & Co., for the Irish Texts Society, 1917. Irish Texts Society, 18. Poem 12 is a panegyric on Queen Elizabeth I written by Flann mac Eoghain mhic Craith, c. 1590, comparing the queen to Caesar, King Arthur and Hector (text and translation pp. 64-75). Ó Brudair imitated and answered the poem in his panegyric on King James II, Poem 13 (text and translation pp. 76-95), without any Arthurian reference. (Ir)

Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir, ed. Seán Ua Ceallaigh. Dublin: M.H. Mac Guill & a Mhac, 1911. Gaelic text only. Despite the title, the text is a version of the Laoidh. (Ir)

Graves, Alfred Percival, ed., The Celtic Song Book: Being Representative Folk Songs of the Six Celtic Nations. London: Ernest Benn, 1928. Includes text and translation for part of a version of Am Bròn Binn, with music, pp. 129-31. (Sc)

Henderson, Rev. George, "Arthurian Motifs in Gadhelic Literature," in Miscellany presented to Kuno Meyer, ed. Osborn Bergin and Carl Marstrander, Halle: Max Niemeyer, 1912, pp. 18-33. Includes text and translation of a version of Am Bròn Binn, pp. 28-33. The latter is not identical with the oral version collected by Henderson: see Am Bròn Binn, ed. Gowans (this section, above), pp. 11, 14. (See also Henderson, Section 2.6.) (Sc)

Kennedy-Fraser, Marjory, and Kenneth Macleod, Songs of the Hebrides, vol. III London and New York: Boosey & Co., 1921. Includes an art-song The Sea-Quest, or The Harp-Sorrow: Am Bròn Binn, pp. 175-87, composed using at least two versions of Am Bròn Binn. English and Gaelic text, with music, is given. (Sc)

Leabhar Branach: The Book of the O'Byrnes, ed. Seán Mac Airt. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1944. Poem 24 by Áithios Ó Lorcáin (pp. 97-102) includes reference to Balbhuaidh (Gawain). Gaelic text only; notes in English pp. 367-68. (Ir)

Lorne, The Right Hon. The Marquis of, Memories of Canada and Scotland: Speeches and Verses. Montreal: Dawson Bros., 1884. Includes a verse translation, King Arthur and the Captive Maiden, followed by the Gaelic text, Seann Oran Gailic ("Old Gaelic Song"), of a version of Am Bròn Binn, pp. 148-55. (Not noted in Am Bròn Binn, ed. Gowans, 1992.) (Sc)

Mhág Craith, Cuthbert, ed., Dán na mBráthar Mionúr. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2 vols., Vol. 1, 1967 (Gaelic texts), Vol. 2, 1980 (English translations, and notes in Irish). An anthology of poems by or about Irish Franciscans, including (no. 24, Vol. 1, pp. 121-24, Vol. 2, pp. 56-57, 155) the poem by Fearghal Óg Mac an Bhaird also edited and translated by Bergin (see above, this section). (Ir)

MacFarlane, Malcolm, "Studies in Gaelic Music," Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, 27 (1908-11), pp. 47-84. Includes the opening verse of a text of the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir (unusually, a chorus version), with tune in tonic sol-fa notation (pp. 53-4). (Note: for tunes see also McDonald, Morison and Shields, Section 2.4.) (Sc)

McKenna, L., ed., Dioghluim Dána. Dublin: Oifig an tSoláthair, 1938. Eulogy for the poet's patron Diarmaid Mág Carthaigh, with reference to Arthur (pp. 296-301, notes p. 467). Reprint, with emendations, from "Historical Poems" (see MacKenna, below). (See Dooley, Section 2.4.) (Ir)

McKenna, L, ed., "The Historical Poems of Gofraidh Fionn Ó Dálaigh," The Irish Monthly (1919), 397-403. Eulogy for the poet's patron Diarmaid Mág Carthaigh, with reference to Arthur. (See Dooley, Section 2.4.) (Ir)

Mackenzie, William, "Na h-Iollaireann" (contributed by Alexander Carmichael) in "Leaves from my Celtic Portfolio," Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, 9 (1879-80), 67-74. Three versions of Am Bròn Binn. (Sc)

McLeod, Wilson, and Meg Bateman, ed., with trans. by Meg Bateman, Duanaire na Sracaire/Songbook of the Pillagers: Anthology of Scotland’s Gaelic Verse to 1600. Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2007, lii + 554 p. No. 24 (pp. 140-53, notes pp. 505-06), Maith an Chairt Ceannas na nGaoidheal (“The Headship of the Gaels is Good Charter”), refers to the Campbell chief as heir of Arthur, and his warriors as having the blood of Arthur and of Béine Briot. (See also Watson, “Classic Gaelic Poetry,” below, and Coira, Section 2.5, p. 126.) No. 57 (pp. 312–21, notes pp. 515–16) is a version of Am Bròn Binn reprinted from Carmichael, Carmina Gadelica, Vol. V (see above), with a new translation. (Sc)

Ó Baoill, Colm, and Cathair Ó Dochartaigh, ed., Trí Rainn agus Amhrán: Cnuasach Filíochta. Béal Feirste: Lagan Press, 1996, 122 pp. Irish texts of short, mainly anonymous, poems dated from c. 1675 to c. 1855, which employ a distinctive Irish verse form ("Three verses and a song"). "Táinig go Teaghlach Rí an Domhain" ("there came to the household of the King of the World") (p. 70) tells of a gruagach (a warrior or champion, sometimes an enchanter) who brings to Arthur's court a swan that will only take food or wine from the hand of a chaste woman. "A Iníon tSuairc an Chrutha Ghlé ("O merry girl of the bright appearance") (p. 78) warns the addressee of things to avoid, one danger being the swan brought to the Halla Dearg ("Red Hall") (the site of Arthur's court in several Gaelic texts). There is a CD-ROM version, with apparatus in Irish Gaelic--Brig o Turk, Perthshire: Clann Tuirc, 2005; new edition 2006 with apparatus also in Scottish Gaelic. Both are online at <www.clanntuirc.co.uk >. The two texts cited above are nos. 54 and 62. (Ir)

O'Daly, John, ed. and trans., Laoithe Fiannuigheachta; or, Fenian Poems, Second Series. Dublin: Transactions of the Ossianic Society, 6 (1861). Includes a very full composite text and translation of "Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir," pp. 160-207. Despite the title, the text is that of the verse Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir, not the prose tale. (Ir)

Ó Máille, Tomás, ed. and trans., "A Poem to Tuathal Ó Máille," Revue Celtique, 49 (1932), 166-81. The addressee died in 1416: the poem speaks of "the old country of generous king Arthur" over the sea. (Ir)

O’Rahilly, Cecile, ed.  Five Seventeenth-Century Political Poems. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1952. One of the poems alludes to the prose Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil (pp. 40, 123n.). (Ir)

O'Rahilly, Thomas F, ed., "An Arthurian Ballad," Gadelica, 1 (1912), 246-48. Includes Gaelic text of "chastity-testing swan" poem (eighteenth century). (Ir)

O'Sullivan, Anne, and Pádraig Ó Riain, ed. and trans., Poems on Marcher Lords from a sixteenth-century Tipperary manuscript. London: Irish Texts Society, 1987, 146 pp. Irish Texts Society, 53. Includes (pp. 19-43) an "Elegy for James Purcell, baron of Loughmoe," which gives an account of Arthur's custom not to feast before news of an adventure, the sword in the floating stone, and Galahad's supremacy. (Ir)

Ross, Anne, "Chain Symbolism in Pagan Celtic Religion," Speculum, 34 (1959), 39-59. Includes text and translation of "chastity-testing swan" poem (eighteenth century), p. 52. (See also Ross, Section 2.4.) (Ir)

"An Seabhac" (Pádraig Ó Síochfhradha), ed., Laoithe na Féinne. Dublin: An Chumainn le Béaloideas, 1941. Includes Gaelic text of Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir (pp. 288-302). (Ir)

Sinclair, Rev. A. MacLean (ed.), Clarsach na Coille: Gaelic Poems and Songs by John MacLean, second edition, revised and ed. Hector MacDougall. Glasgow, Alex. MacLaren, 1928. (First edition was Glasgow, 1881, text on p. 263.) Contains Gaelic text of Bruadar Righ Bhreatuinn ("The Dream of the King of Britain") (a version of Am Bròn Binn), pp. 195-96. (Sc)

Stoddart, John, trans., Awen y Gael. Llandybïe: Cyhoeddiadau Barddas, 1987. Includes Y Tristwch Pêr, a modern Welsh translation of Am Bròn Binn, pp. 73-74. (Not noted in Am Bròn Binn, ed. Gowans, 1992.) (Sc)

Tolmie, Frances, One Hundred and Five Songs of Occupation from the Western Isles of Scotland, collected by Frances Tolmie. Felinfach: Llanerch, 1997. (Reprinted from the Journal of the Folk-Song Society, 16 (1911), Vol. IV, part 3, pp. v-xiv, 143-276.) No. 90 (with text, translation and music) is a version of Am Bròn Binn: for correction to the published identity of Tolmie's informant see Am Bròn Binn, ed. Gowans (this section, above), pp. 11-12. (Sc)

Turner, Patrick, ed., Comhchruinneacha do dh'Orain Taghta Ghaidhealach. Edinburgh: T. Stiubhard, 1813. Text of a version of Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir, pp. 342-49. (Sc)

Watson, William J., ed., "Classic Gaelic Poetry of Panegyric in Scotland," Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, 29 (1914-19), 194-235. Includes text of part of the anonymous poem Maith an Chairt Ceannas na nGaoidheal (see McLeod and Bateman, this section, above). (Sc)

Watson, William J., ed. and trans., Scottish Verse from the Book of the Dean of Lismore. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd for the Scottish Gaelic Texts Society, 1937. Scottish Gaelic Texts Society, 1. Poem 14 (text and translation pp. 106-25, notes pp. 283-84), by Giolla Pádraig Mac Lachlainn, addresses James Campbell of Lawers as a descendant of Arthur. James Campbell lived in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Poem 28 (text and translation pp. 212-17, notes pp. 300-01), by Donnchadh mac Dubhghaill Mhaoil, declares that Eoin mac Pádraig, chief of Clan Gregor (who died in 1519) has the blood of Arthur in his veins. (Sc)

Watson, William J., ed. and trans., "Unpublished Gaelic Poetry - IV, V," Scottish Gaelic Studies, 3 (1931), 139-59. Triath na nGaoidheal Giolla-easbuig ("Lord of the Gael is Giolla-easbuig") (Poem 4), compares the Campbell chief to Arthur and describes Arthur's court. Rug eadrain ar iath nAlban ("He has made an intervention on Scotland's soil") (Poem V) uses Irish and classical comparisons. The poems are seventeenth-century: the editor's short introduction attributes them to the bardic family of MacEwen and discusses Campbell genealogy. (Sc)


1.5 Genealogical

See also McLeod and Bateman, Duanaire na Sracaire, and the three items by Watson, William J., in Section 1.4. (Sc)

Black, Ronald, “1467 MS: The Campbells,” West Highland Notes & Queries, Series 3, no. 19 (May 2012), 3-10. An edition and and translation of the Clan Campbell genealogy from National Library of Scotland, Advocates’ MS 72.1.1, linked to the website <www.1467manuscript.co.uk>. Earlier editions are compared and names, including the Arthurian sequence, discussed. (On the scribe, see Ó Baoill, Colm, Section 2.5.) (Sc)

Bugge, Alexander, ed. & trans., On the Fomorians and the Norsemen by Duald MacFirbis. Christiania: J. Chr. Gundersens Bogtrykkeri, for Det Norske Historiske Kildeskriftfond, 1905. An edition, translation and discussion of MacLeod genealogical material which includes the names of Artúr and Balbuaid innis Tile (Gawain). (Ir)

Curtis, Edmund, "The MacQuillan or Mandeville Lords of the Route," Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 44C (1938), pp. 99-113. Includes a genealogy with Artur son of Ambros (p. 102). (Ir)

Mac Firbhisigh, An Dubhaltach, Leabhar Mór na nGenealach: The Great Book of Irish Genealogies, ed. N. Ó Muraíle, 5 vols.  Dublin: de Búrca, 2003-04. Vol. II, §421.2, 422.1, includes, in the context of genealogical history of the men of Scotland, reference to Vortigern, Aurelius, Uther Pendragon, Arthur and Mordred. Genealogical information relating to the MacLeods and the Campbells, and including the name Artúr, is given in  Vol. I, §42.1, and Vol. III, §776.2, §1007.2, §1365.3.  (Ir/Sc)

MacPhail, J. R. N., ed., "Ane Accompt of the Genealogie of the Campbells," in Highland Papers, Vol. II. Edinburgh: Scottish History Society, 1916, pp. 69-111. A section about Arthur (pp. 74-7) includes accounts of how he came to be king, and of his son Smereviemore.  (Sc)

O'Donovan, John, ed. & trans., "The Fomorians and Lochlanns: Pedigrees of MacCabe of Ireland and MacLeod of Scotland," Ulster Journal of Archaeology, First Series, 9 (1861-62), pp. 94-105. MacLeod genealogy containing the names Artur and Balbuaidh Innsi Tile (Gawain). (Ir)

Skene, William F., Celtic Scotland: A History of Ancient Alban, Vol. III: Land and People. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1880, reprinted Manchester, NH: Ayer Co., 1977. Includes an edition and translation of Clan Campbell genealogical material featuring Artur mic Uibher and several other "Artur" names (pp. 458-60). (Sc)


1.6 Miscellaneous and General

The Annals of Ulster (To A.D. 1131). Part I: Text and Translation, ed. Seán Mac Airt and Gearóid Mac Niocaill. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1983. An addition to the entries for A.D. 467 refers to Uter Pendragon's death, King Arthur and the Round Table (pp. 48-9). (Ir)

Céitinn, Seathrún/Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn/The History of Ireland. 4 vols. London: The Irish Texts Society, Vol. I ed. and trans David Comyn, 1902, Vols II and III ed. and trans. Rev. Patrick S. Dineen, 1908, Vol. IV ed. and trans. Rev. Patrick S. Dineen, 1914, all reprinted London, 1987. Irish Texts Society, 4, 8, 9, 15. In vol. I, pp. 12-17, the suggestion that Ireland owed tribute to King Arthur is refuted; vol. II, pp. 396-97, has a short comment on the stones taken by Merlin from Ireland to Britain to form Stonehenge. (Ir)

Keating, Geoffrey, see Céitinn, Seathrún (above). (Ir)

Mac-na-Ceàrdadh, Gilleasbuig, ed., An t-Òranaiche: The Gaelic Songster. Glasgow: Archibald Sinclair and Robert M'Gregor, 1879. Includes anonymous Gaelic poem Teagasg Rìgh Artair ("King Arthur's Teaching"), pp. 465-66, one of the texts arising from the attribution to Arthur of advice normally provided by Cormac mac Airt to his son: see also Hartnett (Section 2.6), pp. 45-6. On the teachings of Cormac see, for example, Douglas Hyde, A Literary History of Ireland from Earliest Times to the Present Day, new edn. with Introduction by Brian Ó Cuív, London: Ernest Benn, and New York: Barnes & Noble, 1967, pp. 246-50, and Eleanor Knott, An Introduction to Irish Syllabic Poetry of the period 1200-1600, second edition, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1994, pp. 39-40 for Gaelic text of an abridged version, notes pp. 92-4. (Sc)

Martin, Martin, A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland. London: Andrew Bell, 1703, reprint Edinburgh: James Thin, 1981 (facsimilie of 1716 edition). Includes description of a small island off the Isle of Skye known as "Bord Cruin (i.e.) a round Table" (p. 168). (Sc)

 

 

Section 2: Critical Works



2.1 Early References to an "Arthur"

Note: see also Fulton, ed. (Section 2.6), Nagy. For references to the surname MacArthur in Scotland see Campbell of Airds (Section 2.5), and Sellar (Section 2.5), p. 111; for Arthur in Ireland see Hartnett (Section 2.6), pp. 46-7.

Bernhardt-House, Phillip A., “Horses, Hounds, and High Kings: A Shared Arthurian Tradition across the Irish Sea?,” in Myth in Celtic Literatures, ed. Joseph Falaky Nagy. CSANA Yearbook, 6 (2007), pp. 11-21. Links Culhwch ac Olwen, the “Artúir mac Béine Brit” episode of the Acallam na Senórach, and the medieval tradition of werewolf tales. (Ir)

Bruce, James Douglas, The Evolution of Arthurian Romance from the Beginnings Down to the Year 1300, second edition with supplement by Alfons Hilka, vol. I. Gloucester, Mass: Peter Smith, 1958. Gives examples of early use of the name Arthur (p. 6). (Ir/Sc)

Dark, Ken, "A Famous Arthur in the Sixth Century? Reconsidering the Origins of the Arthurian Legend," Reading Medieval Studies, 26 (2000), 77-95. Notes a pre-Viking "Artuir" tombstone in Co. Tipperary. (Ir)

Dobbs, Margaret, "Notes on the Lists of Irish Historic Tales," Journal of Celtic Studies, 2 (1958), pp. 45-58. Includes discussion of Aigidecht Artúir (p. 47). (Ir)

Gillies, William, "Arthur in Gaelic Tradition, Part II: Romances and Learned Lore," Camrbidge Medieval Celtic Studies, 3 (1982), 41-75. Discussion, pp. 70-73, of occurrences in early Irish literature of the name Artúr, and of a group of names including Inber and Ibar, which cannot be seen as corresponding directly to Uther but which tend to indicate British connections. (Ir)

Mac Cana, Proinsias, The Learned Tales of Medieval Ireland. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1980. Among the lost tales listed is Aigidecht Artúir ("The Guesting of Arthur") (p. 47, notes pp. 107-08). (Ir)

Meyer, Kuno, "Eine verschollene Artursage," in Festschrift für Ernst Windisch zum siebzigsten Geburtstag. Leipzig: Otto Harrassowitz, 1914, pp. 63-7 (on Aigidecht Artúir). (Ir)

O'Rahilly, Cecile, Ireland and Wales: Their Historical and Literary Relations. London: Longman, Green & Co., 1924. Looks at the use of the name Arthur in the Old Irish period (pp. 92-4). (Ir)

O'Rahilly, Thomas F., Early Irish History and Mythology. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1946, reprinted 1984. Notes examples of the name Artúr (pp. 361-62). (Ir/Sc)

Parsons, Geraldine, “The Structure of Acallam na Senórach,” Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, 55 (Summer 2008), 11–39. Fits the “Artúir mac Benne Brit” tale into a sequence dealing with Clann Morna-Clann Baíscne interaction. (Ir)

Thurneysen, Rudolph, Die irische Helden- und Königsage. Halle: Niemeyer, 1921. Reaction to Meyer's work (see above, this section), p. 515. (Ir)

Vendryes, J., Review of Festschrift für Ernst Windisch, Revue Celtique, 37 (1917-19), 368-72. Includes commentary on Meyer's work (see above, this section). (Ir)


2.2 Lebor Bretnach (the Irish translation of the Historia Brittonum)

Note: only those works on the Historia Brittonum with direct bearing on the Irish translation are included here. See also Dooley, Ann (Section 1.1), and Hartnett (Section 2.6), pp. 51-64.

Clancy, Thomas Owen, "Scotland, the 'Nennian' recension of the Historia Brittonum, and the Lebor Bretnach," in Kings, clerics and chronicles in Scotland 500-1297: Essays in honour of Marjorie Ogilvie Anderson on the occasion of her ninetieth birthday, ed. Simon Taylor. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2000, pp. 87-107. Proposes a Scottish provenance for the "Nennian" recension of the Historia Brittonum as well as for the Lebor Bretnach. (Sc)

Dumville, D., " 'Nennius' and the Historia Brittonum," Studia Celtica, 10-11 (1975-76), 78-95. Discusses the place of the "Nennian" attribution in the textual tradition of the Historia Brittonum, with reference to the Irish text. (Ir)

Dumville, D., "The Textual History of 'Lebor Bretnach': A Preliminary Study," Éigse, 16 (1975-76), 255-73. A survey of the manuscripts of Lebor Bretnach and the Irish textual tradition. (Ir)

Field, P.J.C., "Nennius and his History," Studia Celtica, 30 (1996), pp. 159-65. Cites the Irish translation in discussion of the name of Nennius. (Ir)

Jackson, Kenneth H., "The Poem A Eolcha Alban Uile," Celtica, 3 (1956), 148-67. Discusses personal names considered to be borrowed from the Lebor Bretnach. (Ir/Sc)

Lot, Ferdinand, Nennius et l'Historia Brittonum: étude critique, suivie d'une édition des diverses versions de ce texte, 2 vols. Paris: H. Champion, 1934. Takes issue with statements in the introduction to van Hamel's 1932 edition (pp. 135-42). (Ir)

Vendryes, J., review of Lebor Bretnach: The Irish Version of the Historia Britonum ascribed to Nennius, ed. A.G. van Hamel, Études Celtiques, 3 (1938), 168-70. (Ir)

Zimmer, Heinrich, Nennius Vindicatus: uber Entstehung, Geschichte und Quelllen der Historia Britonum. Berlin: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1893. Refers to Todd's edition of the Irish version (p. 250). (Ir)

Zimmer, Heinrich, "Ein weiteres irisches Zeugnis für Nennius als Autor der Historia Brittonum," Neues Archiv der Gesellsch. f. aeltere deutsche Geschichtskunde, 19 (1894), 436-43. (Ir)


2.3 Prose Works

See also Hartnett (Section 2.6), pp. 101-07, 247-48, for the "spear of King Pisear" in a non-Arthurian Irish text; and pp. 133-34 for the first scholarly identification, in unpublished work by John O'Donovan between 1836 and 1840, of the Arthurian nature of Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir. (Ir) The two works by McHugh in Section 2.4 discuss prose Amadán Mór texts in addition to the verse Laoidh. On prose tales see also Fulton, ed. (Section 2.6). (Ir/Sc)

Anon, review of Caithréim Conghail Cláiringhnigh (Martial Career of Conghal Cláiringhneach), ed. and trans. Patrick M. MacSweeney, The Celtic Review, 1 (1905), 567-69. (Ir)

Besamusca, Bart, and Jessica Quinlan, “The Fringes of Arthurian Fiction,” Arthurian Literature, 29 (2012), 191-242. A survey of the pan-European treatment of Arthurian characters and their world, which includes the Irish Arthurian prose works. (Ir)

Brady, Lindy, “Late Medieval Irish Kingship, Egerton 1782, and the Irish Arthurian Romance Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil (‘The Story of the Crop-Eared Dog’),” Arthurian Literature, 34 (2018), 69-87. Considers the Crop-Eared Dog in a medieval Irish legal context, the portrayal of Arthur, and the historical context of the manuscript (written in 1517).  (Ir)

Breatnach, Caoimhín, "Brian Ó Corcráin and Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair," Éigse, 34 (2004), 44-8. Suggests that Ó Corcráin may be the person for whom the tale was written, not its author. (Ir)

Breatnach, Caoimhín, “The Language and Manuscript Tradition of Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil and Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair,” in The Matter of Britain in Medieval Ireland: Reassessments, ed. John Carey. London: Irish Texts Society, 2017, Subsidiary Series 29, pp. 1-28. Reveals dialect features, linguistic forms, and structural variants obscured by the editorial process. Compares Arthurian personal names, and lists manuscripts of both tales from published catalogues. (Ir)

Bromwich, Rachel, review of Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha, ed. Sheila Falconer, Medium Aevum, 25 (1956), 92-5. (Ir)

Byrne, Aisling, “Malory’s Sources for the Tale of the Sankgreal: Some Overlooked Evidence from the Irish Lorgaireacht an tSoidigh Naomhtha.” Arthurian Literature, 30 (2013): 87-100. Shows that the Irish text was translated from French (not English as has been suggested), and that a variant version of the French Queste del Saint Graal was a common source for the Lorgaireacht and for Malory.  (Ir)

Byrne, Aisling, “Writing Westwards: Medieval English Romances and their Early Modern Irish Audiences,” in Medieval into Renaissance: Essays for Helen Cooper, ed. Andrew King and Matthew Woodcock. Cambridge: Brewer, 2016, pp. 73-89. A brief discussion of Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil (p. 74) and an overview of Irish Arthuriana (pp. 82-87). (Ir)

Campbell, John Francis, ed. & trans., Popular Tales of the West Highlands, vol. I. Edinburgh: Edmonston & Douglas, 1860, new edition Paisley and London: Alexander Gardner, 1890, reprinted Hounslow: Wildwood House, 1983. Includes summary of the tale Sheen Billy, from the traveller John Macdonald (pp. lxxxix-xc). (Sc)

Carey, John, “The Grail and Ireland,” in The Matter of Britain in Medieval Ireland: Reassessments, ed. John Carey. London: Irish Texts Society, 2017, Subsidiary Series 29, pp. 29-46.  Considers that the source of the Irish Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha was the Old French Queste, and proposes an earlier dating than the previously suggested fifteenth century. Looks at literary influences, including evidence from Arthurian personal names. (Ir)
 
Carey, John, "Werewolves in Medieval Ireland," Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, 44 (Winter 2002), 37-72. Includes Arthurian connections of the "Werewolf's Tale" group of stories. (Ir)

Carroll, Clare, Circe's Cup: Cultural Transformations in Early Modern Writing about Ireland. Cork: Cork Univ. Press/Field Day, 2001, ix + 206 pp. Critical Conditions: Field Day Essays, 11. Includes "Ajax in Ulster and Ariosto in Ireland: Translating the Orlando Furioso," pp. 69-90, illus. Discusses influences on, and the purpose of, the Irish Arthurian romance Orlando agus Melora. (Ir)

Cunningham, Bernadette, "A scholar's notebook: NLI MS GI and the cultural world of a sixteenth-century Irish chronicler," in Regions and Rulers in Ireland, 1100-1650: Essays for Kenneth Nicholls, ed. David Edwards. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2004, pp. 160-73. Cork Studies in Irish History. Includes reference to a tradition of King Arthur's disappearance into a fairy mound. (Ir)

----- and Raymond Gillespie, Stories from Gaelic Ireland: Microhistories from the sixteenth-century Irish annals. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2003, 224 pp., illus. Includes references to Eachtra an mhadra mhaoil in the context of sixteenth-century Irish society. (Ir)

D’Arcy, Anne Marie, Wisdom and the Grail: The Image of the Vessel in the Queste del Saint Graal and Malory’s Tale of the Sankgreal. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2000, 412 pp.  Passim, compares and contrasts passages in the Irish Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha with the Queste and with Malory’s handling of the same material. (Ir)

Dottin, Georges, Les Littératures celtiques (Irlande, Écosse, Pays de Galles, Bretagne). Paris: Payot, 1924. Brief reference to Irish development of the Arthurian cycle (p. 51). (Ir)

Draak, A. M. E., "Sgél Isgaide Léithe," Celtica, 3 (1956), pp. 232-40. Identifies a previously unrecognised manuscript of Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe, discusses manuscript reference to a title "Sgél Isgaide Léithe," and compares the Scottish poem Triath na nGaoidheal Giolla-easbuig (see Watson, "Unpublished Gaelic Poetry," Section 1.4). (Ir/Sc)

Flower, Robin, The Irish Tradition. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1947, reprinted Dublin: Lilliput Press, 1994. The chapter "Ireland and Medieval Europe" (pp. 107-41) contains brief reference to Arthurian tales (pp. 135-36). (Ir)

Fraser, J., "The Prince of Gascony," Arthuriana: A Review of Mediaeval Studies, 2 (1929-30), 30-35. On Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe. (Ir)

Gowans, Linda, "The Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir as a Response to the Perceval of Chrétien de Troyes," Arthurian Literature, 19: Comedy in Arthurian Literature (2003), 199-230. Shows that the Irish prose tale is a closer response to Chrétien's work than has hitherto been realised, and discusses the relationship of prose Eachtra and verse Laoidh. (Ir/Sc)

Gwynn, Edward, review of Caithréim Conghail Cláiringhnigh (Martial Career of Conghal Cláiringhneach), ed. and trans. Patrick M. MacSweeney, Hermathena, 13 (1905), 457-68. (Ir)

Hyde, Douglas, A Literary History of Ireland. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1899, revised edition London: Benn, 1967. Page 572, n 3, contains an unreferenced list of stories, of which Teglach an bhuird Chruinn ("the Household of the Round Table") and "the History of King Arthur" do not appear to have been identified by subsequent scholarship. (Ir)

Goetinck, Glenys, Peredur: A Study of Welsh Tradition in the Grail Legends. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1975. Includes discussion of Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir and Ridire na Sgiatha Deirge ("The Knight of the Red Shield"). (Ir/Sc)

Le Menn, Gwennolé, La femme au sein d'or. Saint-Brieuc: Skol - Dastum, 1985. Skol, 86-88. Detailed study of versions from Brittany, with summaries of those from Scotland. (Sc)

MacCraith, Mícheál, and David Worthington, "Aspects of the literary activity of the Irish Franciscans in Prague, 1629-1786," in Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale, 1602-1820, ed. Thomas O'Connor and Mary Ann Lyons. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2003, pp. 118-34. On p. 130 provides a brief note of the context in which the tale of Merlino Maligno may have arisen. (Ir)

Mac Gerailt, Uáitéar, “Middle Irish Archaisms in Early Modern Irish Prose,” Studia Hibernica 38 (2012), 57-116. Deals, inter alia, with the language of the Irish Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha. (Ir)
 
Mac Gill-Fhinnein, Gordon, "Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir," Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr, 4 (1989), 75-81. Stresses the humour of the story. Article in Irish with English summary. (Ir/Sc)

Mühlhausen, L., "Neue Beiträge zum Perceval-Thema," Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 17 (1928), 1-30. Discusses the Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir, with German translation of the opening section, and some reference to the Laoidh. (Ir)

Nagy, Joseph Falaky, A New Introduction to Two Irish Arthurian Romances. London: Irish Texts Society, 1998, 18 pp. Irish Texts Society Subsidiary Publication Series, 7. Stresses the shortcomings of R. A. Stewart Macalister's edition and translation of Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil/Eachtra Mhacaoimh-an-Iolair (The Story of the Crop-Eared Dog/The Story of Eagle-Boy) (see Section 1.3). (Ir)

Ní Shéaghdha, Nessa, Translations and Adaptations into Irish. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1984. Statutory Lecture 1984, School of Celtic Studies. Brief discussion of
Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha (see Section 1.3), setting the work in its Irish literary context. (Ir)

Nic Dh(iarmada), M., review (in Irish) of Mhac an tSsaoi, Máire, ed., Dhá Sgéal Artúraíochta, Éigse, 5 (1946), 225-27. (Ir)

Nutt, Alfred, "Aryan Expulsion-and-Return Formula in the Folk and Hero Tales of the Celts," Folk-Lore Record, 4 (1881), 1-44. Includes discussion of Amadáin Mhóir . (Ir/Sc)

Nutt, Alfred, "Les Derniers Travaux Allemands sur la Legende du Saint Graal," Revue Celtique, 12 (1891), pp. 181-228. Includes reference to Amadáin Mhóir (p. 203). (Ir/Sc)

Nutt, Alfred, Studies on the Legend of the Holy Grail. London: D. Nutt, 1888. Includes discussion of Amadán Mór . (Ir/Sc)

Ó B., S., review of Two Irish Arthurian Romances, Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge/Gaelic Journal, 19 (1909), 191-92. (Ir)

Ó Háinle, Cathal G., “The Novel Frustrated: Seventeenth- to Nineteenth-Century Fiction in Irish,” in Unity in Diversity: Studies in Irish and Scottish Gaelic Language, Literature and History, ed. Cathal G. Ó Háinle and Donald E. Meek. Dublin: The School of Irish, Trinity College, 2004, pp. 125–51. Léann na Tríonóide/Trinity Irish Studies, 1. Explains the delayed emergence of an Irish-language novel genre; discusses Irish romance (including Arthurian) and new trends including the anti-romance hero. (Ir)

O Rathaille, Tomas, "Two Irish Arthurian Romances," Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge, 19 (1909), 355-64. Highly critical review of Macalister's work. (Ir)

Pokorny, J., review of Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha, ed. Sheila Falconer, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 27 (1959), 320-21. (Ir)

Purton, Walter J., "A Note on a Passage in the Irish Version of the Grail Legend from Stowe D. IV. 2, p. 75 b," Revue Celtique, 27 (1906), 81-4. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, "De Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir, een Ierse Arthurroman," Kelten, 10; Tien jaar Stichting A. G. van Hamel; Themanummer Arthur (mei 2001) 7-10. A short overview of Irish Arthurian romance, followed by special focus on the complex portrayal of Arthur in the Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, "Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil: Ein richtiger Artusroman?" in Festschrift für Gearóid Mac Eoin - Übersetzung, Adaptation und Akkulturation im Insularen Mittelalter, ed. Hildegard L.C. Tristram and Erich Poppe. Münster: Nodus, 1999, pp. 145-59. Discusses the role and character of Gawain (Balbhuaidh), as presented in an Irish cultural setting. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, "De Ierse bijadrage aan het genre van de Arturroman," in Hoort wonder! Opstellen voor W. P. Gerritsen bij zijn emeritaat, ed. Bart Besamusca, Frank Brandsma, and Dieuwke van der Poel. Hilversum: Verloren, 2000, pp. 141-48. Middeleeuwse Studies en Bronnen, 70. Considers the late and limited arrival of Arthurian romance in Ireland, and the location and circumstance of its production. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, “The Intended Audience of Irish Arthurian Romances,” Arthuriana, 17:4 (Winter 2007), 49-69. Compares narrative structure of the five Irish Arthurian romances and their portrayal of Arthur to French romance, and considers the intended audience. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, "Koning Arthur wil niet eten, Van gewoonte tot geis," Madoc, 15 (2001), 19-27. In the Irish Arthurian romances Arthur's well-known refusal to eat until an adventure has presented itself becomes a geis, and Arthur is represented as behaving like an Irish king. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, “Perception and Anticipation: Their Role in Interpreting Two Irish Arthurian Romances,” in The Matter of Britain in Medieval Ireland: Reassessments, ed. John Carey. London: Irish Texts Society, 2017, Subsidiary Series 29, pp. 76-91. Considers the stories in the light of recent critical and psychological investigations, drawing on the colophon in the earliest copy of Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair; discusses framework and cultural adaptation. (Ir)
 
Smelik, Bernadette, "Receptiesturende elementen in Eachtra Mhelóra agus Orlando," in Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre . . . Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld: Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, ed. Inge Genee, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik. Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003, pp. 171-85. Discusses the elements that modify the expectations of the public concerning the structure and outcome of the story. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, “Structure and Audience: the Case of the Hybrid Eachtra Mhelóra agus Orlando,” in Other Nations: The Hybridization of Medieval Insular Mythololgy and Identity, ed. W. M. Hoofnagle and W. R. Keller. Heidelberg: Winter, 2011, pp. 227-41. Analyses initial and text-specific anticipation in the case of a newly formed Arthurian narrative. (Ir)

Smelik, Bernadette, "The Structure of the Irish Arthurian Romance Eachtra Mhacaoimh-an-Iolair," Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, 45 (Summer 2003), 43-57. Discusses whether the author's claim of a French antecendent for the story of the Eagle-Youth is compatible with the romance's structure and Arthurian content. (Ir)

Vendryes, J., review of "An t-Amadán Mór," ed. T. Ó Rabhartaigh and Douglas Hyde, Revue Celtique, 44 (1927), 485. (Ir)

Weston, Jessie, review of Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil/Eachtra Mhacaoimh-an-Iolair (The Story of the Crop-Eared Dog/The Story of Eagle-Boy): Two Irish Arthurian Romances, ed. and trans. R.A. Stewart Macalister, Folk-Lore, 20 (1909), 361-63. (Ir)

Zimmer, Heinrich, review of Alfred Nutt, Studies on the Legend of the Holy Grail, Göttingische gelehrte Anzeigen, 12 (1890), pp. 488-528. Refers to Irish Arthurian texts (pp. 503, 510). Note: Eachtra Ridire na Leomhan ("The Adventures of the Knight of the Lions"), though included in Zimmer's discussion, is not an adaptation of Chrétien de Troyes' Arthurian romance Le Chevalier au Lion - see Bruford (Section 2.6), passim. (Ir)


2.4 Poetic Works

See also Coira, M. Pía (Section 2.5) on poetic references in a genealogical context, and Hartnett (Section 2.6), pp. 115-16, on the popularity of the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir. The Laoidh is also discussed by many writers on the prose Eachtra: see Section 2.3.

Breatnach, Pádraig A., "Words to Music: Lays, Songs and Ballads," Éigse, 30 (1997), 161-68. A review article on Hugh Shields, Narrative Singing in Ireland: Lays, ballads, come-all-yes and other songs. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1993 (see this section, below). Includes discussion of the tradition of lays of Fionn and the Fianna. (Ir)

Dooley, Ann, "Arthur in Ireland: the earliest citation in native Irish literature," Arthurian Literature, 12 (1993), 165-72. Identifies a reference to Arthur in a fourteenth-century eulogy by Gofraidh Fionn Ó Dálaigh to his patron Diarmaid Mág Carthaigh. The relevant quatrain is quoted and translated (p. 167). A possible Irish reference to Tristram is also cited (pp.171-72). (Ir)

Dooley, Ann, "The poetic self-fashioning of Gofraidh Fionn Ó Dálaigh," in Ogma: Essays in Celtic Studies in honour of Próinséas Ni Chatháin, ed. Michael Richter and Jean-Michael Picard. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2002, pp. 211-23. Looks at the context of the reference to Arthur noted in the entry above. (Ir)

The Gesto Collection of Highland Music, ed. Keith Norman MacDonald, with Appendix by Frances Tolmie. Leipzig: for the editor, 1895, reprinted Felinfach: Llanerch, 1997. The tune Hó Ró, Hùg Ó, Hug Ó!, Appendix, p. 15, was used for a version of Am Bròn Binn (see Am Bròn Binn, ed. Gowans, Section 1.4, p. 16). (Sc)

Gowans, Linda, "A Note on Item 27 of the Henderson Collection in Glasgow University Library," The Bibliotheck, 15 (1988), 34-36. Amends catalogue entry for a version of Am Bròn Binn.

McDonald, Patrick, ed., A collection of Highland Vocal Airs Never hitherto published (etc.). Edinburgh: "for the publisher," 1784. Includes, under "Argyleshire Airs," "Laoidh an amadain mhòir: An ancient air" (p. 18). Note: for translations of the poems sung to the tunes given, the reader is referred by McDonald to the Rev. John Smith's Galic antiquities: see entries for Smith, this section, below. (Sc)

McHugh, Sheila Joyce., "The Lay of the Big Fool: Its Irish and Arthurian Sources," Modern Philology, 42 (1945), 197-211. Discusses the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir with some reference to prose tales. (Ir/Sc)

McHugh, Sheila Joyce., Sir Percyvelle: Its Irish Connections. Ann Arbor: Edwards Brothers, 1946. Discusses the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir with some reference to the prose Eachtra. (Ir/Sc)

MacInnes, John, "Twentieth-Century Recordings of Scottish Gaelic Heroic Ballads," in The Heroic Process: Form, Function and Fantasy in Folk Epic, ed. Bo Almqvist et al. Dublin: Glendale, 1987, pp. 101-30. Includes reference to Am Bròn Binn (pp. 123-24). Reprinted in Dùthchas nan Gàidheal: Selected Essays of John MacInnes, ed. Michael Newton. Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2006, pp. 184-210, notes pp. 524-27. (Sc)

McLeod, Wilson, Divided Gaels: Gaelic Cultural Identities in Scotland and Ireland c.1200-c.1650. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2004, xiv + 288 pp. In the context of Caimbeul ancestry, notes (p. 123) an unpublished poem  Dual ollamh do thriall le toisg (“It is customary for a high-poet to journey on an embassy”), National Library of Scotland, Adv. MS 72.2.2, 8v, 10, 11r  (c. 1595), which cites Irish locations under tribute to King Arthur. (Ir/Sc)
 
McLeod, Wilson, “Images of Scottish warriors in later Irish bardic poetry,” in The World of the Galloglass: Kings, warlords and warriors in Ireland and Scotland, 1200–1600, ed. Seán Duffy. Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2007, pp. 169–87. Quotes from the poem noted in Divided Gaels (above) and considers its context and dating. (Ir/Sc)
 
McLeod, Wilson, “Sovereignty, Scottishness and Royal Authority in Caimbeul Poetry of the Sixteenth Century,” in Fresche Fontanis: Studies in the Culture of Medieval and Early Modern Scotland, ed. Janet Hadley Williams and J. Derrick McClure. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, pp. 231-48. There is further discussion on pp. 243-44 of the Irish context of the poem noted in the two items by McLeod above. (Ir/Sc)

Meek, Donald E., review of Am Bròn Binn: An Arthurian Ballad in Scottish Gaelic, ed. Linda Gowans (see Section 1.4), Scottish Gaelic Studies, 19 (1999), 261-64.

Morison, Jane Fraser, ed., Highland airs and quick steps, 2 vols. Inverness: Logan & Co., 1880, 1882. Vol. 2 contains a tune for the Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir. (Sc)

Murphy, Gerard, Studies, 37 (1948), 368-71. Review of Sheila Joyce. McHugh's, Sir Percyvelle: Its Irish Connections (see above, this section). (Ir/Sc)

Ó Mainnín, Mícheál B., " 'The Same in Origin and in Blood': Bardic Windows on the Relationship between Irish and Scottish Gaels, c. 1200-1650," Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies, 38 (Winter, 1999), 1-51. Pages 41-47 include discussion of bardic references to King Arthur and the Campbell claim of descent from him. (Ir/Sc)

Rejhon, A. C., "Hu Gadarn: Folklore and Fabrication," in Celtic Folklore and Christianity: Studies in Memory of William W. Heist, ed. Patrick K. Ford. Santa Barbara: McNally & Loftin, 1983, pp. 201-12. Includes discussion of Am Bròn Binn. (Sc)

Ross, Anne, "Chain Symbolism in Pagan Celtic Religion," Speculum, 34 (1959), 39-59. Includes discussion of Am Bròn Binn (p. 55). (See also Ross, Section 1.4.) (Sc)

Sanger, Keith, and Alison Kinnaird, Tree of Strings/Crann nan Teud: a history of the harp in Scotland. Temple, Midlothian: Kinmor Music, 1992. Includes discussion of Am Bròn Binn. (Sc)

Shields, Hugh, Narrative Singing in Ireland: Lays, Ballads, Come-all-Yes and Other Songs. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1993, reprinted 2009. Includes tune of Laoi an Amadáin Mhóir recorded from Seán Bán Mac Grianna of Co. Donegal in the 1970s, and discussion of the text. (Ir)

Simms, Katharine, Bardic Poetry Database, online at  http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/  An introduction explains the content and search system; e.g. a search under ‘Apologue’ for ‘Arthur’ produces information on classical Gaelic poems in which he is mentioned. (Ir/Sc)

Smith, Rev. John, Galic antiquities. Edinburgh: Cadell & Eliot, 1780. Includes spurious "translations" entitled "The Lamentation of Umad for his hound" and "The Death of Artho." See Smith, Sean dana, below. (Sc)

Smith, Rev. John, Sean dana. Edinburgh: Charles Eliot, 1787. Includes the purported "originals," Laoi an Amadáin Mhóir and Bas Airt 'ic Ardair, of the "translations" published in Galic antiquities (see Smith, above). These bear no resemblance to texts of the Laoidh or of Am Bròn Binn collected from oral tradition. (Sc)

Stern, L.C., "Ossianische Gedichte aus Caithness," Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 5 (1905), 550-65. Discusses a collection which includes a version of Laoidh an Amadáin Mhóir from Christina Sutherland, born 1775. (Sc)

Stiùbhart, Domhnall Uilleam, ed., The Life & Legacy of Alexander Carmichael: Proceedings of a conference arranged by The Islands Book Trust. Port of Ness: The Islands Book Trust, 2008. References passim to Am Bròn Binn. In particular, Cathlin MacAulay, "Uist in the School of Scottish Studies Archives," pp. 156-71, including a text and translation; Isa MacKillop, Norman Johnson and Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart, "Margaret MacDonald (Mairead Aonghais Duinn) 1791–1874," pp. 180-81, a memoir of one of Carmichael’s informants. (Sc)


2.5 Genealogical

See also McLeod, Wilson (three items), and Ó Mainnín, Mícheál B., on Clan Campbell poetry in Section 2.4.

Boardman, Stephen, The Campbells, 1250–1513. Edinburgh: John Donald, 2006, xxv + 374 pp., illus.  Includes Campbell claims of Arthurian/British descent; also finds evidence for Arthurian interest connected with areas of Stewart lordship. Discussion brings in Stirling and the area around the Firth of Clyde. (Sc)

Campbell, John Francis, ed. & trans., Popular Tales of the West Highlands, vol. III. Edinburgh: Edmonston & Douglas, 1862, new edition Paisley and London: Alexander Gardner, 1892, reprinted Hounslow: Wildwood House, 1984. Includes notes on Arthur and his son Smoroie Mor in Clan Campbell genealogy within discussion of Laoidh Dhiarmaid ("The Lay of Diarmaid"), pp. 92-102. (Sc)

Campbell of Airds, Alastair, A History of Clan Campbell. Vol. I: From Origins to Flodden. Edinburgh: Polygon, 2000, xxx + 338 pp., illus. Chapter 1, "Out of the Mists" (pp. 1-19, notes pp. 305-06), deals with clan genealogy, including the Arthurian claim. The background of the name MacArthur is also explored. (Ir/Sc)

Coira, M. Pía, By Poetic Authority: The Rhetoric of Panegyric in Gaelic Poetry of Scotland to c.1700. Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2012, xxvi + 438 pp. References passim to Arthur in genealogy and poetry, principally linked to Clan Campbell and leading in turn to a claim on behalf of Clan Gregor (see Watson, Scottish Verse, Section 1.4). (Sc)

Gillies, William, "The 'British' Genealogy of the Campbells," Celtica, 23 (1999), 82-95. Disscusses the version in Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh's Book of Genealogies, c. 1650. (Ir/Sc)

Gillies, William, “The Invention of Tradition, Highland-style,”  in The Renaissance in Scotland: Studies in Literature, Religion, History and Culture Offered to John Durkan, ed. A. A. MacDonald, Michael Lynch and Ian B. Cowan. Leiden: Brill, 1994, pp. 144–56. Discusses the construction and application of Campbell genealogy’s complex British, Continental, and Gaelic strands. (Sc)

Gillies, William, "Some Aspects of Campbell History," Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, 50 (1976-78), 256-95. Includes discussion of Arthur in Campbell genealogy (pp. 280-83. (Sc)

MacGregor, Martin, "The Campbells: Lordship, Literature, and Liminality," Textual Cultures: Texts, Contexts, Interpretation, 7 (2012), 121-157. Includes consideration of the circumstances in which Campbell interests came to be represented in Arthurian terms, the difficulties involved, and in particular the role of the poet (p. 24).  (Sc/Ir)
 
MacGregor, Martin, "Civilising Gaelic Scotland: The Scottish Isles and the Stewart Empire," in The Plantation of Ulster, 1609-2009: A Laboratory for Empire?, eds. M Ó Siochru and E Ó Ciardha. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2012, pp. 33-54. Within a detailed discussion of relationships, perceived divisions, and terminology, explores the development of the Campbell sense of Britishness, with reference (p. 42) to the Arthurian contribution. (Sc/Ir)

MacGregor, Martin, "The genealogical histories of Gaelic Scotland," in The spoken word: Oral culture in Britain, 1500-1850, ed. Adam Fox and Daniel Woolf. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2002, pp. 196-239. Suggests that Clan Campbell's Arthurian genealogical strand is related to the professional heritage of the MacEwens, the clan's hereditary poets and historians. (Sc)

MacGregor, Martin, "Writing the history of Gaelic Scotland: a Provisional Checklist of 'Gaelic' Genealogical Histories," in Caindel Alban: Fèill-sgrìobhainn do Dhòmhnaill E. Meek, eds. C. Ó Baoill and N. R. McGuire. Special edition of Scottish Gaelic Studies, 24 (2008), 357-79. A discussion supplementary to the author’s work of 2002 (see above). Argues for a “gradual, qualified and not unanimous” (p. 362) identification of King Arthur with the Artúr of classical Campbell genealogy. (Sc)

MacInnes, John, "Gaelic Poetry and Historical Tradition," in The Middle Ages in the Highlands, ed. Loraine Maclean of Dochgarroch. Inverness: Inverness Field Club, 1981, pp. 142-63. Includes dicsussion of Arthur in Clan Campbell genealogy. Reprinted in Dùthchas nan Gàidheal: Selected Essays of John MacInnes, ed. Michael Newton. Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2006, pp. 3-33, notes pp. 513-18. (Sc)

Ó Baoill, Colm, “Scotticisms in a Manuscript of 1467,” Scottish Gaelic Studies, 15 (Spring 1988), 122-39.  Identifies the scribe and discusses his patronage, language, and the Irish location and context of production of  the “1467 manuscript.” (The latter occupies folios 1-9 of what is now National Library of Scotland, Advocates’ MS 72.1.1, and contains the Clan Campbell genealogy edited by Ronald Black – see Section 1.5). (Sc/Ir)

Sellar, W.D.H., "The Earliest Campbells - Norman, Briton or Gael?" Scottish Studies, 17 (1973), 109-25. Includes discussion of Arthur and his son Meirbi or Smeirbe in clan genealogy, with additional references. (Sc)

2.6 Miscellaneous and General

Note: bibliographies and manuscript catalogues are listed by Hartnett (see this section, below). Only selected publications later than his 1973 work are therefore included here.

Baumgarten, Rolf, Bibliography of Irish Linguistics and Literature, 1942-71. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1986. (Ir)

Bruford, Alan, Gaelic Folktales and Mediaeval Romances: A study of the Early Modern Irish 'Romantic Tales' and their oral derivatives. Béaloideas, 34 (1966), and Dublin: The Folklore of Ireland Society, 1969. Important discussion, with much information on the content of Gaelic tales. Includes a bibliography with manuscript locations for Irish and Scottish items. (Ir/Sc)

Collins, John, review of Bruford, Alan, Gaelic Folktales and Mediaeval Romances (see above, this section), Studia Hibernica, 10 (1970), 150-54. (Ir/Sc)

Cunningham, Bernadette, The world of Geoffrey Keating: History, myth and religion in seventeenth-century Ireland. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000 (paperback 2004), xv +263 pp., illus. Includes Keating's attitude to accounts of Arthur's conquest of Ireland (pp. 146-48). (Ir)

de Brún, Pádraig, and Máire Herbert, Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in Cambridge Libraries. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1986. (Ir)

Flower, Robin, Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in the British Library (formerly British Museum), Vol. II. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1992. Reprint of first edition, London: British Museum, 1926. Much information on manuscripts containing Irish Arthurian texts - see Hartnett (this section, below), Finding List, for numbers. (Ir)

Fulton, Helen, ed., A Companion to Arthurian Literature. Malden, MA and Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009 (hardback), 2012 (paperback). Includes: Juliette Wood, "The Arthurian Legend in Scotland and Cornwall," pp. 102-16, with a short contextualization of the Gaelic material; Joseph Falaky Nagy, "Arthur and the Irish," pp. 117-27, a survey from early examples of the name to the Irish romantic tales. (Ir/Sc)

Gillies, William, "Arthur in Gaelic Tradition, Part I: Folktales and Ballads," Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies, 2 (1981), 47-72. Important overall survey. (Ir/Sc/Nv)

Gillies, William, "Arthur in Gaelic Tradition, Part II: Romances and Learned Lore," Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies, 3 (1982), 41-75. Important overall survey. (Ir/Sc)

Gowans, Linda, "Arthurian Survivals in Scottish Gaelic," The Arthurian Yearbook, 2 (1992), ed. Keith Busby, pp. 27-76. New York & London: Garland Publishing, 1992, illus.. Discussion of prose and verse texts, with particular reference to informants. (Ir/Sc/Nv) See images

Gowans, Linda, Cei and the Arthurian Legend. Cambridge: Brewer, 1988. Arthurian Studies, 18. Chapter 11, "Scotland and beyond" (pp. 151-61, notes pp. 191-93), refers to the story Ridire na Sgiatha Deirge ("The Knight of the Red Shield"). (Sc/Nv).

Hartnett, Connor P., "Irish Arthurian Literature." Unpublished doctoral dissertation, New York University, 1973, 2 vols. (A 2-volume printout was produced by University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Michigan.) Substantial resource, with otherwise unavailable translations. (Ir/Sc)
Contents:
Vol. I: Part A, Introduction pp. i-v. Discussion, including prose and verse texts, pp. 1-328.
Vol. II: Part B, Translations. Introduction, pp. 329-36.
   The Visit of Gray-Ham, pp. 337-80
   The Adventures of Melora and Orlando, pp. 381-444
   The Adventures of the Big Fool, pp. 445-516
   In Obitum Jacobi Pursell Baronis de Luaghma: An Elegy with an Account of the Obtaining of Galahad's Sword, pp. 517-37. (Gaelic text and translation: see also O'Sullivan and Ó Riain, Poems on Marcher Lords, Section 1.4.)
   The Passing of Arthur into the Fairy Mansions, p. 538. (Gaelic text and translation of a short unpublished sixteenth-century text: see also Hartnett pp. 27-8.)
   Note: The chastity-testing poem "The Gruagach with the Swan" is translated in Vol. I, pp. 175-76.
Vol. II: Part C, Finding List of manuscripts, pp. 539-71. (For Irish texts see also Bruford, this section, above, and for Scottish see also Am Bròn Binn, ed. Gowans, Section 1.4.)
Vol. II: Part D, Index of Personal Names, Names of Places, and Names of Important Objects in Irish Arthurian Literature, pp. 572-720.
Vol. II: Bibliography, pp. 721-68. Includes a section on "Manuscript, Bibliographical, and Research Guides," pp. 760-66.

Henderson, Rev. George, "Arthurian Motifs in Gadhelic Literature," in Miscellany presented to Kuno Meyer, ed. Osborn Bergin and Carl Marstrander, Halle: Max Niemeyer, 1912, pp. 18-33. Discusses prose and verse texts, and identifies the role of Gawain. (See also Henderson, Section 1.4.) (Ir/Sc)

Lacy, Norris J., and Raymond H. Thompson, ed., "Arthurian Literature, Art, and Film, 1995-1999," Arthurian Literature, 18 (2001), 193-255. Provides updates and additions to the 1995 edition of the New Arthurian Encyclopedia, including an entry on "Gaelic Arthurian Literature" by Linda Gowans, pp. 216-18. (Ir/Sc/Nv)

Mackechnie, John, Catalogue of Gaelic Manuscripts in Selected Libraries in Great Britain and Ireland, 2 vols. Boston: Hall, 1973. Important for the major Scottish Gaelic collections from oral sources. (Sc)

Murphy, Gerard, The Ossianic Lore and Romantic Tales of Medieval Ireland. Dublin: Colm Ó Lochlainn, 1955, reprinted 1961, revised reprint Cork: Mercier, 1971. Includes short discussion of Irish texts containing Arthurian material. (Ir)

Ní Shéaghdha, Nessa, Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in the National Library of Ireland, 13 fasc. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1967-1996. (Ir)

Ó Cuív, Brian, Catalogue of Irish Language Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library at Oxford and Oxford College Libraries, 2 vols. Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2001, 2003. Part I: Descriptions, xxxix + 323 pp; Part II: Plates and Indexes, xix + 161 pp., illus.

O'Grady, Standish Hayes, Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in the British Library (formerly British Museum), Vol. I. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1992. Reprint of first edition, London: British Museum, 1926. (Ir)

Ó hÓgáin, Dáithí, "Has the Time Come? (MLSIT 8009). The Barbarossa legend in Ireland and its historical background," Béaloideas, 59 (1991), pp. 197-207. Connects Arthurian and Geraldine tradition. (Ir)

O'Rahilly, T. F., Review of Miscellany Presented to Kuno Meyer, in Gadelica I (1912-13), 292-95. Comments briefly on Henderson's article (see Sections 1.4, 2.6). (Ir/Sc)

Stiùbhart, Domhnall Uilleam, “Arthur en terre gaélique,” in Mémoire, oralité, culture dans les pays celtiques. La légende arthurienne – Le celtisme, ed. Joseph Rio. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2008, pp. 85–99. Actes de l’Université d’été 2002, Université de Bretagne Sud. Deals with the relationship between literary and non-literary items, and the assimilation of Arthurian elements to a Gaelic milieu. (Ir/Sc)

Watson, W. J, The History of the Celtic Place-Names of Scotland. Edinburgh & London: Blackwood, for The Royal Celtic Society, 1926, reprinted Edinburgh: Birlinn, 1993. Includes names with Arthurian connections (see esp. pp. 208-09). (Sc)

Williams, J. E. Caerwyn, and Patrick K. Ford, eds., The Irish Literary Tradition. Cardiff: Univ. of Wales Press, 1992, reprinted 1997, xii + 355 pp. Includes (pp. 136-39) a brief but informative introduction to Irish Arthurian literature. (Ir)